Michael Phillips
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For 1,463 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Phillips' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Museum Hours
Lowest review score: 0 I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell
Score distribution:
1,463 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The comedy works some of the time; the pathos, more so. There's an undertow of grief in 2 Days in New York relating to the passing of Marion's (and Delpy's) mother, who died in 2009.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The movie doesn't really work, but it's fascinating in the ways it doesn't. Then again, I enjoyed the spacey insanity of the Wachowskis' "Speed Racer," which they didn't even like in Asia.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    There are times when the facile flimsiness of Hello I Must Be Going threatens to float right off the screen. But Lynskey has her ways of surprising us, even when nothing in the script itself is doing so.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    When the actors are in cars, the movie's fun. When they get out to argue, or seethe, it's uh-oh time. Happily, director Scott Waugh comes out of the stunt world himself, and there's a refreshing emphasis on actual, theoretically dangerous stunt driving over digital absurdities.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Wasikowska is a fine, intriguing actress, though I'm not sure anyone could make actual psychological sense of this woman. Nobody on screen — not Kidman, not Goode, not Wasikowska, not Jacki Weaver as Auntie Gin — seems entirely at home in the chosen (or guessed-at) style.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's big, brash and dramatically it goes in circles. The first two may be enough for most people, especially if they're into Formula One racing, to overlook the third.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The actors — including Patton as Bobby's DEA colleague and sometime fling — cannot act what is not there. But with Washington, Wahlberg, Olmos and Paxton around jockeying for dominance, the standoffs have their moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Feels different from most recovering-train-wreck stories. The movie is a tidy relaying of a messy situation involving two reasonably functional middle-class LA alcoholics, one of whom gets serious about cleaning up a lot sooner than the other.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    LUV
    An uneven but strongly acted debut feature from co-writer and director Sheldon Candis.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The material settles for amiably familiar observations about the difficulties of growing old and the glories of being surrounded by beautiful music.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Uber-raunchy but pretty interesting as sex comedies go.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    A genial "Hangover" for the AARP set, Last Vegas is roughly what you'd expect, or fear, but a little better.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    There's a good movie in this story. The one that got made is roughly half-good.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    I prefer [HBO's Hitchcock biopic] "The Girl," not because of its salaciousness but because it gets at something underneath the great (truly, great) director's skin.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's quite thin, but at least Black Rock plays its "kills" for more than stupid gamer's diversions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Maybe if I liked the first "Anchorman" a little less, I'd like Anchorman 2 a little more. Still, I laughed.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    A roughly mixed but interestingly plotted offshoot of "Death of a Salesman."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The Butler tells a lot of different stories, some more effectively than others.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    For a while, Trance had me guessing, and more or less hooked. Then the violence, motivations, double-crosses and fantasy/reality tangles became tedious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The results are pretty, and sometimes beautiful. They're also a tad stiff, and the dialogue and voice-over narration sometimes has the ring of a scrupulously faithful adaptation.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Rates as more determinedly heartfelt than the first and not as witty as the second (and best). Also, no Amy Adams as Amelia Earhart in jodhpurs this time around.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    In a rom-com, there's no rom without the com. Hart and Hall give it their all.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The movie struggles to turn the story into a paradoxical easygoing thriller, befitting the age bracket of its key ensemble members.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The first-person remembrances hit you where you live, while everything else (including a bland musical score by John Piscitello) often creates the opposite of the intended effect: It keeps you at arm's length from an extraordinary story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The film's not as good as its cast, but The Way, Way Back has its moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The best material in the film is the loosest, capturing the perpetually insecure and overcompensating Pineda in his early concerts, leaping, bouncing, careening around as if every moment in every song were an audition for the next moment in the next song.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The script is corny and cliched and goes the way you expect it to go. But those things never stopped any movie from working with an audience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    There's something off in its scenes of Arterton's romantically unlucky loner showing up at Arthur's home, in the rain, distraught. If the movie weren't so determined to placate, you'd think you're in for a daring exploration of an affair between a 30-something emotional cripple and a 70-something sexy beast, unchained at last.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The sequel's not bad; it's not slovenly. Some of the jolts are effectively staged and filmed, and Wan is getting better and better at figuring out what to do with the camera, and maneuvering actors within a shot for maximum suspense, while letting his design collaborators do the rest. But Leigh Whannell's script is a bit of a jumble.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Whitaker's performance is the rock here. Even when the confrontations and evasions get a little ridiculous, he's neither wholly saint nor sinner, but something like a human being.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Cameo appearances by everyone from James Franco (as Hugh Hefner, putting the moves on Lovelace at her own premiere) to Hank Azaria (as a film "investor") dot the grimy landscape.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Affleck, in particular, finds something fierce and noble in uneven material and in his character's rage. He's not like any other actor in American movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    A handful of revisions, tweaks and adjustments, along with a musical score less bombastically grandiose, might've made this a film to remember.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The movie shoves McCarthy and Sarandon in a car together quickly, without much in the way of expository set-up.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Written by newcomer Melissa K. Stack, The Other Woman offers roughly equal parts wit and witlessness, casual smarts and jokes, lingering and detailed, regarding explosive bowel movements. Based on that ratio, I'd say the screenwriter's future in Hollywood looks pretty good.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Favreau's masterly light touch as an actor hasn't yet translated to a similarly deft offhandedness behind the camera. The movie, slick and shallow, is fairly entertaining anyway.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    It's an up-and-down movie, honest one minute and a fraud the next, but you stick with it mainly because of Hahn.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The material, limited payoff; the performer at the center, never less than arresting.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Of the 141 minutes in The Judge, roughly 70 work well, hold the screen and allow a ripe ensemble cast the chance to do its thing, i.e., act. The other 71 are dominated by narrative machinery going ka-THUNKITA-thunkita-thunkita.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Modest and good-looking, the film starts as dark comedy and ends in pathos. Director Alvarez makes the Oregon scenery a character unto itself.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Even when the film's cheating, Firth refuses to tidy up the fictionalized Lomax's emotional state. The actor, so good at playing stalwart men contending with inner demons, can utter a simple line — "I don't think I can be put back together" — and break your heart, legitimately, without histrionics.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The Armstrong Lie gets going, and gets pretty good, when Gibney is able to focus on the 2009 Tour de France itself, a race fraught with old rivalries and backstage dramas. It's the movie he set out to make in the beginning, after all. But getting there is tough going.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Olsen is pretty good, too, though with her bald-faced, moon-eyed disdain for everyone around her, the material loses some of its tension between repressed surface and roiling underbelly.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Jersey Boys the movie is a different, more sedate animal than "Jersey Boys" the Broadway musical.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Thing is, Levy is a hard-sell man. He pushes the material so hard, it's as if he were working on commission.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Draft Day feels like a play, and I don't mean a football play. It feels like a play-play at its sporadic best, in the same way J.C. Chandor's 2011 "Margin Call" felt that way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Vol. II turns into a battle (like most von Trier films) between the filmmaker's baser instincts and his searching ones.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    How you respond to the totality of Exodus: Gods and Kings will, I suspect, relate directly to how you responded to Ridley Scott's "Robin Hood" from 2010. Square, a little heavy on its feet, much of that film held me, even when its bigness trumped its goodness. Same with this one.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    With this script, Allen isn't working in farce mode. It's more an easygoing nod to W. Somerset Maugham or, in the plot's "Pygmalion"-like relationship between a cynical older man and his desired younger female charge, George Bernard Shaw.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    As a performance vehicle The Drop does the job. As a story, and an uncertainly padded script, the movie lurches and lets us get out ahead of its developments.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    This one's a margin Western. Frustratingly uneven, rarely dull.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    See the movie, flaws and all, simply to see where you stand in this digital river that runs through all our lives, connecting and isolating us in ways we're barely able to comprehend.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    And it's too bad The Skeleton Twins settles for tidy, slightly hollow narrative developments. The performers are ready to rip. For many they'll be enough.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    When the secrets of David's circumstances and motives start spilling into the daylight along with more and more blood, The Guest does a strange thing. It becomes flat-footed and a bit dull.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    The actors make up for the relative thinness of the material. Smith navigates the emotional terrain with great skill. The script is often funny but just as often cutesy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Phillips
    Each time a character gets tossed in the air by some manifestation or another, the effect is cheesy. Still, I've seen worse. For the record, the violence in Annabelle is far less copious and sadistic than the stuff in the Denzel Washington movie everybody's going to.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is less a film than a puny trampoline -- an occasion, though a grim one, for this most fervently movie-mad of American directors to show off his love for the various pulp genres mooshed together by the 2003 Dennis Lehane novel.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    In sum it plays like 12 landlocked episodes of "The Love Boat" rammed together, though without the same rate of intercourse.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Suggests that this could be the start of something adequate. Something big would've been nicer, though the movie's limitations are less a matter of scale than of imagination.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I truly wish Dear John were a better, less shamelessly manipulative movie, but a couple of the actors got me through it alive. One is Amanda Seyfried.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The results feel a little harried, as if the focus issues were never really solved.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Jackson has not cast himself well, though. He has slathered the imagery in the wrong kind of wonderment and hyperbole, both on Earth and in heaven.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Veers perilously close to the concept of poverty tourism.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The results are boring boring.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The emotions and crises feel pre-sanded, smooth to the point of blandness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While White plays it supercool, Tommy Davidson and Arsenio Hall (as Cream Corn and Tasty Freeze, respectively) swing for the fences, without much in the way of a bat.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Distressingly ordinary for such an extraordinary subject.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    DePietro struggles to reconcile the perceived demands of the romantic comedy genre (though his film is more bittersweet than most) and the tang and hustle and detail of real life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    With "Braveheart," "Passion" and now Apocalypto, Gibson clearly has established his priorities as a director. History is gore, plus a few hearthside family interludes. The trick is instilling the audience with enough rageful bloodlust to make the story work.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I wish the film version of Astro Boy provided a stronger antidote to mediocrity.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie’s partially redeemed by Seyfried, who makes her character more than a repository for audience sympathy. (Her make-out scene with Fox is handled with more suspense and care than anything else in the movie.)
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Eastwood's foursquare directorial aesthetic tends to heighten, rather than camouflage, a screenplay's shortcomings.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Assuming your psycho-pigtailed-killer memories extend back as far as "The Bad Seed," Maxwell Anderson's play filmed by director Mervyn LeRoy in 1956, Orphan may remind you of the icon made famous by Patty McCormack.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The acting is quite deft, if extremely broad, but screenwriter Kundo Koyama seesaws uncertainly between jokes and grief.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Proposal reworks "Two Weeks Notice" with the genders switched.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Clooney remains as game as ever, but the way he and McDormand push the energy here, you feel the strain. Pitt, just floating through, comes off best. He doesn't judge the moron he's playing; he just is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By the time Perfume arrives at its ridiculous mass orgy, staged at the gallows where Grenouille is supposed to meet his end, you really would rather see him meet his end than endure a ridiculous mass orgy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The harder this assault weapon went at my tear ducts, the more duct tape I wrapped around them as a defensive measure.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    G.I. Joe may not be beefier, but it’s cheesier and less aggravating than "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen," the summer ’09 headbanger it most resembles.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Extraordinarily raunchy, occasionally funny.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Most of this doc is content to wander through Franken's recent show-biz resume, to no particular end.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Just about everything in the video-gamey World War I picture Flyboys rings false, although the planes certainly are terrific.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The flaw in Death of a President isn't one of morality. It's one of dramatic interest.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Despite the proficient technique, after a while you may feel you're watching a particularly scenic snuff film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    After the fourth electrocution gag, the 10th smack in the face and the 12th assault on a wee rodent crotch, we could all use something quiet.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While Brand manages a couple of effectively brutal bits of violence, Matthew Waynee's gassy screenplay is all premise and no propulsion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A large amount of dope is smoked in The Pick of Destiny, perhaps the most since the salad days of Cheech & Chong. This may be the problem. Pot rarely helped anybody's comic timing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Holiday is a 131-minute romantic comedy for those who, if they had their way, would still be watching "Love Actually."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Making her feature-film directorial debut, Grant is going for an everyday conversational texture and a sense of life's curveballs. But the results wander and you never really believe them.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This film was not based on a video game, but that's the vibe and the aesthetic at work here: YEAH! KILL!, followed by a few muttered expressions of the horror, the horror.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Apted and his collaborators are so in awe of their subject they neglect to bring him to full human life.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    As Premonition zigzags toward its solution it loses its head completely, packing a risible final reel with left-field religious disquisitions and heartfelt warnings against infidelity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A screwy assassination thriller for these murky times, it takes half its pages from Soldier of Fortune and the other half from links provided by conspiracytheories-zapoppin.org.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It lacks the rutting nuttiness of "Basic Instinct," even as it recycles much of that film's kiss-or-kill premise.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Kasdan has inherited much of his father's surface skills; he knows how to round out a scene and keep things on story point. But In the Land of Women doesn't for a moment feel messy and chaotic where it counts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I doubt even rabid fans of the first two will consider Shrek the Third a worthy addition to the franchise.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is passable comic book stuff, dumb and loud. Loud. LOUD.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Feels constrained and rather dutiful, no matter how passionate these people are about what they're observing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I did like seeing the (fakey-looking) sheep take flying neck-high leaps at various human throats, in scenes recalling the killer rabbit in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail." And I enjoyed the Kiwi dialects. And I suspect King's next film will be better.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film is half rutting goat, half preacher.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    After seeing No Reservations you'll be hungry for a really top-flight meal. And, to go with it, a better film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's the big stuff that doesn't really work, at least well enough to be called special.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ruthlessly skilled as Atkinson is, the Bean persona of generic, maniacally grinning ineptitude owes most of its appeal to seeing just how far an actor can pull a face without pulling a muscle.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    They should've thrown everything away except the title and the outline. That's what the "Devil Wears Prada" creative team did, and that film turned out a lot richer than this one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If it gets people thinking about which light bulbs they buy and their current gas mileage and such, then it's good to have it in the world. It is, however, a panicky blur as documentaries go.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Enough with the snatching, already.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Robert Benton’s recent films have been vexing combinations of gentility and stiffness, and despite a fair bit of nudity "Feast of Love" behaves itself all too well. It’s as neat as a pin; it ties up every loose end in careful "Playhouse 90" style. Despite some awfully smart actors, Benton’s movie made me long for a few interrupted sentences and the occasionally conflicted character.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Outside the bedroom, the wartime swirl of intrigue never develops beyond postcard imagery, however. This is one of the major disappointments of the film-going year.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Nearly two hours long, 30 Days of Night makes you feel the cold (though it was shot in New Zealand) and feel the fangs, but it also makes you feel like 30 days is a pretty long time.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    In Rendition Gyllenhaal is supposed to be the smartest one in the room, yet he’s essentially just a good-looking plodder. And despite its whirligig story machinations, so is Rendition.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The best efforts of the performers cannot authenticate a plot that no longer feels inevitable. It feels contrived. And the audience stays at a remove instead of entering someone else’s nightmare.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All the astute acting in the world can’t bring such a preposterous story into the station on time and intact.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is a silly film about serious matters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Gray’s writing lacks the punch and zing that might take your mind off such rickety plotting.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is the sort of film where a character says “Here we are, having a high-minded debate ...” and you wonder if countless moviegoers will be rolling their eyes in unison.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Beowulf is all right as far as it goes, and it goes pretty far for a PG-13 rating: Dismemberment, “300”-style blood globules comin’ atcha, and a digitally futzed and, for all practical purposes, completely naked!!!
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Strives to be nothing more than easygoing and heartwarming.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Newell has done some fine work in all sorts of genres, from “Four Weddings and a Funeral” to “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” but in “Cholera” he seems to be chronicling a half-century of events, passions and desires as a tourist, not a native.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    So it’s one of those Hip, Now updates, albeit with jokes riffing on pop-cult artifacts that are already Then. I mean: “Jerry Maguire”? Moratorium!
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While not autobiographical, The Kite Runner feels authentic in its ethnic tensions, even when the narrative itself, with its handily reappearing and easily avenged villain, undermines that authenticity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is well made as far as it goes. I wish it went beyond its own carefully prescribed limits of the commercially acceptable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Allen is obsessed with the notion of getting away with murder, mulling over which personalities can shoulder the psychological burden of killing without remorse, while others crumble under the pressure. The problem is, you don’t feel the human sweat and strain in Cassandra’s Dream, despite game work from Farrell and McGregor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The eerily precise Heigl, who provided confident back-court support as the exile in Guyville also known as “Knocked Up,” has no trouble filling a leading lady’s shoes. She’s just snarky enough to be interesting, and she knows how to take a fall.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The most vivid aspect of The Eye is its poster image, that of a huge female eye with a human hand gripping the lower lid from the inside. The least vivid aspect is the way Jessica Alba delivers a simple line of expository dialogue.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The slapstick is crudely executed. And the movie never makes up its mind regarding how nasty the ghost of Kate is going to play her revenge tactics.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    With a less pedigreed international cast the whole thing would be a disaster, as opposed to a chilly new kind of disaster film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It’s a little “Karate Kid,” a smidge of “Fight Club” (with none of the ironic ambivalence toward violence that David Fincher brought to that story), a lot of “The O.C.” (evil boy Gigandet played an evil boy on that series), and presto: probable hit.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    "Superbad” got a deserved R rating for its unmitigated and gleeful raunch. Drillbit Taylor is cleaner in mouth but far uglier in spirit. Wilson and Mann do what they can to tone it up, but their scenes belong to a different film, and a fresher one.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    One of the problems with the new comedy Run, Fat Boy, Run is that it’s not English enough, even though its antagonist is a thoroughly detestable American go-getter.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    21
    21 isn’t pretentious, exactly, but it’s damn close, and in trying to whip up a melodramatic morality tale the film becomes an increasingly flabby slog.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Sidelined by a script that plays like an imitation of another era’s artifacts. It’s an oxymoron: a mild screwball romance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Isn’t eye candy; it’s a drool-worthy slice of eye pie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I enjoyed parts of Street Kings but I didn’t believe one thing about it, and I couldn’t get past Reeves’ unsuitability to his role. He may someday play a cop on the edge convincingly, but the edge needs to be sharper than this.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Midway through I started wondering why I wasn't laughing more. "Baby Mama" was not written by Fey and/or Poehler, which may be the reason.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    With her arresting, off-kilter look of bruised desire, Michelle Williams ends up being the most interesting aspect of this somber corn.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    You find yourself smiling at some of the bits, wincing through many, many others, and ultimately wondering if the pacing would've improved had either H or K developed a terrible cocaine habit.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It has a rich premise and no lack of amazements. What it lacks in any sort of dramatic shape.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Roughly the same as the first in terms of quality and style. It delivers without much visual dynamism, and with a determined emphasis on combat. In the 1951 novel the climactic battle between the good Narnians and the bad Telmarines lasted a few pages. The film version of the same battle feels like "The Longest Day."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Does not know when to quit. Nor does it extract much fun from a cockamamie story provided by George Lucas.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Cinematographer Zhao Xiaoding manages some lovely images, and some of Spottiswoode’s compositions remind you he's capable of fine work. But Hogg never comes to life, on the page or on the screen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Savage Grace comes up bland and seems to go nowhere in particular.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    An Israeli-on-Arab version of "Shampoo," You Don’t Mess With the Zohan is terrible in many ways, and shoddy in every way that has to do with filmmaking. But politically it's sort of interesting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Missed it by that much. Actually, the new version of Get Smart misses by a fair-size margin.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    What are Jolie and Freeman and McAvoy doing here, besides acting cooler than Clive Owen in "Shoot ’Em Up"? Cashing a check, that's what. Bekmametov may have talent, but the arrested-adolescent "escapism" of this picture emits a pretty bad odor.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The heartbreaking thing about Meet Dave...is its occasional funniness amid a sea of pablum. If it were completely rank, it'd be less frustrating.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's funny what you buy completely onstage and resist completely, or nearly, on-screen. Case in point: Mamma Mia!
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The story is both a muddle and a drag.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    At times the film appears on the verge of morphing into a singing-cowboy musical.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film's tone is utterly indistinct, beyond fatuous adoration of its subject.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Wine may be sunlight held together by water, as Galileo said, but Bottle Shock is held together only by Alan Rickman.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Unfortunately it’s all a bit dull.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film disappoints particularly in relation to "Young Adam," an earlier picture about sexual obsession from writer-director David Mackenzie; this one's more in line with the creamy tones and surface readings of "Asylum."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film is responsible, earnest, well-intentioned and, as it was in Sundance, maddeningly inconsistent.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    One wishes LaBute, a bleak satirist and, at his best, a crudely compelling dramatist, had taken the script and made it his own sort of twisted comedy instead of a routine thriller
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film itself, which has everything from erection jokes to a computer-generated tornado, comes down to a battle between the interpreters and a screenplay riddled with convenience, cliche and well-meaning contrivance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Half the time I wasn't sure what Lee was going for in terms of tone, or style, or focus. It was a tricky assignment to begin with, because McBride's novel, and his screenplay, is part socio-historical corrective, part magical-realist folklore, part wartime procedural.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    As skillful and charismatic as Gere is, I never get the sense he's really in there, conversing with his fellow actor.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This film is very different: chilly, methodical, a slave to 10-ton metaphor as opposed to metaphoric provocation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Too often The Express sidelines its own main character in favor of the lemon-sucking, jaw-jutting glower patented by Quaid.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Full of interesting little grace notes, and the cast is excellent, yet it grows more and more frustrating.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie expresses honest concern for the plight of so many newcomers to America, legal or illegal. What it lacks is moment-to-moment credibility.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film works a bit better than the 2004 "Punisher" installment, the one starring surly, dislikable Thomas Jane as Frank Castle.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Keanu Reeves plays Klaatu, confining his usual two-and-a-half-note vocal range to half that.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Can a formidable actress redeem a pile of solemn erotic kitsch? Kate Winslet answers that one as honestly as she can in the film version of Bernhard Schlink's 1995 novel "The Reader."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Clean enough to fly the Walt Disney Pictures flag, yet it's full of bimbos and cleavage and shots of Adam Sandler getting kicked in the shins by a dwarf.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A massive and rather tiring showcase for Bollywood action hero Akshay Kumar.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The nuttiest hunk of junk in many months.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    New in Town is "The Pajama Game" without the songs, the laughs or the bare-knuckled realism.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Nothing is harder and more elusive than successful slapstick onscreen. Nothing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A genial, sloppy, minor affair, offering a smidgen of inside baseball, which includes a gag at the expense of the forgotten, late '80s Lucas-produced epic "Willow."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I didn't half-mind Fired Up, but half a mind is more than it deserves.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie bumps along from low-grade scare to scare, and it's not lousy, mainly because Virginia Madsen prevents it from being so.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I like the end-credits sequence best, which has nothing to do with hoary complications or the miseries of stardom or the magical spellbinding powers of a cheap wig.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    There's about 10 good minutes out of 85.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A chaotic headbanger, X-Men Origins: Wolverine is saved from pure flat-footed blockbuster franchise adequacy by six things, three of them on Hugh Jackman's left hand, three on his right.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All in all? A curious preachment yarn for peace, one which makes you wonder if the filmmakers couldn't wait to get to the climactic aerial dogfights.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Next Day Air is sort of bracing, though it isn't very good: Its total lack of dramatic and comic bearings, to say nothing of a point, keeps you wondering about the next fatality, in a half-interested way.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Padding disguised as a feature-length screenplay, adapted from Belber's one-act.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    My Life in Ruins will neither ruin nor change nor significantly impact your life.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Not bad, not good, Ice Age 3 may be OK enough to do what it was engineered to do, i.e., baby-sit your kid for a while and rake in the dough.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Toward the end, G-Force starts making no sense at all, neither tonally or narratively. It may not matter to the target audience, though the look on my son's face when it was over was pure Buster Keaton. He says he liked it well enough. Me, a little less.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script of Shrink, written by Thomas Moffett, plays like "Crash" without the angst or the perpetual racial conflagrations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Why isn’t the film better? Guggenheim doesn’t seem to have prodded his subjects in any interesting directions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A surer hand behind the camera might’ve finessed the jokes more effectively, or established a consistent and satisfying tone.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    What are they trying to accomplish and is this really the best way to accomplish it?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Good actors and a talented director doing what they can to bring the truth to a script that's mostly bogus.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I laughed here and there at She's Out of My League, but I sort of hated everything it had to say about nerds and babes and the sliding scale of self-image.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The dialogue can drive you crazy with its self-consciousness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Kids may love the movie, and even kids who love the books may like it. For me, though, an astonishing percentage of the books' appeal has vanished.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I enjoyed these characters more when they were rich, rather than obscenely rich, when their self-involvement and life crises had one foot on planet Earth -- and when they weren't all gussied up like Mae West in "Sextette."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Here's how you know Josh Brolin has become a movie star: Jonah Hex may not be much with him, but without him? Perish the thought. Perish it, throw an ax in its heart, then burn it to a crisp.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    More happens in Eclipse than in the previous "Twilight" zone, "New Moon," and yet it's duller
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The very elements of Eat Pray Love that helped make it a success in 40 languages -- the breezy prose, the relentless sorting-through of dissatisfactions, a steady stream of intriguing sights -- turn the film into a travelogue with a little spiritual questing on the side.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Beyond Affleck's, the performances here lack amplitude and dramatic impact.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Duchovny and Moore have their moments; they're like two preening sharks working on commission.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By today's standards, it is only medium-bloody, though it's more than usually grim, its young protagonists sullen enough to qualify for the "Twilight" movies. Yet it affords precious little sadistic pleasure, partly because it "dares" to lay out more directly the pedophiliac demons plaguing Freddy the serial killer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Too often the film itself simply shuffles the postcards of Tibetan scenery, Buddhist rituals and the Tibetan people (many amazing faces on view, to be sure).
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If you want a relationship comedy that feels like last year's stuff, doesn't go far enough in any direction and is made watchable only by an overqualified ensemble, there's The Ex.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Routine cinema but rich history.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Turns out to be nothing special. Well, the music is. The storytelling is not.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Funny Games is fundamentally a bourgeois exercise in authorial sadism. As the methodical games grind on, the suffocatingly beige and white surroundings start to look like a mausoleum.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Church is most at home in his character’s skin; aside from the game but strident Quaid, all the leading players are ideally cast. It’s the script that isn’t ideally cast.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This debut picture never makes up its mind about what sort of comedy it wants to be. But at least it has one--a mind, that is.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Striving for low-key character comedy, Diminished Capacity ends up diminishing its returns.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ashes of Time Redux remains a hermetic and rather frustrating work, dotted by lonely, windblown figures dwarfed by the sand dunes of western China.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Last Song is primarily for teenagers looking for something disposable to cry about for a couple of hours, though I did find it a tad easier to take than "Dear John."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Clean, precise and terribly sullen, After.Life is like its female protagonist. It feels stuck between worlds, or genres.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    At one point Rourke delivers a monologue about his time in Bosnia, and the conviction the actor brings to the occasion throws the movie completely out of whack. What's actual acting doing in a movie like this?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Predators, plural, starts well and ends poorly, and in the middle it's in the middle.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The only people humiliated, really, are older people and heavy people and nerds and vegans and black people and mothers who breast-feed their 4-year-olds. Everybody else gets a pass.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Agora has everything except real drama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The story should have made for charming results on screen. Instead - and I truly don't enjoy saying so - co-adapter and director Rob Reiner's picture lands somewhere between synthetic nostalgia and the texture of real life.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Who would have believed a film with this much skin and reckless, life-threatening excess could end up a rather dull muddle?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A dramatic true story has been made into a diffident biopic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Too much of the contrasting comedy in Nanny McPhee Returns is shrill, laden with routine computer-generated effects and pounded into dust by James Newton Howard's shut-up-already musical score.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Secretariat isn't bad but it's precisely what you'd expect.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's outlandishly gory and bluntly political, the latter being more interesting than the former. It wears out its welcome, though, long before la revolucion and sequels are promised.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Legendary is so intent on paying heartfelt tribute to dogged young athletes that it neglects basic story needs.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Dwayne Johnson leaves his lovable self behind in the violent but bland Faster.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The results impart that "trapped" feeling all too well. It's a sullen affair, dominated by a grim visual palette that intrigues for about 30 minutes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Too much. Too numbing. Too coy. And ultimately too violent.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Director Madden vacillates between treating the issues and historical context of The Debt seriously, and as the story demands, as pure, heavy-handed pulp. The cast does what it can in the service of this assignment. But some jobs simply resist satisfying completion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    They put the "obvious" in "obvious."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    To my taste there's too much of everything. The soundtrack never shuts up with the wind, the murmurings, the shudderings. And while director Nixey has talent, his indiscriminately roving camera tends to diffuse the tension, not heighten it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Morgan and Eastwood are scrupulous in keeping their notions of the afterlife as general and inoffensive as possible. They have no religious or spiritual worldview to sell. As I say: Many admire this film to no end. I found its use of recent tragic events, including the London underground bombing, to be more than a little cheap.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Many of the original film's booby-trap scenarios are repeated here, but without Milius' grandiosity and nihilism. There's less of both in the new Red Dawn. It's not a disaster. It's just drab.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    She tackled "The Tempest" on stage, years ago. On screen I wish she'd (Taymor) adapted it with a freer hand, and then directed it with a more considered one.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A facsimile of a masquerade of a gloss on "Charade," and on all the lesser cinematic charades that followed in the wake of director Stanley Donen's 1963 picture.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    My God is this script predictable. Each relapse and betrayal shows up announced, and then announced again, a little louder, by the dialogue equivalent of an aggravating doorman.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    For many, this central performance will be more than enough. For others, the film will simply be too much.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Unexpectedly sour, The Dilemma barely qualifies as a comedy.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Here and there an image of spectral beauty, assisted by the 3-D technology, floats into view and captures our imagination. But the script, which really should've been called "Sanctimonium," has a serious case of the bends.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I found the mythology of I Am Number Four vague and sloppy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    You've seen worse. The film industry is capable of better.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script avoids going full-bore as satire. Where it goes instead lacks a purpose, a reason for being, beyond the usual name-checking of "The X-Files" and the like.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's secondhand, vaguely resigned material. And while Sudeikis has some talent, he's not yet ready to co-anchor a feature comedy. He's no Ed Helms, in other words.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Rio
    The movie isn't dull, exactly; the problem lies in the other, antsy direction.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A smooth but frustrating third feature with an extremely good ensemble cast.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Green just isn't the superhero color this year.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I fear Spielberg and Jackson hitched their wagon to the wrong technological star here.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Seyfried's a good actress, but all the art direction in the world can't make this version of events the stuff either of dreams or of nightmares.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I didn't laugh much, nor did my 10-year-old companions, but nobody had their soul crushed by the experience. This is the film industry's Hippocratic oath: First, crush no souls.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Heartbreakingly average, director Robert Redford's The Conspirator errs in the way so many films do, especially films about unsung pieces of American history. It focuses on the wrong character.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Lasseter's sequel smooshes the vehicular ensemble of the first "Cars" into a nefarious James Bond universe, heavy on the missiles and ray guns and Gatling guns and electrocutions. Sound peculiar? It is peculiar.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is the "Babel" or "Crash" of ensemble romantic comedies, with screenwriter Dan Fogelman mapping out several narrative surprises that throw you for little loops as they're delivered.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Some comedies have the knack for affrontery and shock value; The Change-Up, written by the "Hangover" team of Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, merely has the will to offend.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I hope Green one day finds a way to bridge the style and rhythm of his early pictures (the ones that didn't make money) and the bumper-car approach of The Sitter.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's mostly noise and splurch and, as I mentioned, aaaaarrrrggggghhhhh!
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If more of the picture had the inventively grotesque payoff of the scene set at the gymnastics tryout, capped by a female character's inarguably poor dismount, we might have something to puke home about.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a film that feels hidebound. And nobody ever called a dance-driven movie "hidebound."
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The sequel's themes of friendship and interdependency fail to generate much momentum.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I suspect a lot of what I found synthetic and sort of galling in Real Steel will work just fine with the target audience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Although Joffe appears to be making a Brighton version of the seductively natty evil we find stateside in "Boardwalk Empire," this Brighton Rock remains muffled, half-formed pulp fiction.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Raven squanders a promising scenario while half-burying Cusack's mercurial skills as a leading man with the wiles of a character actor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is a gentle, diffident concoction. But it has barely enough pulse to power a hummingbird.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The cast is not the limitation here. The limitation, and I found it to be a drag on this aggressively audience-pleasing indie, relates directly to its premise.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not much to hijack. But playing a lovelorn version of himself, in love with Adam Sandler in a dress, a lisp and breasts, Al Pacino holds a gun to the head of the comedy Jack and Jill and says: I now pronounce you mine.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I always enjoy Elizondo; he has a way of elevating some pretty lame banter, and thanks to New Year's Eve he has his way all over again.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Dumb film; smart comedienne.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie's all right, if you can take its rampant artificiality - and I'm not even talking about Parton's face yet.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    What proved tasty in book form comes across a little more like work in the movie.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    You couldn't accuse the film of practicing what it preaches: careful stewardship of a precious resource.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    "The Bourne Identity." "The Bourne Supremacy." "The Bourne Ultimatum." And now, "The Pointless, Confused and Then, For the Last Half-Hour, Exciting Bourne Sequel, After a Fashion," more commonly known as The Bourne Legacy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a picture that is baldly manipulative yet weirdly sentimental, and while Considine (a fine actor) can write, he is capable also of writing dialogue you've heard before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    No better or worse than the average (and I mean average) time-filling sequel cranked out by other animation houses.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    John Carter isn't much - or rather, it's too much and not enough in weird, clumpy combinations - but it is a curious sort of blur.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie, full of talented performers in search of a more propulsive vehicle, settles for workmanlike cover-band status, which makes this a cover-band tribute to a jukebox musical - a long way from true, trashy exhilaration.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film is ruled by sound and fury signifying an attempt to launch a new franchise.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It sounds fun. It's a little fun. For a while. But Bekmanbetov shoots every killing spree like an addled gamer, working that slow-down-speed-up kill-shot cliche like a maniac.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Writer-director Silver, who trained in documentaries, appears flummoxed by the challenges of getting the audience inside the heads of these young men.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not very funny, but your kids might like it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ted
    You can find this clever, or you can find it lazy, and this is why MacFarlane is the biggest mixed blessing in contemporary TV comedy: He is both.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Doesn't know how to do what I think it's trying to do.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The glibness of Wiesen's freshman effort wouldn't be a problem if the wit was there.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The gentle erotic undertow in the friendship of Snow Flower and Lily has been toned down, and replaced by … niceness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Now and then the movie rouses itself to deliver. If you go to American Reunion - and many will, if they harbor fond memories of the first one, and if they can find a sitter - you should stay through the end credits.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The supporting players in Man on a Ledge bring more to the party than the leads, and my suspension of disbelief seems to have gotten hung up in traffic while attempting to cross the suspension-of-disbelief bridge from the Brooklyn side.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Without a strong narrative engine, Upside Down ends up exactly where it shouldn't go: sideways.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Dark Shadows illustrates the fine line in a pop reboot between "relaxed" and "lazy."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The directive behind this sequel, clearly, was non-stop action. Let's think about that phrase a second. Do we really want our action movies to deliver action that does not stop? Ever? I get a little tired of action sequences that won't stop.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I like Duhamel, and in her first straight-up dramatic role Hough does well enough, though her singing and/dancing career thus far has trained her to oversell, as opposed to sell, as opposed to act naturally.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By the two-hour mark the fun had oozed out of the movie for me. It's long. Or feels it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script is a mess. It's an object lesson in taking a nonfiction book ("The Feather Men," about a cadre of ex-British Special Air Service operatives) and making a hash of it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not as if Stone is above this sort of pulp. But as rejiggered for the movies, Savages has trouble making us care what happens to the beautiful people - the untouchables - at the center of the sun-baked fairy tale.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Oblivion is odder and less conventional than your average forgettable star vehicle; at times it feels like a five-character play taking place in a digital-effects lab. But there's not much energy to it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The action beats come straight out of the video game "Call of Duty." And when you have real SEALs placed in a picture that lives and dies on the same old first-person-shooter aesthetic, you have a film divided against itself.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    More than anything Minkoff's project feels like a protracted episode of "Jimmy Neutron," a show with characters for whom I don't have the same affection.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All the movie has, really, is Tilda Swinton acting up a storm, which is more than enough for some. For me, given what's up with the rest of the picture, it's not quite.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Red Tails squanders a great subject, reducing the real-life struggles and fierce heroics of the Tuskegee Airmen to rickety cliche.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The animated result isn't bad. It's an adequate baby sitter. But where's the allure in telling the truth? Twentieth Century Fox and Blue Sky Studios present "Adequate"?
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie's own brand of charm has its subset of smarm.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It sticks in the craw. The whole movie does.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Folks, I confess: I'm coping with a mild case of arachno-apatha-phobia, defined as the fear of another so-so "Spider-Man" sequel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Here and there, the actor invests the kind of feeling that makes The Way come alive in human terms.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie lacks wit.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The leads' chemistry in The Lucky One is more theoretical than actual. Still, the sunsets and sunrises and sunbeams through the windowpanes fall easily on the eyes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Absurdly brutal slapstick is a tough thing to sustain across a feature. I spent a lot of The Three Stooges staring, not laughing. For me this was a stare-out-loud affair.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A triumph of production design but a pretty dull kill-'em-up otherwise.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The pathos: considerable. The sight gags, involving Crystal puking chili dog on a kid's face, or the grandson with an imaginary friend peeing and causing an X Games skateboarder to wipe out: artless. The results: tolerably amusing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie strolls through its paces, sometimes amusingly, though by the end you've heard "Volare" and "Arrivederci Roma" reprised often enough to make you wish "Volare" and "Arrivederci Roma" had never been written.

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