For 211 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 91 Computer Chess
Lowest review score: 10 Off Label
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 65 out of 211
  2. Negative: 24 out of 211
211 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s more, it’s fun, generating pleasure not from canned jokes or clichéd plot twists but simply from a sense of unhindered freedom.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Arguably, the performance is too single-minded to achieve real greatness, but its utter lack of showmanship is precisely what the movie requires; at its best, All Is Lost could almost be a documentary about survival at sea, though it’s more starkly elemental than even nature documentaries usually get.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    The result demonstrates that Farhadi, who is cinema’s heir to the likes of Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov, is so deft at ingenious narrative construction and intricate character development that he can make first-rate dramas in any country and/or language he likes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Boasts one of the most expertly crafted screenplays of the ’90s.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Mike D'Angelo
    Shot over five nights in a single location, and almost entirely improvised, Coherence is no-budget filmmaking at its most delectably inventive.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    It plays like the kind of movie you’d stumble onto watching TCM late at night and get sucked into against your will, amazed that something you’d never heard of, with no purchase in film history, could be this absorbing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    This tale of a creepy pedophilic relationship is the most tender, nuanced, and deeply felt picture Seidl has ever made. What’s more, there’s no need to have seen the other two films, as Hope works beautifully all by its lonesome.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    That The Selfish Giant feels familiar rather than groundbreaking makes it seem to some degree a step back for its talented director, but she’s avoided the sophomore jinx with aplomb.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Keenly observed, geographically specific portraits of adolescence are always welcome, but there’s definitely something to be said for charging the genre’s usual tender lyricism with an ever-present threat of life-altering violence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Movies about middle-aged women are so rare that it’s tempting to praise them on that basis alone. Thankfully, the Chilean drama Gloria, which won Paulina García the Best Actress prize at last year’s Berlin International Film Festival, doesn’t require much critical mitigation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Once upon a time, a movie like this would have seemed a minor pleasure, enjoyable, but unremarkable. Today, it looks more like a treasure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Superficially similar to Hany Abu-Assad’s Oscar-nominated Omar, it’s a considerably more complex and nuanced examination of the conflicted loyalties and dangerous relationships that characterize daily life in the Middle East, featuring remarkably strong, charismatic performances by a host of mostly non-professional actors.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s remarkably assured and subtle work, worthy of comparison to Catherine Deneuve’s brilliantly blank turn in Buñuel’s film.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s surface is as spiky as its protagonists’ hair and wardrobe, but the overall effect can only be described as downright endearing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Director Megan Griffiths, best known for the grim human-trafficking drama "Eden," proves surprisingly adept at this lighter material, maintaining a slightly loopy tone that serves to make the occasional dramatic moments all the more piercing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Mike D'Angelo
    Director and co-writer Zack Parker (Scalene) combines a Hitchcockian penchant for disorientation with a Brian De Palma-esque formal bravado, and he’s made the rare film that’s impossible to peg all the way up to its final minutes—a truly unnerving study in multiple pathologies.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Writer-director Eran Creevy demonstrates little facility for kineticism — one of the movie’s best scenes gets flat-out ruined when he abruptly shifts to hackneyed slo-mo — and his cynical plot gets so convoluted that one of the bad guys has to break it down for the audience in a climactic monologue-at-gunpoint.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Beneath the surface outrageousness lies a surprisingly, satisfyingly dark little fable about the essentially cannibalistic nature of artistic inspiration.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The cast is immensely appealing, the heist is ingenious, and the collision of hardscrabble working-class kids and Sideways-style alcohol snobs generates steady laughs, though somewhat predictable ones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Mud
    Mud unfortunately begins to develop a sour aftertaste in the handful of minor subplots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a film that wants to celebrate as much as doom-say.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The film springs to life in its second half, when the members’ grown kids, who are also working musicians, discover that their dads/uncles were in a forgotten, innovative band that the family had never once mentioned.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    That Mazer succeeds in playing this for laughs — however sporadic — rather than as a kitchen-sink downer is an achievement in itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a sense in which The Square feels incomplete, like the first part of a much longer effort. It’s hard to blame Noujaim for presenting it to the public now, but the decision to do so is primarily political, not artistic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    A lovely but rambling excursion through moneyed Rome, the film can’t have remotely the same impact as its predecessor, but it does offer a cornucopia of dazzling images—so many, frankly, that it becomes a bit exhausting, especially at nearly two and a half hours.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    At just 75 minutes, the movie doesn’t wear out its welcome, though its shapelessness can be frustrating; it ends abruptly, on a moment that could be interpreted as a triumph or as a profound loss, and it doesn’t seem to care much what one concludes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Dom Hemingway is often ghoulishly funny, with Law, who put on weight for the role and plays up his receding hairline, turning in a larger-than-life performance unlike any he’s given before.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    On the whole, though, Burning Bush is an absorbing docudrama that maintains a gratifying equilibrium between hope and cynicism. You can fight City Hall. It just takes a while.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    While Swartz almost certainly would not have been sentenced to 50 years in prison, a system that tries to scare harmless do-gooders into submission does America no credit. In this case, it succeeded all too horribly well.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Broken may someday be remembered only as a minor footnote in Norris’ career, but it’s already a career worth following.