Mike D'Angelo

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For 589 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Duke of Burgundy
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 589
589 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    A duly serious and ambitious fall movie that, despite the best efforts of its formidable director and cast, can’t remotely match the excitement of real life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    As pop sociology, London Road doesn’t delve terribly deep, repeating the same simple observations (principally: people are self-interested) over and over. As a nearly avant-garde musical, however, it’s a constant grin-conjuring marvel.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    As an autobiography told in pictures rather than words (including occasional glimpses of Johnson’s parents and her children), Cameraperson makes a strong case for the merits of the observational life. As a bonus, it also demonstrates what it looks like when the person who’s holding the camera sneezes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Clea DuVall makes her debut here as writer-director, and after two decades in front of the camera, she knows actors — but the movie’s stifling familiarity prevents it from making much of an impact.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s as if a first-rate Roman Polanski movie suddenly metamorphosed (ohhh, frogs, duh) into a third-rate Michael Crichton adaptation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Portman’s emotional connection to the material couldn’t be more obvious, yet the film itself is still largely inert.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    This is a decidedly small-scale tragedy, but it still packs a cumulative wallop.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Dramatically, it’s not much of a movie, but if you just want to know how things went down, it’s certainly a more exciting précis than Wikipedia’s.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    At bottom, this is the story of freaks and geeks everywhere: a quest for the like-minded, rooted in obsessive engagement with a tiny sliver of pop culture.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    This virtually action-free war movie (which premiered at Cannes last year with the English-language title The Wakhan Front) will frustrate anyone seeking concrete explanations. Its haunting atmosphere, however, in conjunction with its half-harrowing, half-sleepy milieu, keeps the film fascinating until it finally fizzles.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Indeed, there are stretches of Into The Forest during which one could momentarily forget that it’s a survivalist tale at all… or even that it’s taking place in the middle of nowhere, for that matter. The essential becomes irrelevant.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    While that may sound like a downer, the film itself is anything but, offering a genuinely uplifting testament to one woman’s resilience.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Everything onscreen still feels credible, but forbidden-love stories are as predictable as the changing of the seasons. Summertime had briefly seemed to promise something more mercurial.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Mike D'Angelo
    Three cheers, then, for Bingham Bryant and Kyle Molzan, whose joint first effort, For The Plasma, ranks among the year’s most singular movies, even as it also ranks among the year’s most painful movies to endure.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    The main problem with Outlaws And Angels, though, is that it lacks either a sense of authenticity or a streak of playfulness to give shape to its relentlessly ugly worldview.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    At best, the film is a Rorschach testimonial, lionizing its subject while offering enough objectivity to allow non-believers to opt out. At worst, it’s a very long infomercial.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    As a result, the movie version feels a tad weightless, especially relative to its hefty running time. Anyone in the mood for two hours (and change) of sheer, unadulterated loveliness, however, will be amply rewarded.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The film does the job; it holds your attention. Overall, though, this is a classic “Say, why not read a book instead?” situation.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Like many historical dramas, unfortunately, this one depicts gripping events without bothering to craft a coherent viewpoint that lends them meaning.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Mike D'Angelo
    Right Now, Wrong Then — which won the top prize at 2015’s Locarno Film Festival, and is heroically being released by brand-new distributor Grasshopper Film — is not only his finest work to date but also the very best film released in 2016 so far.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Works best when it straddles the same line between mild hostility and equally mild affection.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    All the same, Tickled does shine a much-needed light on that individual’s long history of abusive behavior, which has resulted in only a light slap on the wrist, thanks to inherited wealth and the power it confers.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Orson Welles famously called filmmaking “the biggest electric-train set any boy ever had,” and Raiders! captures that spirit without inviting the mockery that, say, American Movie does.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Rich detail and strong performances do battle with coming-of-age clichés in King Jack, an indie drama that winds up feeling overly beholden to the dictates of various screenwriting manuals.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    From Afar plays like a typical first feature, with ambition outstripping execution by a hefty margin.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Without Wong Kar-Wai’s visual grandeur to provide a sense of the epic, The Final Master just lurches clumsily from one scene to the next, flatlining whenever fists aren’t flying.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    The Ones Below is a thriller that exasperates more than it thrills.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    In short, this is yet another doc that would make a first-rate book or lengthy article, gaining almost nothing from its chosen medium apart from (maybe) greater exposure. There’s no legitimate taxonomic reason for this material to be designated a film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a fascinating story here, but the movie never gets out of its own way long enough to tell it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It does offer a very amusing portrait of guile and idiocy. Think of it as a divertissement. Both Austen and Stillman would surely approve.

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