For 706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Wild
Lowest review score: 20 That's My Boy
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 706
706 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Her
    Even a flawed Spike Jonze film is a thing of beauty in its own way, and even the uneven but admirable Her is a journey well worth taking.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    It's also a touch tedious at times, as it's not always clear where Oppenheimer is going.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    Two Days, One Night offers a look into the lives of the everyday workers of the world -- the ones for whom a thousand-euro bonus (about $1,100 U.S.) can solve a heck of a lot of problems.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    What we get is a an intriguing relationship drama, one that is at times darkly funny, at others thought-provoking, but mostly piano-wire tense.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    What Anderson's talky and willfully opaque film doesn't have, however, is an unfailingly compelling story to tell.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    This is a film your preschooler will sit through, and attentively. Better yet, parents who appreciate the artistry of a well-made animated film also stand to be swept up in what is a delightful little tale.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Mike Scott
    It's the same fine line that so often separates artfulness and "trying too hard" -- a line that Lebanon tramples all over.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    These characters are so compelling that their stories are easy to get caught up in. As with "A Separation," Farhadi's drama never strikes a resoundingly false note -- which is a precious thing in movies lately -- and as such is a film that promises moving rewards.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    The resulting slowdown, as well as a significant narrative shift, gives Looper a slightly sprawling and ungrounded feel at times, almost as if the first and second halves are two separate movies.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Does The Wind Rises represent Miyazaki at the top of his game? No, not really. But it could be Miyazaki at the end of the game, and that alone is reason enough to appreciate the film for the things it offers rather than hammer it too hard for the things it lacks.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    While Pina will undoubtedly be well-received by modern-dance devotees, it does little to take advantage of the enormous opportunity to open the door for newcomers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    A fast-moving, fascinating and at times even fun documentary residing squarely at the intersection of sports, geopolitics and history.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    Love is Strange doesn't really have any sort of sense of urgency about it. To the contrary, it feels rather mundane, as their problems -- while both unfortunate and unfair -- feel relatively small when put in perspective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Sometimes the nuts-and-bolts of the story threaten to snag, most often on conversations about the very specific details of Locke's largely humdrum job. It's those moments in particular that keep Locke from ever quite shaking the feeling that it's a gimmick film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Foxcatcher isn't a film many viewers will clamor to rewatch. It's too chilly a film for that. At the same time, it's one that will suck them in -- and it will hold them while they're there.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    No
    You'd think that a movie about such a dynamic moment and such a vibrant ad campaign would be more dynamic and vibrant.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    The sky is far from falling on the Bond franchise. In fact, it is as good as it has ever been. What's more, Craig is reportedly on board for at least two more outings, so Q had better get to work on those bifocals because 007 is no where near ready for retirement.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    This is what makes Anderson's film so infuriating. It's so damned irresistible -- until it becomes so damned insufferable, getting lost in a marijuana fog of poorly explained plot developments and indecipherable twists. Still, it's hard to look away for fear of missing some other equally inspired flourish.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Starred Up isn't just violence for violence's sake. Rather, it is a surprisingly layered, hard-hitting human drama, one that cuts to the bone -- albeit with a homemade prison knife.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Also helping to sell it all is the fact that these films, goofy though they may be, feature a consistently high level of acting. In addition to Pegg, we get Martin Freeman ("The Hobbit"), Paddy Considine ("Red Riding"), Eddie Marsan ("Sherlock Holmes") and Bill Nighy ("Love Actually"), all of whom have appeared previously in the trilogy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    That's some admirably mature stuff for a kid's flick in this day of rampant pandering, but it also helps rob the film of a certain breathless, edge-of-your-seat appeal. In other words, there are lulls here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    This is not a feel-good movie. This is the frigid, hard-to-embrace cinematic opposite of a feel-good movie, in fact -- all wrapped in one long, dark metaphor for depression.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Mike Scott
    Many scenes, like Another Year itself, don't actually go anywhere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    As it is, it's little more than an artful rehash -- which means that anyone who wants closure to the story, or to see justice truly served, will have to wait a little longer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    A Most Violent Year harks back to the cinema tradition of the 1970s, with its deliberate pace, its simmering tension, its gritty cynicism and its central moral dilemma. At the same time, it has something to say about the way business is done in 2015.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Enough Said isn't without the occasional minor formulaic element or the odd narrative contrivance here and there (starting, it must be said, with its very setup). It is, after all, a romantic comedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Mike Scott
    It's that end -- the film's final sobering five minutes -- in which Blue Jasmine is at its most effective. Credit is due there to Blanchett's table-setting performance in it and in the hour and half preceding it. It's also due to the courage Allen displays as a storyteller in ending this particular story in the way it has to end.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    Doesn't rise as much as it flounders and frustrates, in what would appear to be a case of a filmmaker prioritizing ego over efficiency, and engaging in generally muddled storytelling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    It's a theme Mary Shelley brought us in "Frankenstein," which was first published in 1818. That was almost 200 years ago. And while Ex Machina replaces the stitches and neck bolts with gears and fiber-optics, it all feels an awful lot like the same story.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Mike Scott
    There's a good reason why the true-crime film The Imposter is a documentary: If someone tried to pass off this bizarre Texas tale as fiction, nobody would believe it.

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