Mike D'Angelo

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For 608 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Duke of Burgundy
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 608
608 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Belvaux has made a gutsy, discomfiting movie about going along to get along, and just how dangerous that impulse can ultimately be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Ghost Stories works best as an exercise in nostalgia. Those seeking hardcore, modern-day scares will be disappointed.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    More retroactive documentary than docudrama, it’s remarkably effective at creating a sense of verisimilitude, and these non-actors seem far more comfortable in their own skin.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Unlike Oren Moverman’s superficially similar "Time Out Of Mind," in which Richard Gere plays a homeless man, Where Is Kyra? doesn’t constantly feel like what it necessarily is: the work of wealthy people simulating poverty. In part, that’s thanks to Pfeiffer’s vanity-free, internalized performance, which could hardly be more different from her deliciously abrasive turn in last year’s "Mother!" (It’s great to have her back.)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    While this is probably Shelton’s best fully scripted dramatic feature — a big improvement on the incoherent "Touchy Feely" (2013) — it’s the sort of earnest, conventional movie that many indie directors could make (and many do).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    As movies expressly courting the faith-based audience go, Paul, Apostle Of Christ acquits itself reasonably well from moment to moment, avoiding the howlers that plague such Pure Flix titles as "Samson" and "God’s Not Dead."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Cantet remains a gifted filmmaker — The Workshop’s semi-improvisational aspects are no less impressive than those in "The Class," and he’s at least superficially engaged with the current state of the world — but this isn’t the return to form that his fans have awaited over the past decade.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Is there any artistically compelling reason for the existence of the latest adaptation, which is clearly meant to take advantage of the centennial? Not really, but it’s a good play, once again providing juicy roles to fresh and established talent. That’ll suffice.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    Asano and the rest of the Japanese cast provide baseline credibility, but they can’t generate excitement from this morass of clichés.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Serves as a thoroughly engaging divertissement. That it comes across as more than a little half-assed is part of its unruly charm.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Werewolf unmistakably announces McKenzie as a potentially significant new voice, gifted enough to make well-trod ground seem newly landscaped.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Although thoughtful and probing, this portrait of good intentions gone awry has been so thoroughly intellectualized that there’s not much juice to it. It’s a movie that’s busy analyzing itself while you watch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Horror fans who’ve wondered what Bruckner might do with an entire movie of his own will be disappointed by his solo feature-length debut, The Ritual, which attempts to put a twist on the Blair Witch formula but demonstrates surprisingly little imagination.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s at once inspiring and heartbreaking to see a master with nothing left to prove still pushing the envelope in the final years of his life. He had plenty left to give us.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s hard to be persuasive, though, when your protagonist comes across as a collection of quirky tics rather than a credible human being.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a movie with no greater ambition than to charm and occasionally delight. Mission accomplished.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    If Garrel’s recent films (which also include In The Shadow Of Women and Frontier Of Dawn) play like variations on a theme, this one at least varies more than usual.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    In Between suffers when cross-cutting among its three similar yet disparate storylines, and is strongest during moments that see righteous anger get complicated by human nature.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s third act plays like a nihilistic Liam Neeson thriller, with Kruger struggling in vain to make Katja’s actions remotely believable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The same fundamental strengths and weaknesses — the former usually outweighing the latter, happily — are evident in all of his movies, no matter who’s in charge. A master like Fincher can add some visual zing, but the song remains the same.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    "Leviathan" (2014) pushed pitiless corruption into something like black comedy; Loveless is anything but funny, but does at least acknowledge fleeting moments of joy and understanding, even as it insists that they’re not nearly enough.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s something bracing about the difficulty of reconciling this earnest middle-aged hippie with his maniacally impish younger self.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s also somehow simultaneously one of his (Hong Sang-soo) most straightforward, emotionally direct movies and the weirdest damn thing he’s ever made.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    So many movies are all sizzle and no steak; it’s kind of refreshing, in a way, to be frustrated by all steak and no sizzle.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Betts appears to have started out with a rather mundane idea and then stumbled, over the course of her research, onto something much more fruitful. The result is as intriguing and frustrating as that suggests.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s tonal range is formidable enough to suggest that this director may be a major talent who’s now emerging from relative obscurity, thanks to the Berlin prize and subsequent attention at festivals in Toronto and New York. It’s always exciting to discover someone who’s eager to toss the manuals aside.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 33 Mike D'Angelo
    Butler sleepwalks through his thinly written role, and the ostensible tension between the two brothers, flaring up whenever the energy starts to sag, never feels like anything but a bald contrivance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Jane boasts one thing that its predecessors did not: a treasure trove of truly stunning 16mm footage shot in the early 1960s by famed nature photographer Hugo Van Lawick (who would become Goodall’s first husband).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    78/52 is at its best in cinema studies mode, examining specific compositional and editing choices made by Hitchcock and his collaborators.

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