Michelle Orange

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For 221 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michelle Orange's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 90 Two Days, One Night
Lowest review score: 20 Battle: Los Angeles
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 11 out of 221
221 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    Farmiga closes in on moments that express mood and character so lightly and perceptively that you don't notice them gently - sometimes too gently - moving the story forward.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    The Town lacks Gone's operatic ambitions. And the irony is that that lack of a grand or even grandiose plan keeps this very good film from being a truly great one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 55 Michelle Orange
    Rather than beginning with the assumption that there is no possibility of our coming to know that kind of suffering exactly and using imagination and insight to truly take us inside the Lvov Jews' plight, Holland makes the base conditions of their confinement a narrative as well as aesthetic priority. And frankly it's boring as shit.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    Hill cuts a hilariously adversarial figure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    The audience is never seen and only faintly heard. This puts a lot of visual pressure on a very inward performer. Young is a beast onstage, to be sure - he seems to re-grow an appendix for each song.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    Ultimately -- and perhaps fittingly -- Cropsey is most effective as a study of Staten Island and its inhabitants, specifically the half-life of grief as it is manifested in a self-contained community.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Michelle Orange
    The film's delighted affinity with Ungerer's well-turned perspective does lend an advertorial slickness to what might have been a more challenging study of a fascinating and famously elusive subject.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    A brightly lit nightmare of patriarchy run amok.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Michelle Orange
    It's all rather casual - not unengaging, exactly, but lacking a narrative energy all its own.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 65 Michelle Orange
    The main and most enjoyable difference between the second installment and the first is the greater opportunity the latter provides Cassel to sketch some dimension into the coded mythologizing of his character.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    It's a mark of Shelton's ability to create living characters from seemingly minor shared moments -- the ones that wind up meaning everything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Michelle Orange
    The complementary tone of droll but freighted psychodrama she strikes in Tiny Furniture feels like a significant but precarious achievement. I feel a pinch of worry for her - as I did for Aura - looking into a future of Rudins and Apatows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Michelle Orange
    To say too much about what actually happens would be to rob you of the film's risks and narrative ripostes. What should be noted is that Capotondi makes ambitious use of an unreliable narrator in a way that is rarely seen in modern films.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Michelle Orange
    An awkward, frequently transcendent document whose sense of rhythm, purpose, and narrative is as unlikely as it is ultimately persuasive, and whose fascination with moments of haunted impermanence signals, perhaps more than anything else, the mark of its maker.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Michelle Orange
    The story had great optics but not a lot of action, I suppose, though as a child who walked around in towel-fashioned headdresses to simulate the long hair my mother wouldn't let me have, Rapunzel's was the story I longed to thrill to on the big screen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Michelle Orange
    An earnest and occasionally poignant attempt to penetrate Rebney's potent man-on-fire image and explore the impact of becoming an Internet sideshow.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 55 Michelle Orange
    Mostly it's frustrating; the film is an episodic jumble that runs hot and cold not in some implied thematic synchronicity with its subject's character but as part of a misguided approach that assumes the audience will find whatever Mesrine does, in whatever order and with whatever emphasis, inherently fascinating.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michelle Orange
    Though the film concerns events contained within the roughly 50 square blocks of the East Village, it suffers from the narrative equivalent of urban sprawl.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Michelle Orange
    Peepli Live opens out slowly to encompass several factions of Indian society, including the press, local, state, and federal politicians, and the shady elements binding them all together. It's a meticulously engineered design that a show like The Wire took several years to execute; here the strain shows within the first half hour.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    Dark to a specific point of dullness or even opacity, Solondz requires patience, as always, but indulgence as well. He relies on your remembrance of his other films and characters but also on your willingness to overlook his redeployment of tactics that range from puerile to mildly -- and somehow always self-skeptically -- profound.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    The climax errs on the side of the overwrought and overdetermined, like an earnest adolescent's first attempt at a short story. And yet Papoulia's extraordinary performance lingers, as does the film's provocative existential fog.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    By the time he's putting the entire metro area on notice -- having thrashed his father and all the local bullies -- Andrew has no camera and the metaphor has run away with the story entirely. The crazy thing is it almost works.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 85 Michelle Orange
    Arthur Christmas is a Grinch-style story of rekindled Christmas spirit told from inside Santa's compound at the North Pole.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 65 Michelle Orange
    As a character study Solitary Man, like Ben, has no center. What he amounts to is a pretty consistent set of attitudes and behaviors which, while shocking, are not all that interesting.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    Physically Watts is of course a decent match for the even more aggressively glamorous Plame; in spirit, it would seem, they are even closer. In the field Plame was first and foremost an actress, a pretender whose belief in her pretending was often of mortal consequence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    A sweeping theme writ small and somewhat gnarly, The Milk of Sorrow is, as Llosa has written, about "unresolved, violent, personal and collective memory" and a "metaphor for breakdown."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    Fittingly, there is something both thrilling and deeply unpleasant about looking at Galella's body of work -- there is casual genius in some of the captured moments, a combination of access, timing, and luck, with the subject almost always carrying most of the image's weight.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    As Gibney and Spitzer are at pains to point out, it's a story as old as Icarus: Man rises to power; man makes enemies; man gets greedy and is undone.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michelle Orange
    Scenic, inventively playful, and successfully serious when it wants to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Michelle Orange
    It looks more like your teenage world than such films generally allow, and it's not pretty. It's beautiful.

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