Michael O'Sullivan
Select another critic »
For 1,006 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 This Must Be the Place
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1,006 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a compelling, even stirring, tale.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Under the direction of George Tillman Jr., these two young performers exercise remarkable restraint, never milking the material for unearned tears.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s as affecting as drama as it is effective as horror. It wrenches, even as it unnerves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    God Loves Uganda clearly lays the blame for it at the feet of the American evangelical movement. The movie doesn’t really argue its case, preferring to stand back, in quiet outrage, as the representatives of that movement are shown with the match in their hands.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ender’s Game is more than a parable about bullying, or a disquisition on the concept of the “just war.” It’s also a rousing action film, especially in Imax.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    By the end of this troubling film, the cognitive dissonance that it highlights — between the theoretical glorification of the illegal Mexican drug industry and its actual cost in blood — is jarring. It’s an important film, but Narco Cultura is also maddeningly hard to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The second part of Peter Jackson’s “The Hobbit” trilogy goes a long way — and at 2 1/2 hours, I do mean long — toward righting the wrongs of the first movie, which was even longer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is an effective, even heartwarming, tale of one man’s commitment to teaching that playing by the rules is more important than winning.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Tim’s Vermeer makes a convincing case that Vermeer could have painted the way Jenison says he did. It also makes a pretty powerful ancillary point: that some people are both geniuses and geeks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The films are highly entertaining and highly disturbing, in the latter case for both the right and the wrong reasons. While admirably delineating moral decay, which eats away at one character like a virus, the movies never really get at the seed of evil.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Elaine Stritch’s strength, along with the film’s, comes from her honesty. She is herself, even when — maybe especially when — she knows she’s being watched.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Director Neil Burger (“Limitless”) has crafted a popcorn flick that’s leaner, more propulsive and more satisfying than the bestseller that inspired it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It plays out with all the suspense of a thriller. Assisted by acclaimed editor Walter Murch, Levinson wisely shapes the story not around the hardware, which was plagued by malfunctions and other delays, but around the people tasked with making the LHC run.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Trinca delivers a marvelously unfussy performance, rendering her complex character gradually, along with the effects of the opposing forces that tear at her.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Oculus director Mike Flanagan has crafted a satisfyingly old-fashioned ghost story that, in its evocation of shivery dread, is the most unnerving poltergeist picture since “The Conjuring.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    For No Good Reason rambles too much for its own good, compared to more traditional documentaries. The most rewarding parts of the film feature Steadman simply talking about his influences (Picasso, among others) and his youthful goal of changing the world through art.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fed Up isn’t so much a warning to the ignorant shopper or a tip for the unimaginative chef as it is a rallying cry. It succeeds in firing up the choir. Whether it will convert the complacent is an open question.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Days of Future Past is, in itself, as intoxicating as a shot of adrenaline. It’s what summer movies are meant to be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The first half of Cold is tense and suspenseful, albeit in a conventional way; the second half is sickeningly compelling. It’s hard to watch and hard to look away from.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Puenzo has a knack for plumbing the heads and hearts of teenage girls. The director coaxes a mesmerizing, unmannered performance out of Bado, who is making her feature-film debut.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you have a shred of idealism left, it’s hard to watch Citizen Koch without a mounting sense of despair and outrage over the influence that money has come to wield over modern elections.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Violette mostly avoids the pitfalls associated with movies about writers by limiting the scenes of Violette scribbling furiously in a notebook.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Dawn of the Planet of the Apes works both as allegory and action-adventure film. The internecine conflict between apes mirrors the troubled history of our own race.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though the setting is a retreat from the world, where not terribly much happens, within its confines Lorenzo gets an eye-opener about both human frailty and interconnectedness, courtesy of someone even more troubled than he is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    As the movie makes clear, none of these conditions are reversible. Music isn’t a cure for anything. But it does seem to be a key to unlocking long-closed doors and establishing connections with people who have become, through age or infirmity, imprisoned inside themselves.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Franco’s hand-held camerawork draws the story forward as unfussily as a shepherd leads a sheep, and yet with a kind of ghastly grandeur. This is functional filmmaking more than it is flashy. But there is, at its heart, a single virtuosic performance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    In addition to “pervert” — which Wojtowicz makes sound like a badge of honor — the film offers many other seemingly contradictory assessments of Wojtowicz, mainly from his own mouth: troll, Goldwater Republican, McCarthy peacenik, crazy man, crook, romantic. He was all of those things and more, as The Dog makes vividly obvious.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Michael O'Sullivan
    Eavesdropping on the glib conversations of witty urbanites can be a pleasant diversion, but after so much volubility, you might find yourself wishing that they would all just shut up and dance.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Michael O'Sullivan
    Genial rather than an affront to good taste. It's also pretty darn funny.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Michael O'Sullivan
    If anyone can sell the idea of ... some psycho "Sherlock Holmes," it's Samuel L. Jackson.