Mike D'Angelo

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For 544 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Right Now, Wrong Then
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 544
544 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    What keeps Horses lively is its sharp young cast—especially the two Rachids, who are also brothers in real life, and do an expert job of showing how Hamid and Yachine slowly change places.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    The film is less effective as an inspirational saga than as a simple portrait of a marriage in its twilight years, with the house-in-progress serving as a metaphor for love that endures by being constantly renewed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    At its best, Losing Ground suggests a wobbly filmmaker who was robbed of the chance to steady herself. At its worst, it’s still a fascinating time capsule.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    While what will happen next is never especially interesting, how it will happen, and from what unusual angle, generates enough excitement to keep things intermittently lively.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a difference between an exhibition of one photographer’s work and a speedy tour of a museum’s entire photography wing, and Watermark feels more like the latter, despite Burtynsky’s involvement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    American Promise, shot over a period of 13 years, is by no means a wasted effort. At the same time, though, it’s hard not to wonder whether directors Joe Brewster and Michèle Stephenson (who are married) wound up with a film that even remotely resembles whatever vague idea they had in mind back in 1999.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a compelling story. Trouble is, it isn’t a terribly visual story, and this documentary doesn’t serve it nearly as well as a book or lengthy article would.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    In the end, Mr. Nobody’s title is simply too apt.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    While the film runs only 77 minutes, that’s a good half an hour longer than the material can support, even though Workman shot it over roughly a decade.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    Too blunt and didactic to convey the futility of war with the complexity the subject demands, Tangerines works primarily as a showcase for its trio of lead actors, who work hard to make their characters’ gradual yet quick thaw seem not just credible, but inevitable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    For the most part, Pigeon is very much in the same mold as its two predecessors, which is part of the problem.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    The characters inhabiting this convoluted, tough-to-follow story feel too much like chess pieces, despite the refreshing multi-ethnic cast.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a sentimental streak to These Final Hours, but in the end (heh), it feels as if it’s been earned.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    This is a film that moves too erratically to ever gain momentum, seemingly by design.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    Kelly & Cal is worth seeing, if only because it gives Lewis her first truly meaty role in years.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s absolutely nothing new or innovative to be found here, but sometimes it can be almost comforting to watch a movie do an unironic tour of the classics.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s biggest drawback is its essentially passive nature, which prevents it from ever building to a crescendo.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    Smiling Faces is a strongly promising first effort, introducing a talented filmmaker who’s still in the process of finding his own voice. Still, don’t be too surprised if, three or four features down the road, it retroactively looks much more singular.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a wishy-washiness to the film’s ideological bent that keeps steering things in a more conventional direction, as if Jones (or perhaps Glendon Swarthout, who wrote the source novel) were afraid to take this risky material all the way. It’s a decidedly bumpy ride to an odd destination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Mike D'Angelo
    There isn’t much to it, really, but a little truth and loveliness is always welcome.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    In the end, a thoroughly needless rehash.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Apparently struggling to please two very different audiences at once, Horovitz seems to have little control over the material, ultimately wrapping things up with a neat little bow that makes a mockery of the preceding ugliness.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Most of the pleasure in Green Dragons comes simply from the opportunity to watch some underused actors dig into meatier parts than they’re usually offered.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    By the time Roman and Lucy seek shelter from a storm in an abandoned military bunker, Two Lovers And A Bear has turned into a horror film in which backstory is the monster.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Even if Mandy Lane had been released in a timely fashion, it’s unlikely that it would have found much of an audience. For all its good intentions, it’s ultimately too half-assed and lethargic to work as a conventional horror film, and not nearly thoughtful or incisive enough to subsist on thwarted expectations alone.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Sunlight Jr. is one no-hope bummer after another, and it’s just not psychologically or sociologically acute enough to make the experience worthwhile. Watching anyone over 30 working for minimum wage would achieve the same goal in about 15 minutes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Lazer Team is carried along by the sheer enthusiasm of its main quartet....It’s just too bad that there’s less wit in the dialogue than there is in the Barenaked Ladies’ closing-credits song.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    All the same, as dramatized here, The Attack skirts perilously close to being an apologia for suicide bombing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a film of nearly pure sensation: woozy, intoxicating, visually gorgeous… and maddeningly repetitive.

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