Michael Wilmington

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For 1,282 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 76% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 22% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Wilmington's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 A Woman Is a Woman
Lowest review score: 0 Chaos
Score distribution:
1282 movie reviews
    • 25 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    One of those movies that starts like a house afire, catches you firmly in its narrative grip and then suddenly blows itself out, not really going out with a whimper but with a big, bad, ludicrous bang.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Heartbreakers itself is something of a con game: an expensive imitation of older, better films from older, often better times.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Possession needs a sharp eye, a wicked tongue, less reverence and much more of its author's voice.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's another slick-and-quick muscle car of a movie, racing along for a couple of hours, taking you nowhere as fast as it can.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    In some ways it's not a film that surprises us much. But it's a notable directorial debut anyway -- smartly written, very well cast and skillfully done.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Most of Frailty is so good -- done in a low-key, realistic mood of genuine creepiness and dread -- that it doesn't need formula shocks.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A movie meant to explode off the screen -- and it's at its best when those explosions are going full blast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    If you're in the mood for something strange, this film may please you, twice over.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The role sounds like a sentimental trap, but Penn doesn't fall into it. It's a sensational performance, and he illumines a movie that sometimes seems in danger of descending into modish Hollywood political correctness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The whole film, in fact, seems too fast for its own good. It plays like a synopsis, jumping from scene to scene, grief to grief, and it doesn't let us relax into the various worlds it's creating.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie, one of those surprise-twist detective stories, doesn't really stand up to scrutiny in the cold light of the theater lobby.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Though I wouldn't call He Loves Me a total success, it's smart, intriguing and quite ambitious, a first film by a talented young filmmaker that displays superstar Tautou's gifts in an eerie new light.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Its fascination may be limited to those already very familiar with his works and collaborators - and his sensual, highly subjective style.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A real sentimental journey -- and luckily they've got both the right director (Darabont) and the right actor to squeeze our heartstrings.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie doesn't really jell. Glossy, good-looking and well-produced, it affects you and even sometimes moves you, but it doesn't really convincingly connect.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    By turns brilliant and simplistic, moving and preposterous, the movie takes one of the ultimate hot-button American issues -- the morality of capital punishment -- and dissolves it into a volatile mix of psychological thriller and socio-political fable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    There is a thrill in seeing them wooing and pursuing each other through the streets of New York, a city that here again, for a while, becomes a movie isle of joy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's the equivalent of our "Gone With the Wind," Russia's "War and Peace" or, to take a more modest example, South Korea's "Chunhyang." Sheer ambition and grandiose make the film interesting -- up to a point.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This new heist movie by the great thriller director John Frankenheimer flails around like its own dysfunctional gang of casino robbers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This is a better movie than the vacuous "Insurrection," thanks largely to a sympathetic screenwriter, longtime "Trek" fanatic John Logan ("Gladiator"), and a crew (headed by Patrick Stewart's Capt. Jean-Luc Picard and Brent Spiner's android Data) determined to go out in glory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a shapeless, derivative-but-funny show with another loony parody plot about super-villain Dr. Evil.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Has the unfortunate effect of overtipping the dramatic scales in favor of the Southern generals and turning almost everybody into waxen idols who spout flowery rhetoric.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Louiso has a confident touch and a good eye, and there isn't a scene in the film that wasn't intelligently done. Besides Hoffman's near-great performance as Joel, there isn't a bad or mediocre acting job on view either.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    All too obvious, all too easy, the sort of tongue-in-chic L.A. comedy that mistakes glibness for high style, heartfelt pop choruses for wisdom.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The kind of movie that gives sequels a bad name, even though, strangely enough, it's better than the 1995 hit that spawned it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Unlike other current D.C. types, Elle would never misplace or misidentify her own weapons of mass destruction. They're all in her wardrobe closet and makeup kit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie overflows with action, slapstick and cliches, but the cliches never impede the action, and the slapstick is so expertly performed, it doesn't annoy you -- much.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    What's wrong is the decision to let all the actors improvise their lines...At the end, Irreversible looks less like captured or even distorted life than an acting class.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Carrera's style is hard-hitting, lucid and technically superior (if unimaginative). El Crimen del Padre Amaro eventually moves and stirs you, even if it often resembles those steamy Mexican TV dramas/soap operas called telenovelas.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Another of many recent Hollywood plotless wonders.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    At least the movie Pirates of the Caribbean is fun -- but only as long as you don't expect much. Take it from me: The ride is better.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Slender but surprisingly smart and pleasing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    An epic unhinged, and while its best sections suggest a Loony Tune done by Sam Peckinpah and Emilio Fernandez, "Mexico" needs to be even crazier than it is.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's stylish, it's sort of smart, it's full of misplaced talent. But it's not funny enough, and maybe, in a way, not dark enough either.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Despite intelligent, sympathetic direction by Gordon, a brilliant lead performance by Robert Downey Jr. and an adapted script written by Potter himself before his 1991 death, this "Detective" pales next to its predecessor.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    There's something light and insubstantial about this movie. It almost floats away as you watch it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The Statement is an older man's film, and compassion is one of its strengths; Jewison and Caine make us feel pity and terror for the victims as well.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The men here are negligible, but all the actresses are good -- especially Dunst, who shows a previously unrevealed gift for blending cold conservative roots, starchy appearance, forgiveness and unexpected redemption.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Though one can question the movie's quality as a documentary -- Broomfield is a dogged but often annoying interviewer, and Churchill's photography is sometimes slapdash -- Aileen raises such troubling issues that it stays, hellishly, in your mind.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This time around, the razors are a little duller, the clicks not as slick, the patter not as snappy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    More spirit and grace and less blood and guts may be what Passion needs.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A sometimes stirring, sometimes preposterous movie.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Koepp, an often ingenious writer, should have followed King's example and covered his tracks better. If he had, Secret Window might have been as good as "Stir of Echoes," and not simply a mini "Misery" and a not-quite "Shining."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Jersey Girl is an oddity, hard to dislike but impossible to buy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Man on Fire, which starts off as a good example of super-glitz moviemaking, gradually turns into a movie on fire -- another helter-skelter, big-studio spending spree. Too bad. It could use a lot more of Walken, Fanning and some more honest drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's an engrossing peek at an era that now seems as meteoric, crazy and distant as the Roaring Twenties.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This often entertaining movie mixes grand, epic effects and amazing visualizations of catastrophe with a sappy family-in-crisis plot that would look hackneyed in a '60s Disney TV movie.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Trying to be more antic and cuttingly funny, it misses the premise's shivery tension. The story loses us at precisely the moment it should put us in the vise.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Overall, King Arthur sinks into a grim, gray torpor - though it's an odd, not unentertaining movie. The approach is different, if not edifying or convincing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie may lack a lot of things, but it doesn't lack comic timing--or, in its own way, a nose for the news.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A big, creepy dollhouse of a movie--a sometimes engrossing shocker with a surprise ending that isn't especially shocking or surprising.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Sweet-tempered, good-looking, goofy and not too sharp. The movie doesn't make much sense and neither does Danny, played by Welsh heartthrob Rhys Ifans.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The script isn't really good enough to worry about whether it's being over-directed; in fact, E. Elias Merhige's over-direction is one of the best things about this movie--along with Ben Kingsley's grimly unstoppable killer-of-killers, Benjamin O'Ryan.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Campbell and her character are willing to take chances. But Toback's tangled noirish plot, with Vera as a post-feminist femme fatale, isn't particularly clever or original.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie tries hard to duplicate the original's mood and story, but, like Gere or Lopez, is too much of a visual knockout to rope us in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Likable as it is, suffers from that modern big-movie vice: overkill.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Good in many ways, full of talent and intelligence, and marks the debut of a promising young American writer-director, Dan Harris.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Melodrama triumphs. But here's at least some muted applause for a fine cast and filmmakers trying to confront the real world and its shadows.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a tribute to Penn's talent and guts that he manages to bring it off--even if the movie doesn't.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    As a whole, though, the movie is much less magnetic or believable than its star.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    One of the most discouraging things about many big studio movies is the way they waste resources, mainly talent and money. Pushing Tin manages to waste an excellent cast, a glossy production and what initially seems to be a bright, funny script. [23 April 1999, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A wildly improbable story that neither Newman nor co-stars Fiorentino and Mulroney, for all their panache and chemistry, can make much sense of it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Far too self-absorbed a picture.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A well-researched and well-illustrated, if often facetious, record of the U.S. government's longtime war on cannabis. And while it's a little too single-minded, it's both fun to watch and quite informative.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 29 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Tries to blend old film noir and new high-tech thriller styles with only sporadic impact.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a movie of elegant surfaces, great background music (by both the Mahlers), gossipy underpinnings and pretensions to romantic grandeur.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    As Almereyda unrolled his modern Gotham version, the story became gripping, the characters fascinating, the events mesmerizing, the resolution shocking and piteous.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie isn't quite spry, warm or hip enough to carry out its very ambitious serio-comic agenda. Even for an ace like Levinson, Belfast is a long way from Baltimore.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This is a movie that really has little to offer but performances and ideas. For a while, that's enough.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Never really feels right.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Even if you enjoyed the mean, funny 1995 John Travolta-Elmore Leonard crime comedy "Get Shorty"-and many of us did-this forced sequel isn't likely to help you repeat the experience.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Good action movies live on style and excitement. But they also need credibility, and in Hostage, ALMOST a good genre piece, plausibility keeps getting slaughtered.
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    But the film disappoints, partly because it inspires such large expectations.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    As bizarre, provocative and almost deliberately off-putting an indie picture as anything that's popped up in theaters recently.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    I don't think it will seriously disappoint longtime fans, but it made me itchy as I watched it unfold in ways that the comics never did when I read them in the '60s.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    If you're looking for purple romance with a social conscience, it doesn't get much more purple than God's Sandbox.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Sometimes one performance makes a film worthwhile, and Junebug has one: an astonishing, moving portrayal of down-home innocence and optimism by Amy Adams.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Is this the modern version of "Going My Way," with those squabbling, heart-warming Irish Catholic priests mixing up pop songs and hymns? Well, in a way it almost is, though its mood is far different and it's set in a far different world that moves to a different tempo and has graver and more troubling social crises.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    In the third story, set in Asheville, N.C., that excellent actress Hunt guides us steadily through what could be a minefield of sentimentality.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Despite the actors, the visuals and Forster's directorial swagger, the movie lacks impact.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A bloody strange movie--and a surprise. Who would have thought that you could put together an anthology of "extreme" Asian horror featurettes by three cutting-edge Asian directors where the most tasteful, restrained contribution was the one by Japanese mad dog moviemaker Takashi Miike?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Like the cerebral palsy-stricken Irish artist Christy Brown of "My Left Foot," Daniel Day-Lewis' Oscar-winning role, Ami is forced to fight such overwhelming odds to express himself that his very limitations become an aid to his vision.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a bit too muddy, dismal-looking and smoky to beguile us, too fixated on filth and too dreary-looking to really shock us.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Thanks to the actors and the way the movie lets them loose, it's often funny or moving at all the right moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    You either go for a movie like this or you don't. But though I didn't like it much, I've got to admit that The Descent is a nerve-jangler.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Hoodwinked treats "Red Riding Hood" as a detective story we've never really understood until now, with nuttier motivations, more complex characters and a screwier climax.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    This Pink Panther really doesn't have to achieve the heights of the original; it just has to be funny on its own terms. But it pales there too. Kline, a master of comic hypocrisy, deserves more screen time, Emily Mortimer is wasted as Clouseau's adoring assistant Nicole and Knowles is over indulged as Xania.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Proves, unhappily enough, how U.S.-style media politics is spreading around the world.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    In many respects, Forgiving Dr. Mengele is an ordinary documentary, stylistically and technically unexceptional. But its subject enobles the work. So does Kor : determined, indomitable, and by the end of the movie, a symbol herself of both survival and mercy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Democracy might not really come from a bottle of shampoo, but "Beauty Academy" teaches us that, sometimes, mascara really matters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    As a director, Buscemi is drier than he is as a performer: more quietly funny, less intense and sometimes weirdly compassionate.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a depressing story made even more of a downer by the absence of any Stones-performed music from their prime '60s years.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A confessional film that's almost too confessional--is like getting buttonholed by a casual acquaintance at a party and then subjected to a flood of highly intimate revelations that just don't stop.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    RV
    Robin Williams is such a great comic virtuoso that it can almost hurt to see him straining to pump life into a conventional, uninspired, sometimes-goofy big-studio comedy such as RV.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    An offbeat, poetic piece that eschews the terse, hard-boiled style of the standard cop movie or TV show for something softer-centered and more nakedly emotional.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Disappointingly, X-Men: The Last Stand slides back between the first two episodes. It's not stuporous, and it's not super.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Russian Dolls, like "L'Auberge," has an excellent cast (mostly the same one, in fact) and an impish style and speed that gives it more obvious audience appeal than the average French film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The King simply unsettles and bothers us -- and it finally misses both the true terror and the twisted redemption it needs for its wicked song, a would-be "Heartbreak Hotel" of horror, to really chill our spines.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Begins like a house afire and then fizzles out into a quasi-supernatural dead end.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A ridiculous but exciting action movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    An independent American art film that seems to be masquerading as Victorian-era pornography--and it's not quite as interesting or provocative as that description might make it sound.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a slick, ambitious movie that doesn't always nail all the many moods and themes it's after.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A movie of such cheerful craziness and nonstop ferocity that you can't take it seriously for a second.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The subject of Iraq haunts and divides us so much these days that a film like Laura Poitras' documentary My Country My Country is valuable, no matter its level of achievement.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    A stylish, nasty, very well-done Belgian horror movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The film's mood and style are pitched somewhere between '60s American indie and French New Wave and, as you watch these people, they seem painfully, amusingly on-target. They may irritate you a little, but that's the right response.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Probably the last movie to carry a credit for the late Christopher Reeve--as well as the last credit for Reeve's late wife, Dana.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Harsh Times, is almost a good, salty urban thriller.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Love can be a battleground, and, despite its homey-sounding title and gentle, almost nonchalant air, Jeff Lipsky's Flannel Pajamas gives us a series of messages from the front.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's possible to admire or respect a movie without enjoying it too much, and that's partly the reaction I had to Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain. It's an incredibly ambitious film of sometimes thrilling visual achievement, but it didn't connect fully to my mind and nerves.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    It's a fairly well-written piece and an even better acted one. And these days, when independent films are increasingly the salvation of the serious American dramatic movie, it's heartening to see something like The Architect, which tries to reawaken a major American dramatic tradition and sometimes succeeds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Highway Courtesans carries a feeling of truth, of bravely facing problems that are pressing and real. It's a good, informative piece on the oldest profession--and on how the world differs from what we usually see in the movies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Considering how good "Puccini's" middle often is, it's a shame it falls down fore and aft. But Maggenti, who loves Carole Lombard and William Powell in "My Man Godfrey," is tapping a likable vein here. She should open it up again.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie, like Smith, is breezy, fun and keeps comin' at ya. [22 Dec 2006, p.5]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The content may be dubious, but the execution is hypnotic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Mary Reilly is a thinking person's horror movie, done with such obvious intelligence and artistry that it feels strange to watch it and be so unmoved. [23 Feb 1996]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    M. Butterfly, David Cronenberg's visually stunning but oddly cold and sparkless adaptation of the much-prized David Henry Hwang play. [08 Oct 1993]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The late U.S. Rep. Sonny Bono and his widow and successor Mary Bono have spent a good deal of time trying to save it. It's a hard task, but the film does suggest there's more to the sea than meets the eye.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The movie contains its moments, charms and felicities-even its sharp stings of pleasure and pain. [20 May 1994]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Strikes me as something of an elaborate mistake, a wasted opportunity and a script Hartley should have discarded. But I liked it anyway.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    So stunningly shot and visualized--and scored so hauntingly well by Anja Garbarek, the daughter of saxophonist/composer Jan Garbarek--that it works even if you don't pay attention to the story. Maybe it works better that way.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Pugach's selfishness, his inability to detach love from gratification, is the key to this crazy story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Director Suri Krishnamma, depends on Finney for its power. His great performance carries the film over its shallow spots, its wish fulfillment, its pull toward caricature. [03 Feb 1995]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    There's something in Shallow Grave that is admirable, beyond its obvious display of youthful talent. [24 Feb 1995]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    While the movie is never dull, its romantic fodder doesn't do justice to any period at all.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Kika is kind of a mess. But it's a charming, stimulating, talented and ingratiating mess, none-the-less.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    The Theory of Flight is built from the kind of material that either soars or crashes with audiences. And here, it doesn't quite hold together. But if the film, as a whole, never takes flight, the actors do. Watching them bicker and sail up is so delightful, you only wish their vehicle could keep them aloft longer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael Wilmington
    Bond, like rock 'n' roll -- or Tomorrow -- may never die. Even so, watching the movie explode and crash its way toward its climax, I could only keep thinking: Come back, Richard Maibaum.

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