For 74 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nathan Lee's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 51
Highest review score: 90 Mother of Tears
Lowest review score: 0 Harold
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 74
  2. Negative: 14 out of 74
74 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Nathan Lee
    A loving if routine primer on this bright young man.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Nathan Lee
    The darker side of the story -- how the advent of pro surfing was taken as an act of cultural colonialism by some of the locals -- adds gravity to this otherwise lightweight, if amiable summer diversion.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Nathan Lee
    The movie is, as these things go, enjoyably trashy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Nathan Lee
    There's an itch for this kind of material, and here it is scratched -- to the bone.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Nathan Lee
    Mr. Sharma's film emphasizes testimony over context to such a degree that it feels at first of little use to anyone except gay Muslims who might take comfort in knowing they're not alone. But the documentary gains depth of feeling as it goes and even develops something of a nail-biting narrative.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Limited almost exclusively to tourist attractions, this documentary glimpse at the sights and sounds of occupied Tibet amounts to a rhetorically inflated vacation video.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Like most flower-power nostalgia trips, Eight Miles High has the irksome effect of reminding the audience -- whether too young or too square -- that it missed out on the grooviest moment in history, man. But as these things go, this one goes with flair.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    The First Basket, a functional (if narrowly interesting) history lesson by the filmmaker David Vyorst, recollects the rich history of Jewish participation in basketball.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Starts promisingly, with a sharp comedic bite and genuine compassion for this fraught family dynamic, but soon gives way to the kind of compressed, schematic psychodrama endemic to (if no more welcome on) the stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Directed by Erik Nelson, Dreams recalls the career of a runty young geek who evolved into a world-famous artist -- and ladies' man.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Mr. Pettyfer is no Sean Connery, no Roger Moore, no Pierce Brosnan, no Timothy Dalton and no George Lazenby even, but the director, Geoffrey Sax, compensates for his zero of a hero by indulging the exceedingly amused and amusing supporting cast.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Inoffensive if uninspired.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Despite its empty head and arduous length, Flyboys is ever so nice, in the manner of a Norman Rockwell illustration. The director, Tony Bill, may not be a philosopher but he is a gentleman, moving things along with a tidy, well-mannered hand. In another context, such politesse might feel tonic. Given the state of things, it’s nearly toxic.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    The Doorman, is simply too distracted to hit the comedic bull's-eye. Whatever the case, his movie gets a chuckle or two but mostly will tickle insiders.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    What makes this one different? Absolutely nothing. (Sure, it's based on a true story, but I mean come on, whatever.)
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    As multimillion-dollar frivolities about the pets of the ruling class go, Chihuahua is reasonably diverting. As one that happens to be opening in the middle of an economic meltdown, its mere existence feels utterly insane.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Mindlessly repeats the archetypal "Chainsaw" scenario.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Isn't a movie so much as a devotional object, a kind of secular fetish designed to induce rapture.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Never quite shakes off its aura of second-rate made-for-TV movie, Save Me has a lot of heart but little nerve and no surprise.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Either way, it doesn’t quite go far enough as psychological study or cultural commentary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    The fixation of independent movies on the arrested development of bourgeois dullards may have less to do with the relevance of the topic than the class of people who get to make movies. Whatever the case, James Burke directs from a screenplay by Brent Boyd.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    An overall sense that the movie was infinitely more fun to make than it is to watch.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    As a mechanical thrill ride, The Clone Wars has an uncluttered look and furious pace that make it more or less as satisfying as its wildly overdesigned predecessors.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Tells a colorful if conventional tale of dysfunctional Americans abroad. The misadventures of Jake and Oliver play off against the conflicted sympathies of the locals, who simultaneously resent, enjoy, prosper from and exploit the tourist scene.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Perhaps because the music is so good, with its purity of tone and dazzling rhythmic precision, the flaws of the surrounding movie become all the more obvious.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    It's all good clean fun; the movie is well intentioned to a blandly feminist fault. Just as burlesque loses most of its oomph when put on video -- no art is more dependent on the intimacy of live performance -- self-esteem trips are less compelling to hear about than to experience firsthand.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Nathan Lee
    Mr. Hernández doesn't always grab what he's reaching for -- his talent soars untethered by discipline -- but the thrust of his effort lights up the sky.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 40 Nathan Lee
    Cheap shots and mean spirits abound, as do celebrity cameos (James Woods, Jon Voight, Dennis Hopper, Kelsey Grammer). But it's the laziness of the writing that most offends.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Nathan Lee
    A genuine labor of love -- and a real bore.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Nathan Lee
    A tossed-off comedy from Adam Sandler's production company that makes one long for the comparative genius of "I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry."

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