Michael Phillips
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For 1,547 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Phillips' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Once
Lowest review score: 0 Chappie
Score distribution:
1,547 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    No better or worse than the average (and I mean average) time-filling sequel cranked out by other animation houses.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Feels constrained and rather dutiful, no matter how passionate these people are about what they're observing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    In Rendition Gyllenhaal is supposed to be the smartest one in the room, yet he’s essentially just a good-looking plodder. And despite its whirligig story machinations, so is Rendition.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All the astute acting in the world can’t bring such a preposterous story into the station on time and intact.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    You find yourself smiling at some of the bits, wincing through many, many others, and ultimately wondering if the pacing would've improved had either H or K developed a terrible cocaine habit.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    G.I. Joe may not be beefier, but it’s cheesier and less aggravating than "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen," the summer ’09 headbanger it most resembles.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The relative success or failure of Adult Beginners, directed with a steady, nonjudgmental hand by Ross Katz, depends on how funny you find Kroll. I find him funny-ish.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Crowe's feature directorial debut, The Water Diviner, stems from an honest impulse to dramatize ordinary people who honor their dead. Yet the results are narratively dishonest and emotionally a little cheap.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's a two-hour lesson in how to act like a frenemy to your alleged friends. And it's not funny enough.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    What are they trying to accomplish and is this really the best way to accomplish it?
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The best thing about this self-mocking affair, which runs a leisurely two-plus hours and affords plenty of time for an insane body count, is Antonio Banderas' manic gusto in the role of a gabby mercenary.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is passable comic book stuff, dumb and loud. Loud. LOUD.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Why isn’t the film better? Guggenheim doesn’t seem to have prodded his subjects in any interesting directions.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The sequel is a disappointing step down, and backward.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not a lousy experience. Taylor Swift shows up in a glorified cameo. Thwaites has promise; Rush has more than that. But for a movie decrying the concept of societal "sameness," The Giver is a hypocritical movie indeed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's not as if Stone is above this sort of pulp. But as rejiggered for the movies, Savages has trouble making us care what happens to the beautiful people - the untouchables - at the center of the sun-baked fairy tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Savage Grace comes up bland and seems to go nowhere in particular.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This debut picture never makes up its mind about what sort of comedy it wants to be. But at least it has one--a mind, that is.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Without a strong narrative engine, Upside Down ends up exactly where it shouldn't go: sideways.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Lasseter's sequel smooshes the vehicular ensemble of the first "Cars" into a nefarious James Bond universe, heavy on the missiles and ray guns and Gatling guns and electrocutions. Sound peculiar? It is peculiar.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    But even with the great good efforts of Wallis, the results, to some of us, betray a distrustworthy slickness reminiscent of a British Petroleum oil spill clean-up commercial.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ruthlessly skilled as Atkinson is, the Bean persona of generic, maniacally grinning ineptitude owes most of its appeal to seeing just how far an actor can pull a face without pulling a muscle.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    With a less pedigreed international cast the whole thing would be a disaster, as opposed to a chilly new kind of disaster film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    We're snowed by a great deal of intersecting and crisscrossing information in The Fifth Estate, and Singer's script lacks organizational skills. I can relate. But that doesn't make parsing this busy film, or — crucially — its true, contradictory feelings about Assange any easier.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ted
    You can find this clever, or you can find it lazy, and this is why MacFarlane is the biggest mixed blessing in contemporary TV comedy: He is both.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film isn't terrible; Vaughn, Pratt and, as David's frustrated girlfriend, Cobie Smulders know what they're doing in terms of finessing the material for laughs as well as the h-word. But it's all sort of unseemly.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Piven's performance basically made the series, and to the degree the new film works, which is a little, he makes that too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Missed it by that much. Actually, the new version of Get Smart misses by a fair-size margin.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's nice to see a movie in love with New York City, but That Awkward Moment sets such a low bar for Jason's redemption it becomes a drag.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If Rodriguez had any selectivity as an action director and a purveyor of garish thrills, the violence might have an impact beyond benumbing the spectator. "Sin City 2" keeps piling on, flipping the visual pages and selling the same ancient lessons in misogyny that real noir, or neo-noir, exploited yet transcended.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    More than anything Casa de mi Padre is an exercise - and to those who find it more clever than I do, a valid one - in tone-funny, as opposed to joke-funny.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    DePietro struggles to reconcile the perceived demands of the romantic comedy genre (though his film is more bittersweet than most) and the tang and hustle and detail of real life.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A chaotic headbanger, X-Men Origins: Wolverine is saved from pure flat-footed blockbuster franchise adequacy by six things, three of them on Hugh Jackman's left hand, three on his right.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Roughly the same as the first in terms of quality and style. It delivers without much visual dynamism, and with a determined emphasis on combat. In the 1951 novel the climactic battle between the good Narnians and the bad Telmarines lasted a few pages. The film version of the same battle feels like "The Longest Day."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Kate Winslet has such sound and reliable dramatic instincts (That Face doesn't hurt, either) she very nearly makes something of Adele.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The film is rarely dull; it's one life-and-death sequence after another, and the filmmaking's efficient, crisply delivered. But Eastwood honors his subject without really getting under his skin.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    With "Braveheart," "Passion" and now Apocalypto, Gibson clearly has established his priorities as a director. History is gore, plus a few hearthside family interludes. The trick is instilling the audience with enough rageful bloodlust to make the story work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    See the play sometime. It cooks; the movie's more of a microwave reheat.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    In sum it plays like 12 landlocked episodes of "The Love Boat" rammed together, though without the same rate of intercourse.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Half the time, Deliver Us From Evil is genuinely interested in Sarchie's all-too-human demons, and half the time we're marking time until the big exorcism and an ending that keeps the door open for a sequel, should the market demand it.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It sticks in the craw. The whole movie does.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Can a formidable actress redeem a pile of solemn erotic kitsch? Kate Winslet answers that one as honestly as she can in the film version of Bernhard Schlink's 1995 novel "The Reader."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is the "Babel" or "Crash" of ensemble romantic comedies, with screenwriter Dan Fogelman mapping out several narrative surprises that throw you for little loops as they're delivered.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Clean enough to fly the Walt Disney Pictures flag, yet it's full of bimbos and cleavage and shots of Adam Sandler getting kicked in the shins by a dwarf.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The results impart that "trapped" feeling all too well. It's a sullen affair, dominated by a grim visual palette that intrigues for about 30 minutes.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    They should've thrown everything away except the title and the outline. That's what the "Devil Wears Prada" creative team did, and that film turned out a lot richer than this one.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The best efforts of the performers cannot authenticate a plot that no longer feels inevitable. It feels contrived. And the audience stays at a remove instead of entering someone else’s nightmare.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While Brand manages a couple of effectively brutal bits of violence, Matthew Waynee's gassy screenplay is all premise and no propulsion.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It is a silly film about serious matters.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    New in Town is "The Pajama Game" without the songs, the laughs or the bare-knuckled realism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The best of Laggies, both in the writing and the playing, comes in the square-offs between Knightley and Rockwell.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    One wishes LaBute, a bleak satirist and, at his best, a crudely compelling dramatist, had taken the script and made it his own sort of twisted comedy instead of a routine thriller
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Red Tails squanders a great subject, reducing the real-life struggles and fierce heroics of the Tuskegee Airmen to rickety cliche.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    My Life in Ruins will neither ruin nor change nor significantly impact your life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While White plays it supercool, Tommy Davidson and Arsenio Hall (as Cream Corn and Tasty Freeze, respectively) swing for the fences, without much in the way of a bat.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    "The Bourne Identity." "The Bourne Supremacy." "The Bourne Ultimatum." And now, "The Pointless, Confused and Then, For the Last Half-Hour, Exciting Bourne Sequel, After a Fashion," more commonly known as The Bourne Legacy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A screwy assassination thriller for these murky times, it takes half its pages from Soldier of Fortune and the other half from links provided by conspiracytheories-zapoppin.org.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    While not autobiographical, The Kite Runner feels authentic in its ethnic tensions, even when the narrative itself, with its handily reappearing and easily avenged villain, undermines that authenticity.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A triumph of production design but a pretty dull kill-'em-up otherwise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    If it gets people thinking about which light bulbs they buy and their current gas mileage and such, then it's good to have it in the world. It is, however, a panicky blur as documentaries go.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    There's really no other word for what Helen Mirren is doing in certain reaction shots, out of subtle interpretive desperation: mugging. She's mugging. She is a sublimely talented performer, and this is material with fascinating implications, and I doubt there's a moviegoer in the world who doesn't like Helen Mirren. But even the best actors need a director to tell them to tone it down.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I laughed here and there at She's Out of My League, but I sort of hated everything it had to say about nerds and babes and the sliding scale of self-image.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The flaw in Death of a President isn't one of morality. It's one of dramatic interest.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Boxtrolls remains relentlessly busy up through its final credits, and it's clever in a nattering way. But it's virtually charmless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Next Day Air is sort of bracing, though it isn't very good: Its total lack of dramatic and comic bearings, to say nothing of a point, keeps you wondering about the next fatality, in a half-interested way.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    For an hour or so The Equalizer glides along and works; in the second hour, plus change, it turns into a shameless slaughter contrivance with a flabby sense of pace. I did like one line: "When you pay for rain, you gotta deal with the mud too." Washington's the rain; by the end, the movie is the mud.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie doesn't really work, but the jet boots would be the envy of Iron Man, and they allow our hero, unwisely named Caine Wise, to speedskate through the air, leaving pretty little trails of light over downtown Chicago.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a picture that is baldly manipulative yet weirdly sentimental, and while Considine (a fine actor) can write, he is capable also of writing dialogue you've heard before.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    An average franchise re-launch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script avoids going full-bore as satire. Where it goes instead lacks a purpose, a reason for being, beyond the usual name-checking of "The X-Files" and the like.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Beyond Affleck's, the performances here lack amplitude and dramatic impact.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The script is a mess. It's an object lesson in taking a nonfiction book ("The Feather Men," about a cadre of ex-British Special Air Service operatives) and making a hash of it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Secretariat isn't bad but it's precisely what you'd expect.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The heartbreaking thing about Meet Dave...is its occasional funniness amid a sea of pablum. If it were completely rank, it'd be less frustrating.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Proposal reworks "Two Weeks Notice" with the genders switched.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The most vivid aspect of The Eye is its poster image, that of a huge female eye with a human hand gripping the lower lid from the inside. The least vivid aspect is the way Jessica Alba delivers a simple line of expository dialogue.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Oblivion is odder and less conventional than your average forgettable star vehicle; at times it feels like a five-character play taking place in a digital-effects lab. But there's not much energy to it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Evil Dead offers the core audience for modern horror plenty of reasons to jump, and then settle back, tensely, while awaiting the next idiotic trip down to the cellar beneath the demon-infested cabin in the woods.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Swanberg may be one of the few American filmmakers who'd benefit from reading one of those "10 Rules for Mediocre Hollywood Screenwriting" how-to books. Many find a kind of truth and life and rough domestic magic in his films. Here and there, now and then, I see what they're talking about.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A massive and rather tiring showcase for Bollywood action hero Akshay Kumar.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Extraordinarily raunchy, occasionally funny.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    When everything and anything is possible, nothing feels urgent or truly dramatic. The movie devolves into a melange of digital effects and sequences of glamorous slaughter, as Lucy swaggers around, with that big brain, and slouches toward becoming a full-lipped deity.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The pathos: considerable. The sight gags, involving Crystal puking chili dog on a kid's face, or the grandson with an imaginary friend peeing and causing an X Games skateboarder to wipe out: artless. The results: tolerably amusing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The emotions and crises feel pre-sanded, smooth to the point of blandness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Enough with the snatching, already.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The results are boring boring.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This is a gentle, diffident concoction. But it has barely enough pulse to power a hummingbird.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By the second hour of The Battle of the Five Armies, the visual approach becomes a paradox: monotonously dynamic epic storytelling.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I didn't half-mind Fired Up, but half a mind is more than it deserves.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The result is a film that feels hidebound. And nobody ever called a dance-driven movie "hidebound."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The acting is quite deft, if extremely broad, but screenwriter Kundo Koyama seesaws uncertainly between jokes and grief.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    This one's likely to vex both history buffs and those who require some drama with their drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Apted and his collaborators are so in awe of their subject they neglect to bring him to full human life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The Raven squanders a promising scenario while half-burying Cusack's mercurial skills as a leading man with the wiles of a character actor.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The animated result isn't bad. It's an adequate baby sitter. But where's the allure in telling the truth? Twentieth Century Fox and Blue Sky Studios present "Adequate"?
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The slapstick is crudely executed. And the movie never makes up its mind regarding how nasty the ghost of Kate is going to play her revenge tactics.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    After seeing No Reservations you'll be hungry for a really top-flight meal. And, to go with it, a better film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Ashes of Time Redux remains a hermetic and rather frustrating work, dotted by lonely, windblown figures dwarfed by the sand dunes of western China.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie expresses honest concern for the plight of so many newcomers to America, legal or illegal. What it lacks is moment-to-moment credibility.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Kline took on Douglas Fairbanks in Richard Attenborough's "Chaplin" and Cole Porter in Irwin Winkler's "De-Lovely"; he's the go-to biopic ace for roles requiring some fizz, a certain droll elevation and hair parted and slicked-back just so.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie's own brand of charm has its subset of smarm.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Aubrey Plaza is so deadpan she's undeadpan, and not just in her new zombie movie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I hope Green one day finds a way to bridge the style and rhythm of his early pictures (the ones that didn't make money) and the bumper-car approach of The Sitter.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The generic bulk of Divergent hits its marks and moves on.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Striving for low-key character comedy, Diminished Capacity ends up diminishing its returns.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Writer-director Silver, who trained in documentaries, appears flummoxed by the challenges of getting the audience inside the heads of these young men.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Turns out to be nothing special. Well, the music is. The storytelling is not.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The very elements of Eat Pray Love that helped make it a success in 40 languages -- the breezy prose, the relentless sorting-through of dissatisfactions, a steady stream of intriguing sights -- turn the film into a travelogue with a little spiritual questing on the side.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Legendary is so intent on paying heartfelt tribute to dogged young athletes that it neglects basic story needs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By the two-hour mark the fun had oozed out of the movie for me. It's long. Or feels it.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The only people humiliated, really, are older people and heavy people and nerds and vegans and black people and mothers who breast-feed their 4-year-olds. Everybody else gets a pass.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    At one point Rourke delivers a monologue about his time in Bosnia, and the conviction the actor brings to the occasion throws the movie completely out of whack. What's actual acting doing in a movie like this?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Screen chemistry between two individuals isn't really a pass/fail proposition. There are degrees involved. But let's pretend otherwise and say yes, Smith and Robbie pass, barely, with less than flying colors and in a pretty dull movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Duchovny and Moore have their moments; they're like two preening sharks working on commission.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All in all? A curious preachment yarn for peace, one which makes you wonder if the filmmakers couldn't wait to get to the climactic aerial dogfights.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Seyfried's a good actress, but all the art direction in the world can't make this version of events the stuff either of dreams or of nightmares.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Too much of the contrasting comedy in Nanny McPhee Returns is shrill, laden with routine computer-generated effects and pounded into dust by James Newton Howard's shut-up-already musical score.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Strives to be nothing more than easygoing and heartwarming.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A surer hand behind the camera might’ve finessed the jokes more effectively, or established a consistent and satisfying tone.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    A dramatic true story has been made into a diffident biopic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The cast is not the limitation here. The limitation, and I found it to be a drag on this aggressively audience-pleasing indie, relates directly to its premise.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Dumb film; smart comedienne.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie’s partially redeemed by Seyfried, who makes her character more than a repository for audience sympathy. (Her make-out scene with Fox is handled with more suspense and care than anything else in the movie.)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Outside the bedroom, the wartime swirl of intrigue never develops beyond postcard imagery, however. This is one of the major disappointments of the film-going year.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The story is both a muddle and a drag.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It's the big stuff that doesn't really work, at least well enough to be called special.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Allen is obsessed with the notion of getting away with murder, mulling over which personalities can shoulder the psychological burden of killing without remorse, while others crumble under the pressure. The problem is, you don’t feel the human sweat and strain in Cassandra’s Dream, despite game work from Farrell and McGregor.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Church is most at home in his character’s skin; aside from the game but strident Quaid, all the leading players are ideally cast. It’s the script that isn’t ideally cast.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    To say The Paperboy doesn't work is one thing; to say it's dull is a lie. This movie is berserk, which is more interesting than "eh."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Clean, precise and terribly sullen, After.Life is like its female protagonist. It feels stuck between worlds, or genres.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    By today's standards, it is only medium-bloody, though it's more than usually grim, its young protagonists sullen enough to qualify for the "Twilight" movies. Yet it affords precious little sadistic pleasure, partly because it "dares" to lay out more directly the pedophiliac demons plaguing Freddy the serial killer.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Much as I enjoy the actors I didn't buy a word or frame of Arthur Newman.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie wants it both ways: bloodthirsty revenge and some finger-wagging about the tactics.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Routine cinema but rich history.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The movie's all right, if you can take its rampant artificiality - and I'm not even talking about Parton's face yet.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    The dialogue can drive you crazy with its self-consciousness.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    I always enjoy Elizondo; he has a way of elevating some pretty lame banter, and thanks to New Year's Eve he has his way all over again.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    Even when Eastwood and Robertson, pleasant enough company, threaten to float off the screen, The Longest Ride glides along and delivers its reheated comfort food by the ton.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    All the movie has, really, is Tilda Swinton acting up a storm, which is more than enough for some. For me, given what's up with the rest of the picture, it's not quite.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    It’s a little “Karate Kid,” a smidge of “Fight Club” (with none of the ironic ambivalence toward violence that David Fincher brought to that story), a lot of “The O.C.” (evil boy Gigandet played an evil boy on that series), and presto: probable hit.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Phillips
    One of the problems with the new comedy Run, Fat Boy, Run is that it’s not English enough, even though its antagonist is a thoroughly detestable American go-getter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Silly, sadistic and finally a little galling, Kingsman: The Secret Service answers the question: What would Colin Firth have been like if he'd played James Bond?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's a seriously withholding action comedy, stingy on the wit, charm, jokes, narrative satisfactions and animals with personalities sharp enough for the big screen, either in 2-D or 3-D.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A movie just begging to go up in the flames of camp. If only somebody had brought a match.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Broken Horses raises the question of what is cockamamie, and what is cockamamie and outlandish and ridiculous yet a perfectly swell time for those very reasons. This one's just cockamamie without the swell part.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Only the architecturally refined bone structure of Kristin Scott Thomas' face rescues Keeping Mum from full-on tedium.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The Last Airbender (they couldn't use the series' "Avatar" title because another film got there first, without all the bending) is more about marshaling extras and interpolating tons of computer-generated effects and keeping the factions straight. It's a tough sit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Ritchie, who shoots and cuts everything in RocknRolla like an ad for a particularly greasy brand of fragrance for men, delivers the beatings and killings in his trademark atmosphere of morally weightless flash.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    There’s nothing wrong with All About Steve that a rewrite couldn’t fix, as long as the rewrite involved a different writer, a different character and a different story.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The Good German is just stiff. When Soderbergh tries one of those patented swoop-in-on-the-diagonal moves at a key dramatic moment, the effect is comic. And at that precise moment, the story starts dying a slow, oxygen-deprived death.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Reveals a flash or two of real filmmaking (mostly in a suggestively grotesque birthing sequence), enough to save it from pure lousiness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The wastrel Sparrow ends up both overexploited and underpowered in this fourth outing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The film is perfectly mediocre, which is heartbreaking, not heartwarming.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The choicest dialogue in Burlesque provokes the sort of laughter that other, intentionally funny films only dream of generating.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Despite honorable work from Theron, Robb and Stahl, Sleepwalking makes good on its title in a not-so-good way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    How big a bastard can Woody Allen build a screenplay around and still generate a modicum of audience goodwill? The answer: not this big.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A work of ineffable soullessness and persistent moral idiocy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's a serious drag to see how Ritchie has turned Holmes and Dr. Watson into a couple of garden-variety thugs.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Ferrell may well shoulder the blame for Land of the Lost, even if he doesn't deserve it. He did, however, willingly participate in this coarse, sloppy big-screen version of the old Saturday-morning time-warp adventure.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's all very "Scarface"--the De Palma remake of "Scarface," not the Hawks original. In other words, it doesn't feel modern at all. It feels about a generation late and 400 years short.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Hangover II is more like a spitball meeting, a series of ideas that might, in theory, be good enough for a sequel, than it is an actual movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Doesn't provoke bittersweet inquiries regarding one poor actress' grisly fate. Nor does it stir up much provocation on the matter of why, as a popular audience, we're still taken with this lurid symbol of sex and dread and desire. Rather, the movie raises a much simpler question: Huh?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Diane Keaton--now there’s a trouper for you. She will not be caught giving less than 110 percent, even in a drab little heist comedy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    I enjoyed Eliza Dushku's mad poetess, probably for the wrong reasons, but with a project this meager, you take your artful sneers and scenic diversions where you can get them.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Their (The Brothers Strause) effects are pretty good, on a fairly limited budget. And that's about all you can say for Skyline.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Fox's cleavage is the only camera object that catches Bay's attention for more than a millisecond.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The stalwart American hero of Turistas comes off as a dislikable blank in the hands of Josh Duhamel, of the TV series "Las Vegas." More relaxed is Melissa George, who co-stars as the Aussie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The overall vibe of this folly is curdled and utterly blase; it's a 118-minute foregone conclusion, finesse-free and perilously low on the simple performance pleasures we look for in any musical, of any period.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    As robust and clever an actor as Cox is, he can't make Jacques any less of a blowhard; Kari's wit simply doesn't come through in English, at least with this script.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The movie itself is hyperactive and a jumble.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's no better, no worse and essentially no different from the jocular, clodhopping brutality of the first one.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    I wish The Boy Next Door were a different, zingier sort of mediocrity, but whenever it threatens to go the full Zalman King "Two Moon Junction" route, it pulls back and behaves itself and settles for a grindingly predictable series of escalations.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The sole memorable scene involving a little Focker in Little Fockers, though memorable doesn't mean amusing, involves Ben Stiller's male-nurse character administering a needle full of adrenaline to his dyspeptic and unhappily aroused father-in-law Jack Byrnes, played by Robert De Niro.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    All you want from a movie like this, really, is a little brainless fun, and it keeps holding out on you. Everyone looks fatigued. Even Cage’s toupee seems ambivalent about having signed on for a sequel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The tragedy is that the performance comes to nothing. Nearly everything else in the film is vile.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Nobody watches a disaster movie starring digital tornadoes expecting Oscar Wilde. But Into the Storm, directed with bland efficiency by Steven Quayle of "Final Destination 5," reminds us that unless a movie establishes certain base-line levels of human interest, it runs the not-unentertaining risk of coming out squarely in favor of its own bad weather.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Line to line, Stallone has a particularly numbing penchant for the f-word. But the key f-word in Homefront is "familiar."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    An exhaustingly pushy, phallocentric and witlessly smutty spoof of early '80s medieval fantasies such as "Krull" and "The Beastmaster."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    If the writers had the guts (and the jokes) to fashion a bittersweet comedy with a fully earned happy ending, Unaccompanied Minors probably wouldn't have been made. As is, it's a prefab slapstick-'n'-pathos stew that doesn't taste like anything.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Numbingly gory when it isn’t just plain numbing.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    We have to take the sexual tension on faith, as with everything in this formulaic glob of a script.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Hanna presents the problem of the well-made diversion that is, at its core, repellent.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The scenery's nice. But once you've said the scenery's nice, you're no longer talking about a movie worth talking about.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    On the whole, I'd rather be on Pluto, which isn't even a planet.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Davis, in particular, manages to create a fully dimensional character in the midst of a highly polemical screenplay.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    After the insufferably dense mermaid mythology of "Lady in the Water," Shyamalan clearly wanted to keep things simple. He whizzed straight past "simple" to simplistic.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Seven Pounds has a heart as big as all outdoors. Unfortunately it's made out of high-fructose bull.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The most excellent and lamentable tragedy Romeo and Juliet has been turned into a film that is lamentable without the "excellent" part.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Not even Smith's charisma can mitigate the chaos that is Hancock.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Freshman Orientation is not incompetently made. Nor is it badly acted. But there’s not a fresh idea in it, and everyone on screen seems to be in a different comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The revenge in Oldboy is neither sweet nor sour; it's just drab.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    When Jason Sudeikis and Ed Helms appear in the same movie there's a significant threat of clean-cut sameness. Mediocre material makes them like two halves of the same comic actor: Ed Jason Helms-Sudeikis.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Dempsey's pleasant enough, but he hasn't yet learned how to play against a mediocre script's obviousness. Monaghan has, which is gratifying.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A coming-of-ager that nearly slaughters you by minute 30 with the relentlessness of its protagonist's voiceovers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Calling Dredd 3D a movie is sort of a lie. It's a premise, and there are levels to reach, and always there's another grimy hallway to stalk, and then you turn right or left, and then kill some more.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Levinson has written and directed in many genres. But rarely has he made a film as indecisive and diffident as Man of the Year.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The latest, Untraceable, owes everything to “Lambs,” and to “Se7en,” and to all the “Lambs” and “Se7en” knockoffs made by directors less talented than Jonathan Demme and David Fincher. In addition to being dull, the Portland, Ore. -set Untraceable is a monster hypocrite, wagging its finger at the mass audience’s appetite for strictly regimented, “creative” torture scenarios.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It is, for what it is, a work of considerable care and craft. And it's completely soulless.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Salerno blows little more than smoke in this one, especially near the end, when we get to the maybe-probably-sort-ofs regarding the maybe-probably-possibly full vault of unpublished work.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Take Me Home Tonight, believe me, you've already seen.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The camera bobs and weaves like a drunk, frantically. So you have hammering close-ups, combined with woozy insecurity each time more than two people are in the frame. Twenty minutes into the retelling of fugitive Valjean, his monomaniacal pursuer Javert, the torch singers Fantine and Eponine and the rest, I wanted somebody to just nail the damn camera to the ground.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Astonishingly, Angels & Demons IS the same sort of lumbering mediocrity.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Bride Wars really does not capture the mood of the moment. It comes from a different time, a different planet.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A remake for schlemiels, or at least easy marks when it comes to formulaic Hollywood comedy. But the film's peculiar sluggishness and nagging hypocrisy probably won't get in the way of its popularity.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Ludicrous and overstuffed, it plows through the Big 10 of Biblical plagues.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Moving slowly these days, Reynolds does less than no acting in this role, and he’s still the best thing in Deal.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Director Burr Steers milks them dry, like an overeager farmer at milking time, which is a paradox since this is the wettest picture of 2010, what with the sea spray and Efron's tear ducts and the general metaphysical mist.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The court scenes are rarely funny, either in the trash talk or the slapstick.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Everything's at stake yet nothing comes to much in Terminator Genisys.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Hutcherson spits his lines out as quickly as possible, which you appreciate, because the way the likable Johnson wrestles with his lines ("It looks like the liquefaction has tripled overnight!") you think, well, it's a living.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Terrible but, in its squealing way, sporadically fun-terrible.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The film suggests Lohan probably (allegedly) should've gone after her agent the other night, not the mother of an ex-personal assistant.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Madonna stayed married to director Guy Ritchie just long enough to absorb his most grating cinematic instincts - shooting in every style, in an addled, shuffle-mode, falsely glamorizing way until all is chaos. And, astonishingly, boredom.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A clammy little number that might've been funded by the Department of Homeland Security.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Black or White may not be racist, exactly, but it patronizes its African-American characters up, down and sideways, and audiences of every ethnicity, background, hue and predilection can find something to dislike.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Gimme Shelter suffers from an acute case of the fakes. The speeches sound like speeches, and not good ones.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Lapica isn't yet enough of a writer or director (or an actor) to make the dramatic arc unpredictable in any way. It may be effective for some as therapy. It is far less so as cinematic storytelling.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Staggers and wanders and feels far longer than its 85 minutes, and it's best considered a calling card for better things to come.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Sex Tape settles for violence when violent slapstick, a lot harder to finesse, was the implicit goal of the picture.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    CJ7
    CJ7 is roughly as grating as that “Flubber” remake.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The poster’s the funniest thing about the project: Johnson, sporting a pair of fairy wings larger than his forearms, glaring at the camera.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Despite valiant efforts from Czerny and from the fine stage actress Vilma Silva, who plays one of Walsch's many saviors, the result would qualify as a blandly inspirational amateur hour if the running time weren't closer to two.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's reductive, insanely violent slapstick, but that's the phenomenon in a nutshell.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Williams' grimace is starting to look desperate. Then again, no one comes off well in director Ken Kwapis' handling of this greasy screenplay.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The screenplay by Dana Fox (she was one of the rewriters of "27 Dresses") devolves into a series of humiliating pranks that always give the upper narrative hand to the male lead. Talk about depressing. I mean, that's what male screenwriters are for--to unfairly stack the deck against the female leads.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Not so much character-driven as character-dragged--against its will.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The Incredible Burt Wonderstone serves as a reminder that everything in a film has a chance to go wrong before a film begins filming. In other words: It's the script, stupid.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Boasts one moment, perhaps three or four seconds in length, so delightfully intense and uncharacteristically juicy that the rest of the film - most of the rest of the whole series, in fact - looks pretty pale by comparison. Not vampire pale. Paler.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Gordon is lost, and his style of shooting - telescopic close-ups, which never give us enough space to appreciate the performers - feels wrong for comedy.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Director Monteverde, whose previous feature, "Bella," came out nine years ago, clearly meant his film to lift up everyone and condescend to no one, least of all Pepper and Hashimoto. But Little Boy comes off as a picture-postcard fake.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A weak romantic comedy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Maybe this review is more about me than about Conan O'Brien, but I really couldn't get past the odor of self-congratulation emanating from nearly every scene in Conan O'Brien Can't Stop.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Certain scenes in When in Rome signify nothing less than the death of screen slapstick, but I’m hoping it’s one of those fake-out movie deaths where it’s not really dead, not forever.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The appeal of the film version, such as it is, relates almost entirely to eye-for-an-eye, severed-limb-for-a-limb vengeance, two hours and 41 minutes of it, with just enough solemnity to make anyone who thought "The Dark Knight" was a little gassy think twice about which superhero myth THEY'RE calling gassy.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Feels about 150 years out of date.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    This material is offensive. The film may end with a straight-faced reassurance that "no actual Torah scrolls were destroyed or damaged in the making of this motion picture," but it's perfectly willing to exploit the Holocaust for cheap, weak thrills.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    For me, the mechanics or even the (excellent) designs are not enough. Jeunet's archness keeps conventional empathy or engagement at bay, and by design maintains a tone of artificiality.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Knight and Day may well suffice for audiences desperate for the bankable paradox known as the predictable surprise, and willing to overlook a galumphing mediocrity in order to concentrate on matters of dentistry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    This is a fantasy grab bag in which nearly anything can happen.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Only Biel and Greer lift it above the level of bleh.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    I wish the movie made emotional sense, because it’s all about getting in touch with whatever’s holding you back, but it doesn’t.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It may well be a hit, but me, I'm waiting for "Iron Man 2."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Easy Virtue may be a bauble, as Larita's described at one point, but Coward's examination of hypocrisy demands real skill. The style should suggest "whipped cream with knives," as Stephen Sondheim once described "A Little Night Music." Elliott's film is more like curdled milk with a spork.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    "The Misadventurer" is more like it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The acting's not the problem, and it's a nice thing to find Moore playing a human-scaled human being, with a recognizable human touch. The material has a hint of it too. But only a hint.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    How much of what we see in Third Person is the novelist's invention is part of the guessing game that goes on and on. And. On.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The line between cool and cold is a thin one, however. Cool isn't the word for "Thirteen"; it's just smug.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The storytelling proceeds in such a halting manner, with De Niro's speeches going on and on and on, that before long you'd kill for an easy scare.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Because The Campaign tries to say something about truth vs. hogwash in election season, it's doubly sad the efforts of screenwriters Chris Henchy and Shawn Harwell come to so little.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's rather sweet to think of Filth and Wisdom as Madonna's reconnection to her own boho Manhattan striver self a generation ago, and I did enjoy the last five minutes or so, when the movie essentially stopped and Hutz's band, Gogol Bordello, took over.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It wanders and putters and follows its main characters around.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Aiming for a piece with the raw impact of "Precious," on which he served as executive producer, he (Perry) ends up with 134 minutes of misjudged intensity.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    If actors this good cannot overcome their material, then we can only say: Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock … Max von Sydow, Zoe Caldwell, Viola Davis, Jeffrey Wright, John Goodman… thanks for your honest efforts in the service of a fundamentally dishonest weepie.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Most of the ingredients for a strong, tough film are there, and they have been sadly botched by a few key collaborators.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's passable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The movie's heart, of course, is with poor addled Mike and his kids, but 17 Again works only fitfully to make the Efron/Perry character worth a story.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Stranded in this charmless fantasy, Stiller is reduced to his old halting, squirming tricks.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    What could have been a juicy, pulpy noir, based loosely on the real-life 1976 Mustang Ranch love triangle involving Joe and Sally Conforte and Sally's boxer paramour, instead has the dramatic consistency of rice milk.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Formulaic romantic junk.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The Love Guru”does not bring out Myer's best, and aside from a deft early Bollywood parody, there’s nothing visually to help the fun along.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The pathos really are shameless, arriving with killing regularity and false humility.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Isn't just the weakest of the "Die Hard" pictures; it's a lousy action movie on its own terms.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's tough to get on board with these monsters. They don't get the banter they--or we--deserve, and the screenwriters lean on wearying stereotypes.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    This is “True Lies” without the striptease or the Arab-maiming.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The slapstick is awful; the pathos isn't much better, though it's far more plentiful.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The film is a fancy-pants muddle in terms of technique. And if Bloom doesn't do something about his smirky tendency to troll for audience approval, his career may be severely limited.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Black Snake Moan strikes me as hogwash. It fundamentally does not work; its consciously far-fetched, out-there notions of the things damaged people do in the name of love are reductive and go only so far. It's as if the premise were tethered to a radiator or something.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Calling a sequel Are We Done Yet? is like calling it "Enough Already."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Writer-director Thom Fitzgerald's ambitious but hopelessly inchoate AIDS drama is actually three separate, sequentially-told stories.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The film has one objective: to smack its audience in the face with fleeting, competing wows, over and over.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Hit & Run is pretty rancid as comedy. Worse, the chases are strictly amateur hour, all shortcut editing and no gut satisfaction.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A mild and static attempt at sincere camp.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    A lot of the rougher stuff, depicting Ig's late-inning vengeance, is sadistically misjudged. It's hard to jerk tears a beat or two after gleeful rounds of brutality, even if it happens to, or because of, dear wee Daniel Radcliffe.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Jumper, the film, goes everywhere and nowhere.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    As generic as its title, College Road Trip feels like a first draft, the one the studio brings to the rewrite team that, in this case, never got hired.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Carell's pal and "Daily Show" colleague Jon Stewart has a cameo as himself, one of a chorus of godless media star non-believers who do not see God's larger plan for Evan. Yes, well. At least "The Daily Show" is funny.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The pacing throughout is languid. Your eye becomes fixated on the hideous 70s wallpaper behind them. If only the story's interstellar narrative developments had the intensity of that wallpaper. Rod Serling might've gotten a great hour out of it (the story, that is, not the wallpaper). It simply is not two hours' worth, no matter how many quantum leaps into the unknown Kelly takes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    It's Bay World. And after an hour of Pain & Gain, it felt more like "Pain & Pain."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    Here and there, in the father/son scenes, you see a glimmer of an honest interaction. All in all, I'd rather watch a "Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide" rerun.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The events of the movie may be a little bit true, or a lot, but hardly any of it plays that way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    The first "H&K" caught people off-guard with its canny idiocy and zigzagging, picaresque treasure hunt premise. By now, there's no catching anyone off-guard with these two, except by way of the most off-color and off-putting means possible.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Michael Phillips
    I find Lars and the Real Girl adorable in the worst way, bailed out only by most every member of its excellent cast.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    It's miscast, barely functional in terms of technique, stupid and unnecessary. Other than that….
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Just the same auld same auld.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    A buddy cop film in which one of the cops continually quotes dialogue espoused by fictional cops, in everything from "Heat" to "RoboCop," and not once is it funny.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    A half-silly, half-earnest indie with the soul of a John Hughes-era sex comedy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Yogi Bear gives cheap hackwork a bad name. Which is a shame, because hackwork made this industry.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Watching Heather Graham, Tom Cavanagh and a stridently adorable Alan Cumming do their wide-eyed, moony thing in the romantic comedy Gray Matters raises the question: Is it possible for a filmgoer to be twinkled to death?
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Pure, witless discombobulation.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Only Sarah Paulson, as the Spirit's doctor and sometime lover, seems to be in there playing the scenes as if she were a human being in a comic book superhero scenario, as opposed to a comic book character stuck in a cruddy movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Offers only one point of interest beyond the breasts of its second female lead: Aniston's barely disguised disdain for her material.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Kathy Baker, as Burden's elegantly sodden mother, shows the only sign of interpretive life in this stiff-jointed enterprise. She has about five minutes on screen; she's lucky that way.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    It sets a tone, all right. A lot of gamers (sorry, "filmgoers") may well enjoy writer-director Michael Davis' ultraviolent lark. It's not meant to be taken seriously. But films like this are worth taking seriously because they're genuinely cruddy and hollow and, yes, vile.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    This movie is crushingly ordinary in every way, which with Rand I wouldn't have thought possible.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    It's the neediest movie of 2011, and one of the phoniest.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    In scenes such as hundreds of Natives being slaughtered by U.S. troops behind Gatling guns, we have Tonto and the Lone Ranger acting like a couple of comic-relief ninnies, screwing around aimlessly for laughs on a handcar. It's as if the movie were having a nervous breakdown. At one point the masked man gets his head dragged through horse manure. Watching The Lone Ranger, you know the feeling.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    This latest version is le pits.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    Not-funniest comedy of the year so far.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    A whopper this isn't. It's not even a Whopper Junior. It's the paper the Whopper Junior came in.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Michael Phillips
    The aftereffects of watching Lockout include an inability to focus or to complete a simple declarative sentence without an ill-timed cutaway in the middle.

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