Mike D'Angelo
Select another critic »
For 283 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 91 All Is Lost
Lowest review score: 10 Off Label
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 86 out of 283
  2. Negative: 30 out of 283
283 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    On the whole, though, Burning Bush is an absorbing docudrama that maintains a gratifying equilibrium between hope and cynicism. You can fight City Hall. It just takes a while.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    While Swartz almost certainly would not have been sentenced to 50 years in prison, a system that tries to scare harmless do-gooders into submission does America no credit. In this case, it succeeded all too horribly well.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    What keeps Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! from being irredeemably offensive are Almodóvar’s efforts, however vague and tentative, to undermine his own thesis.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Writer-director Catherine Breillat who adapted the film from her own roman à clef, seems content to let the story stand on its own two feet, as if it were something that she’d invented from whole cloth rather than experienced. It’s a laudable approach, in theory, but it backfires a bit in this particular instance, because what occurs is so psychologically inexplicable that Breillat’s alter ego comes across as terminally foolish.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Aggressively derivative though The Longest Week is, however, it’s clearly the work not of a lazy thief, but of a raw talent who’s still struggling to find his own voice. In the meantime, his impressions are pretty darn impressive.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Nightcrawler is a portrait of an amoral opportunist who stumbles upon his horrible calling, and the film’s chief pleasure is watching Gyllenhaal portray what it might be like if Rushmore’s Max Fischer grew up to become Chuck Tatum, the unscrupulous reporter played by Kirk Douglas in Billy Wilder’s scabrous Ace In The Hole. It’s adolescent solipsism gone grotesquely rancid.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    People tend to equate great acting with demonstrative emoting, but knowing when not to telegraph what a character is feeling is just as crucial. Sometimes, walking from point A to point Z — simply, without fuss — is all that’s required.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Broken may someday be remembered only as a minor footnote in Norris’ career, but it’s already a career worth following.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    The story’s overall trajectory is familiar, and sometimes clichéd, but it still has the power to surprise and startle from moment to moment, which is what really counts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Every scene featuring Amy and Rat together is a giddy marvel of kinetic energy, with Roberts and Cusack seemingly in competition to determine which of them can make their character more unsympathetic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Because the actors are uniformly strong, though, and because the neighborhood itself provides such a credible context, Slattery manages to create the impression of an immense backstory that informs every interaction, making any sketchiness seem like naturalism rather than a failure of imagination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Following the self-importance of recent (and inexplicably prizewinning) films like Arirang and Pieta, however, Moebius feels like a giddy, playful return to form. It’s as uproarious as genital mutilation gets.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Janiak handles both horror and drama ably enough to suggest that she’d excel at either genre. She hasn’t yet mastered the combination, but it’s only her first try. Give her time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Zero Motivation never stops being sharply funny, and there’s scarcely a hint of didacticism in its depiction of female soldiers who are essentially treated as a secretarial pool, so bored that they have to invent tasks to perform and create melodrama from scratch.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a magnificently acrid showcase for two idiosyncratic actors who seem uncannily in tune with each other, even as their characters are out of sync.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    First-time writer-director Jenny Deller has assembled a superb cast, with Madigan in particular making the most of her character’s no-nonsense flintiness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    From moment to moment, The Silence can feel a bit pokey, as it divides its attention among a host of characters and never builds up much urgency about the fate of the second victim, whose body hasn’t been found.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Director Sally El Hosaini, who also wrote the screenplay, proves better at introducing dilemmas for her characters than at resolving them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    For better and for worse—often simultaneously—few movies have been as unflinching about the ugly, heartbreaking ways human beings can mutually exploit one another for fun and/or profit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The film is never less than fascinating, but it appears to be so intensely personal as to be all but indecipherable to viewers not personally acquainted with the filmmaker, or at least in possession of the press kit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    What comes across most strongly is the genuine, overpowering love these two women have for each other, even when they’re in direct competition.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    How to Make Money Selling Drugs is breezy fun, even when it eventually turns openly cynical.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The title’s parenthetical plural sums up the problem with Some Girl(s): Five slow-cook dialogues that reveal the nice-guy protagonist as a super-tool is four too many.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    None of the complexity of that initial interaction between teacher and lovestruck little girl carries over into the town’s reaction, which closely resembles that of the villagers in "Frankenstein." It’s like watching a deer run from shotguns for two hours — it evokes some sympathy, but that’s about all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a pleasant, negligible wisp of a movie, notable mostly for what it suggests of its director’s potential.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Blackfish’s strongest argument against the existence of parks like SeaWorld is how much more gorgeous orcas look in the open ocean than leaping about an oversized swimming pool. And the audience won’t get soaking wet watching them frolic in movies, either.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    A wholly fictional tale, and while it has a few lovely, tender moments, there’s a definite feeling of “been there, drawn that.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The movie actually does feature a world — the insular voiceover world — and whenever it strays, it falters.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    At its best, the film conveys a wealth of compelling details that only an insider, or at least someone who’s done extensive and thorough research, would think worthy of singling out.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Functions exactly like a sketch movie, using its meager, essentially irrelevant plot as a clothesline upon which to string a series of self-contained bits. At least half of the bits are pretty damn funny, though, and that’s arguably all that matters.

Top Trailers