Michael Phillips

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For 1,571 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Phillips' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 A Serious Man
Lowest review score: 0 Fun Size
Score distribution:
1,571 movie reviews
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The glibness of Wiesen's freshman effort wouldn't be a problem if the wit was there.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Green just isn't the superhero color this year.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Lasseter's sequel smooshes the vehicular ensemble of the first "Cars" into a nefarious James Bond universe, heavy on the missiles and ray guns and Gatling guns and electrocutions. Sound peculiar? It is peculiar.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The gentle erotic undertow in the friendship of Snow Flower and Lily has been toned down, and replaced by … niceness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is the "Babel" or "Crash" of ensemble romantic comedies, with screenwriter Dan Fogelman mapping out several narrative surprises that throw you for little loops as they're delivered.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Some comedies have the knack for affrontery and shock value; The Change-Up, written by the "Hangover" team of Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, merely has the will to offend.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If more of the picture had the inventively grotesque payoff of the scene set at the gymnastics tryout, capped by a female character's inarguably poor dismount, we might have something to puke home about.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    What proved tasty in book form comes across a little more like work in the movie.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's mostly noise and splurch and, as I mentioned, aaaaarrrrggggghhhhh!
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    To my taste there's too much of everything. The soundtrack never shuts up with the wind, the murmurings, the shudderings. And while director Nixey has talent, his indiscriminately roving camera tends to diffuse the tension, not heighten it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Although Joffe appears to be making a Brighton version of the seductively natty evil we find stateside in "Boardwalk Empire," this Brighton Rock remains muffled, half-formed pulp fiction.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Director Madden vacillates between treating the issues and historical context of The Debt seriously, and as the story demands, as pure, heavy-handed pulp. The cast does what it can in the service of this assignment. But some jobs simply resist satisfying completion.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Doesn't know how to do what I think it's trying to do.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script is a mess. It's an object lesson in taking a nonfiction book ("The Feather Men," about a cadre of ex-British Special Air Service operatives) and making a hash of it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Dumb film; smart comedienne.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I suspect a lot of what I found synthetic and sort of galling in Real Steel will work just fine with the target audience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Here and there, the actor invests the kind of feeling that makes The Way come alive in human terms.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is a gentle, diffident concoction. But it has barely enough pulse to power a hummingbird.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a film that feels hidebound. And nobody ever called a dance-driven movie "hidebound."
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not much to hijack. But playing a lovelorn version of himself, in love with Adam Sandler in a dress, a lisp and breasts, Al Pacino holds a gun to the head of the comedy Jack and Jill and says: I now pronounce you mine.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The sequel's themes of friendship and interdependency fail to generate much momentum.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a picture that is baldly manipulative yet weirdly sentimental, and while Considine (a fine actor) can write, he is capable also of writing dialogue you've heard before.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I hope Green one day finds a way to bridge the style and rhythm of his early pictures (the ones that didn't make money) and the bumper-car approach of The Sitter.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I always enjoy Elizondo; he has a way of elevating some pretty lame banter, and thanks to New Year's Eve he has his way all over again.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I fear Spielberg and Jackson hitched their wagon to the wrong technological star here.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie's all right, if you can take its rampant artificiality - and I'm not even talking about Parton's face yet.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Red Tails squanders a great subject, reducing the real-life struggles and fierce heroics of the Tuskegee Airmen to rickety cliche.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All the movie has, really, is Tilda Swinton acting up a storm, which is more than enough for some. For me, given what's up with the rest of the picture, it's not quite.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The supporting players in Man on a Ledge bring more to the party than the leads, and my suspension of disbelief seems to have gotten hung up in traffic while attempting to cross the suspension-of-disbelief bridge from the Brooklyn side.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The action beats come straight out of the video game "Call of Duty." And when you have real SEALs placed in a picture that lives and dies on the same old first-person-shooter aesthetic, you have a film divided against itself.

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