Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,220 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Song of the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1220 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though writer-director Richard Shepard (“The Matador”) knows how to spin a yarn about the vicissitudes of fate, Dom’s adventures make for a pretty thin garment in which to cloth such an outsize antihero.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less deeply affecting than merely admirable. It’s a good, slick and well-intentioned film that wants so hard to be an important one that the slight feeling of letdown it leaves is magnified.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a far more interesting movie taking place alongside this more than slightly silly one.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The story’s message may not be the most original one in the world — put down your device and make eye contact — but it’s fun to watch it unfold in a world that, while far from realistic, feels real enough.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Double retains all of Dostoevsky’s central themes. Madness, alienation and the loss of identity swirl around the film’s edges like film-noir fog. At the same time, the filmmakers inject a much-needed dose of dark humor into the tale.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem with A Million Ways to Die in the West is one of editing. There are a million jokes in it, but only 500,000 of them are funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    “Restrepo” felt like the story of how boys become men. Korengal feels like the story of how strangers become family.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The absence of legal details makes the movie something of a cheat. It offers few insights about the case from the official side, let alone about the machinations of Ai’s legal team.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a thoughtful and workmanlike portrait, but a less than profoundly moving one.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Segel and Diaz are gifted and game comedians, with a lot of audience appeal. But Lowe clearly upstages them, consummating their Sex Tape — and making you want to roll over and have a cigarette — while there’s still one reel to go.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film ends with an ambiguous, yet powerful conclusion. It doesn’t answer the question it raises, yet the way it’s asked keeps it echoing in your head. Except that Cahill can’t seem to leave well enough alone.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sense, in the first half of the film, that love and contentment are attainable dreams slowly gives way to the more existential notion that happiness is really just a fairy tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The final destination of A Five Star Life is well worth the wait, but the service is so slow that some viewers may check out early.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Pay 2 Play makes no new revelations... The difference with this movie is that it actually means to inspire hope.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wetlands has only a sketchy plot, based largely on Helen’s dreams, fantasies and childhood memories. It isn’t terribly clear where the movie — or its hedonistic heroine — is going, but getting there is one wild ride.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Take Me to the River includes just enough history of the civil rights era to lend it gravitas. The color-blind recording practices of studios like Stax were an anomaly at the time and are well worth noting. But it’s the music people will want to hearken to.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the film’s heavy-handed effort at vindication, Renner manages to deliver a performance that is complex and satisfyingly contradictory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s engaging and watchable, even as it marches toward a seemingly suicidal climax. Yet the complex dynamic between Wardaddy and his men is far more fascinating.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A lovingly laid-back documentary about the charms, liquid and otherwise, of the traditional Irish watering hole.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is an intellectual puzzle, the outcome of which is never in doubt. Its minor thrills come not from not knowing what will happen, but from watching the cagey choreography of two acrobatic minds.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jackson’s storytelling at this point is so driven by green-screen trickery and digital legerdemain that he seems to have forgotten about human emotion.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    While by no means a masterpiece, the comedy, by Canadian director Ken Scott, is a careful calibration of crass gags and genuine sentiment that succeeds more often than it fails.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is, however, a certain urgency to the action that will prevent most people from noticing the film’s flaws.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Stirring at times, soggy and overly sentimental at others, the film moves surprisingly slow, even though its action, which takes place over many years of legal maneuvering, has been condensed for narrative expediency.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie marches so quickly past the many milestones of Welles’s career and life that it doesn’t have to time to linger — lovingly or otherwise — on any of them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you can hang on for close to two hours with almost no resolution, it’s worth the ride.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film suffers a bit for its slowness. But once you get used to the fact that this is not “World War Z,” it has its small pleasures, which are both cerebral and emotional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although he comes across as a sort of elfin crypt-keeper in this intriguing portrait by documentarian Belinda Sallin, Giger was also, quite literally, close to death.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Servin and Vamos clearly have a healthy sense of the absurd, which they use, like good satirists, to highlight hypocrisy, greed and corruption.

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