Mike D'Angelo

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For 397 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Duke of Burgundy
Lowest review score: 10 Off Label
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 37 out of 397
397 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Mike D'Angelo
    At its core, this is one of the most incisive, penetrating, and empathetic films ever made about what it truly means to love another person, audaciously disguised as salacious midnight-movie fare. No better picture is likely to surface all year.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s more, it’s fun, generating pleasure not from canned jokes or clichéd plot twists but simply from a sense of unhindered freedom.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Arguably, the performance is too single-minded to achieve real greatness, but its utter lack of showmanship is precisely what the movie requires; at its best, All Is Lost could almost be a documentary about survival at sea, though it’s more starkly elemental than even nature documentaries usually get.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    The result demonstrates that Farhadi, who is cinema’s heir to the likes of Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov, is so deft at ingenious narrative construction and intricate character development that he can make first-rate dramas in any country and/or language he likes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Boasts one of the most expertly crafted screenplays of the ’90s.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s not a documentary that reinvents the form or will alter anyone’s perception of the war, but sometimes a rich, exhaustive chronicle is more than enough.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s also just magnificently goofy, unafraid to court ridicule and confident enough to take captivating detours.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Mike D'Angelo
    Shot over five nights in a single location, and almost entirely improvised, Coherence is no-budget filmmaking at its most delectably inventive.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a film that captures humanity at its best and its worst, sometimes simultaneously.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    It plays like the kind of movie you’d stumble onto watching TCM late at night and get sucked into against your will, amazed that something you’d never heard of, with no purchase in film history, could be this absorbing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    This tale of a creepy pedophilic relationship is the most tender, nuanced, and deeply felt picture Seidl has ever made. What’s more, there’s no need to have seen the other two films, as Hope works beautifully all by its lonesome.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    That The Selfish Giant feels familiar rather than groundbreaking makes it seem to some degree a step back for its talented director, but she’s avoided the sophomore jinx with aplomb.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Keenly observed, geographically specific portraits of adolescence are always welcome, but there’s definitely something to be said for charging the genre’s usual tender lyricism with an ever-present threat of life-altering violence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Movies about middle-aged women are so rare that it’s tempting to praise them on that basis alone. Thankfully, the Chilean drama Gloria, which won Paulina García the Best Actress prize at last year’s Berlin International Film Festival, doesn’t require much critical mitigation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Once upon a time, a movie like this would have seemed a minor pleasure, enjoyable, but unremarkable. Today, it looks more like a treasure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Superficially similar to Hany Abu-Assad’s Oscar-nominated Omar, it’s a considerably more complex and nuanced examination of the conflicted loyalties and dangerous relationships that characterize daily life in the Middle East, featuring remarkably strong, charismatic performances by a host of mostly non-professional actors.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s remarkably assured and subtle work, worthy of comparison to Catherine Deneuve’s brilliantly blank turn in Buñuel’s film.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s surface is as spiky as its protagonists’ hair and wardrobe, but the overall effect can only be described as downright endearing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Director Megan Griffiths, best known for the grim human-trafficking drama "Eden," proves surprisingly adept at this lighter material, maintaining a slightly loopy tone that serves to make the occasional dramatic moments all the more piercing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Unlike Wiseman’s greatest films, National Gallery never quite finds an overarching theme. There’s a fair amount of material regarding the art/commerce divide, but many scenes have no bearing whatsoever on that subject, and the film generally lacks urgency.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    In his three previous films (The Return, The Banishment, Elena), Zvyagintsev frequently pushed past sober into dour, leaning too heavily on a characteristically Soviet sense of gloom and doom... Leviathan is another downer, but it’s considerably looser and livelier than its predecessors, verging at times on black comedy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    There are a couple of exciting set pieces, including a superb chase sequence in which Abel pursues one of the hijackers along some train tracks, but A Most Violent Year is primarily interested in detailing the ways in which moral gray areas inevitably shade into true darkness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    '71
    The setting may be Belfast ’71, but Demange’s sensibility — first-rate suspense coupled with black-and-white politics — is much more James Cameron ’86.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Because there’s no real narrative — just the constant effort to score and survive, plus Harley’s dysfunctional on/off love affair with Ilya — Heaven Knows What doesn’t so much conclude as just stop, which is less than totally satisfying.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    For the most part, Tamhane improbably succeeds in creating a damning courtroom drama that derives much of its power from observing the cogs in the machinery when the machine is switched off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Desplechin’s pictures can be as maddening as they are exhilarating, and the same is true of The Mend, which sometimes seems in danger of over dosing on its own stylistic flourishes. Nonetheless, it’s a hugely promising introduction to a director who’s just getting started.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Mike D'Angelo
    Director and co-writer Zack Parker (Scalene) combines a Hitchcockian penchant for disorientation with a Brian De Palma-esque formal bravado, and he’s made the rare film that’s impossible to peg all the way up to its final minutes—a truly unnerving study in multiple pathologies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s hard to build a story entirely on grace notes, but Lafleur comes close.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Writer-director Eran Creevy demonstrates little facility for kineticism — one of the movie’s best scenes gets flat-out ruined when he abruptly shifts to hackneyed slo-mo — and his cynical plot gets so convoluted that one of the bad guys has to break it down for the audience in a climactic monologue-at-gunpoint.

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