For 2,199 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mick LaSalle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Kandahar
Lowest review score: 0 Speed 2: Cruise Control
Score distribution:
2,199 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Has a gutsy premise, but no guts.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Ill conceived and unworthy (and dull and ridiculous).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Moon is boring. Agonizingly, deadeningly, coma-inducingly, they-could-bury-you-alive-accidentally boring.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The most enjoyable way to watch Surveillance - "enjoyable," in the relative sense - is to take its awfulness for granted and pay attention to everything Bill Pullman does.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The bad outweighs the good and the cringes outnumber the laughs in BrĂ¼no, a disappointment from Sacha Baron Cohen, whose "Borat" was one of the funniest movies of the decade.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Scorsese stuffs the film with heavy-handed art direction and piles on a ludicrously ominous soundtrack. The soundtrack is a constant reminder of the movie's importance and only highlights its unimportance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    A cute movie, a little too cute and a little too aware of its own cuteness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    An empty exercise.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    It's a gorefest, a borefest and a snorefest.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Setting out to make a cult movie is almost as strange as setting out to make a camp movie. Or setting out to make a movie that's so bad it's good. If you know you're doing it, you're not really doing it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The production values are first rate. But you will wait in vain to hear a good reason for this movie's existence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Owen is a magnetic, sensitive presence at the center of a movie that doesn't deserve him and that barely deserves to be seen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The film ends up landing in a confused middle category. It's neither a coherent, discrete work nor a zany tribute to the late actor.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Serious Moonlight is a tonal disaster, distasteful and sentimental by turns. It was probably a mistake to have Hines try to walk that same delicate line that took Shelly her entire career to master.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    John Lennon once said, "There's a great woman behind every idiot." This time, I'm counting seven of them.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Saint John of Las Vegas was a bad script that somehow got made into a bad movie with good people in it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Holes in the script, overwrought camera work, dialogue that's embarrassing, and a plot device that's obvious 10 minutes into the movie - all these are major problems.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Represents his (Smith) first act of cinematic cynicism, his first crime against his own talent. With this action comedy, he has given us 110 worthless minutes, a bad formula movie like every other bad formula movie.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Take the worst things about independent movies - the wallowing in an unpleasantness, the narrative unsteadiness, the next-to-no story. Then combine those with a hefty dose of light comedy. The result: the big, fat tonal mess that is Happy Tears, a charmless film about two sisters who come together to care for their demented father.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The bottom line here is that Cyrus is ghastly in The Last Song, bad not just in one or two ways, but in all kinds of ways.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The Losers is boring. It's predictable. It's so, so active, and yet so, so dead.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    What we have in this film is a whole lot of nothing, and the little that's there is irritating.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    It's a strange thing, this type of whimsy. Kari offers us ideas in place of characters, and yet he expects us to see through these ideas to the real-life conditions they represent - and then to respond to them in kind.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Twenty minutes in, the movie is already operating at a deficit, and it never recovers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Highly visual but cold. It's undeniably inventive, but also relentlessly fey and self-consciously zany and, in terms of story, it moves with audacious slowness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    The worst kind of avant-garde film, one that hides its lack of commitment to the story, the characters and the genre under cover of being experimental. It mocks form and plays with form but offers nothing in its place, just boredom, emptiness and the oldest metaphor in captivity, about grass coming up through concrete.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Standing Ovation is an innovative film in the sense that every minute or so it comes up with a different way of being annoying. Moreover, it often goes for a layered effect, in which it's annoying in two or three ways simultaneously.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    It turns out to be just as bad as any routine French romantic comedy - illogical, inconsistent and sloppily written, a charmless, tasteless, witless waste of time.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    As vile, unredeeming and thoroughly unpleasant experiences go, I Spit on Your Grave at least has one thing interesting about it. It's a document of the most paranoid fantasies that urban, Northern people have about a rural Southern people.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    There are all kinds of bad movies in the world, but it's really only stardom that can create the exact variety of cinematic abortion we find in The Tourist.