For 149 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Neil Genzlinger's Scores

  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 90 The Flag: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 Friends with Better Lives: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 149
  2. Negative: 15 out of 149
149 tv reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Sometimes this focus on technology feels a bit heavy-handed, but in general this is a series that seems to be growing more assured as it goes along.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    For the most part, the flexibility that television provides is used to good advantage in The Hollow Crown to clarify the action and enhance the dynamics. Only occasionally does it feel misplaced, as in “Richard II,” when [director Rupert] Goold goes all in with Jesus imagery.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    The new season of this dense medieval fantasy set in a land called Westeros serves up a whole bunch of wartime posturing, a seemingly endless number of would-be rulers and the usual sex and (sometimes in the same scene) violence. But it sure doesn't give viewers much to latch onto.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    An absorbing film by Michael Tucker and Petra Epperlein, has both [insight and subtlety], making it as rewarding as it is thought-provoking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Burns and Ms. Novick, commendably, don't beat you over the head with the obvious lessons for those today who would legislate personal behavior; they largely let the story of Prohibition speak for itself.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    A succinct and well-conceived documentary.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    A blistering, demented animated series.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s a fine show, relying on slow-building tension rather than the gory shock value of series like “The Following,” and the five-episode arc now on Netflix is worth a look if you haven’t had your fill of cat-and-mouse dynamics.... Oddly, the character developed the least may be Ms. Anderson’s.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    Where Sagan’s narrative often approached poetry, Dr. Tyson’s can sound like an overwrought, overamplified planetarium show.... The animation used to present his story resembles low-budget anime and isn’t terribly absorbing. Bruno deserves better. Nit-picking aside, if the new Cosmos doesn’t deliver quite the punch of the original, it’s because this isn’t 1980.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The program has a fair amount of feel-good filler about the bond between the dogs and their handlers, but when it comes to showing these pairs at work, it is blunt and disturbing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The smooth telling of Russo's story juxtaposed against the present day, when gay marriage is sanctioned in some states and gay characters are all over prime-time television, drives home how different the cultural landscape is from the one Russo knew.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    This quietly addictive program isn't really about what goes on inside the Big Apple's single ring. It's about the people, both under the lights and behind them, who make those performances possible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The advice here is to forget the politics and enjoy the performances and the trip back in time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Though these people may not resemble any job seekers you know, the portraits feel about as honest as reality TV gets.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The Challenger investigation story doesn’t have quite the level of malfeasance or the cloak-and-dagger undertones of other movies about real-life government or business debacles. But it still makes for an absorbing tale, one that seems well timed for our current moment of bungled websites, unrestrained eavesdropping and public skepticism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    We have perhaps grown to expect a certain rhythm in these accounts. A mission accomplished amid much bravery and loss. Memories of horror and heroism carried silently for decades. The Ghost Army reminds us that in a conflict as sweeping as the Second World War, not every story fits that template.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Once the annual avalanche of Halloween-themed episodes, specials and movies overtakes TV, you probably don't expect to be using the word "charming" very often. But charming perfectly describes one such entry, Toy Story of Terror!
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Valentine Road, directed by Marta Cunningham, is clear in its sympathy for Mr. King, but it is also bracingly willing to explore other sides of this disturbing case and complex subject.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It's unlikely to achieve television greatness like "M*A*S*H" did, but by Episode 3 it shows signs of becoming an addictive pleasure along the lines of this season's "Revenge."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The language is supposed to be realistic and maybe it is realistic, but it often feels self-conscious, like an overly thick Southern accent. That's too bad, because when Mr. Simon and Edward Burns, who are credited with the writing of the first five episodes, pull back a bit, they sometimes achieve a rough eloquence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The premiere episode tends to lapse into a "You go, girl" mode typical of shallow treatments of disability, with fist-pumping and treacly background music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If the longstanding "SNL" segment is a sort of introductory course in wringing humor from headlines, and Mr. Stewart's "Daily Show" is the advance-level class, Onion News Network is graduate school, requiring much quicker thinking and a greater tolerance for comfort-zone invasion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    A teary, perfectly tolerable collection of interlocking stories featuring lots of recognizable actors and two particularly well-etched segments.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    Sure, it all makes for pretty filmmaking, but isn't not having to risk your life for a simple meal one of the benefits of civilization? There's something unsettling about glorifying subsistence living for the sake of our high-definition televisions.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    If you are reaching the saturation point with this type of sketch work, The Birthday Boys may cause you to sigh at the sameness of it all. But if you’ve stayed away from those other yucksters, these ones provide fairly consistent midlevel laughs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The list of people who have been reviled and labeled, explicitly or subtly, as something less than human is long: blacks, Jews, foreigners, people with AIDS, people with disabilities. Zombies notwithstanding, this appealing series, created and written by Dominic Mitchell, works this territory as credibly as any more conventional drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Just when the crowd thinks it knows where he’s going, he jerks the string and sends things in a different direction, to great effect. It’s a gimmick that takes a refined sense of timing and a mastery of misdirection, and Mr. Cosby, who is 76, shows that he still has both.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It hardly needs saying that Ms. Silverman’s material is not for everybody.... But she isn’t spewing things out randomly, hoping to get by on shock value. The execution is fairly intricate.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The revisiting of Ripper lore, though, is relatively painless, especially since the most interesting character in this series is Edward Buchan (Steve Pemberton), the Ripperologist who tips Chandler to the similarities between the then and the now.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    This isn’t crackpot conspiracy theory stuff; the documentary is as serious and somber as its title.... The film ends with a lengthy list of officials who declined to be interviewed, which leaves it one-sided, and it doesn’t go beyond merely asking that the crash get another look: the intent is not to explore who might have fired any missiles that were fired.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The series ... is full of the same brutal weather and dubious quests as Discovery’s reality shows, but professional actors ... make it a much more compelling attraction than any of that other fare.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    By the end of the second episode, this tasty show starts to reveal that it is not just another identity-swapping story. Something creepily sci-fi is definitely going on.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s hard to imagine even the haters not enjoying Annie: It’s the Hard-Knock Life, From Script to Stage, a delightful documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    This looks like a pretty tasty fantasy drama.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    In Sleepyhead, the better of the two, someone is killing women by inducing strokes....In Scaredy Cat the crimes are just as bizarre, though the outcome is more predictable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Every so often a staff member, usually DiDi, is shown in a quiet moment with a patient, providing actual care. These small scenes end up being surprisingly moving because this fictional hospital unit, in all its ridiculousness, feels somehow true to life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Under the Dome gets off to an addictive start on Monday, so much so that it’s hard to imagine any second-episode falloff in viewership.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    There are interesting tidbits about the history of fashion photography--the racism, the drugs--but not much serious discussion about the cultural consequences of the evolution of the business.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    We’ve come to expect an eclectic mix from the American Horror Story anthology, and the formula works particularly well in this installment, thanks to uninhibited work by the big-name cast.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    It has lots of stunning images, but if there’s a unifying concept, it is apparently going to emerge more gradually than a single episode allows.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Vikings is a mini-series about a band of professional pillagers with a disregard for human life and a relentless focus on gratifying material desires. So it is somewhat surprising that it is also a refreshing study in restraint.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Neil Genzlinger
    The series begins with a tenuous premise, uses it to leap to an inaccurate dichotomy and supports that with tired, unfunny stereotypes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    This may be a case where a little more violence would help make the stakes seem more real. The main issues for these royals and would-be royals are when to bow and to whom.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    Hunted ends up being a competent addition to the high-stakes-snooping genre but not a very surprising one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It would make an interesting documentary even without Mr. Tyson. With him, it becomes a personal test for the viewer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s good for some dumb laughs, and--important in this age when complex television dramas consume so many of our brain cells--it doesn’t demand much of a mental commitment.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The question is whether it has any depth or insight to offer once it [raises your eyebrows]. The evidence provided by the first three episodes is inconclusive.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Beneath all that witty repartee, the two main characters actually have some depth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Billy Campbell anchors the cast admirably as Dr. Alan Farragut.... Mr. Sanada is always intriguing to watch. And some of the show’s support players bring welcome spunk to the claustrophobic world of the research center, especially Catherine Lemieux as Dr. Doreen Boyle, a smart pathologist with a smart mouth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The pilot efficiently sets up the series. All the characters who are introduced have plenty of places they could go.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    [The] preposterously grandiose title really needed to be strung out a bit to give an accurate picture of the program. Something like, "Mankind: The Story of All of Us, Delivered Somewhat Superficially by People You Know and Love, Because We Don't Want to Bore You."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Cold Justice picks up considerably in its second episode and seems as if it might be a worthy addition to the genre.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Would You Rather ...? With Graham Norton on BBC America proves that a fair amount of fun can be generated simply by putting people in chairs and letting them crack wise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    By the end of this documentary, yes, you're convinced that Mr. Lewis was a much larger figure than is generally acknowledged. But you still don't feel as if you know him.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The malaria story, it seems to say, is filmable only if the central figures are white and it is larded up with the kind of button-pushing that television dramas thrive on.... But the scenes in which the two actresses are together have some real power.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The comedy in the show is a grab bag, sometimes subtle, sometimes self-consciously outlandish.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    An eclectic comedy that is smarter than mainstream fare like "Last Man Standing" but still feels like comfort food.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The challenges are too outsize and the format is too confusing to take full advantage of the gimmick.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The good bits are hilarious; the others often kind of just lie there.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    It looks like a zillion other workplace reality shows.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    The show ends up feeling a lot like the short-lived “Go On,” the Matthew Perry sitcom about a therapy group from the fall 2012 season: lots of quirky characters thrown together in the vain hope that something will jell.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    They explore the numbers behind things you thought you knew and things you ought to know, but this is no blackboard exercise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Plenty of places for this series to take its engaging leads, one of the odder crime-fighting pairs on TV, doing battle against one of TV’s creepier-looking if expressionless bad guys.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    This Good Marty/Bad Marty dynamic may prove more fruitful for the show in the long run than the well-worn punching bag that is corporate America.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Neil Genzlinger
    Trophy Wife is forced-frivolity mush.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Ground Floor doesn’t make much of an impression initially. But stick with it for three or four episodes and it grows on you.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It takes things nice and easy, ending with a lot still to be conveyed as to who is who and what is what in this lush show about the police and the mob in 1947 Los Angeles. But your patience is likely to be rewarded. Episode 2, also being shown on Wednesday, brings things nicely into focus, and prospects seem good that this six-episode series will be a satisfying trip back in time.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    A spunky upgrade over the collection of interchangeable police procedurals clogging the television schedule.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    An able cast led by Andie MacDowell and Dylan Neal makes it stand out from the stream of interchangeable Hallmark movies that aim for the same tone and audience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    Too many of the other characters’ crises seem boilerplate, giving the whole enterprise the feel of a condensed soap opera or an exercise from a playwriting class.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The writers of the series have left themselves plenty of possibilities to explore, and Mr. Wilson seems more than capable of carrying the show anyplace they choose to take it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The details of those bargains and interrelationships among the inhabitants of the Drake will no doubt be fleshed out in subsequent episodes. But the premiere, at least, hasn't found a way to make this odd mix of high-end real estate and B-movie occultism compelling enough that you're eager for more.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The mini-series and its characters are all over the map, stylistically, seeming unable to find the right tone for the time period.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    Dorian has potential, but Kennex, at least in the pilot, is as grim and humorless as they come. He needs to loosen up.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The interactions among the core four men are the key, and the likable actors playing them make most of the scenes work.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The program may not contain any startling revelations about its five principal subjects, Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, J. P. Morgan and Henry Ford. But based on the first episode, it certainly gives them a modern-day relevance, perhaps unintentionally.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    Without the underpinning of droll characters who make you feel their pain, this Inbetweeners is mostly predictable and vulgar.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Treat Williams has rarely looked as comfortable as he does in Everwood, a promising new drama full of wry touches that has its debut tonight on WB. Now if he would just get rid of that annoying teenage son!
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The intricacies may make it harder for new viewers to crack the show without doing some catch-up watching, but they also make it far more absorbing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The gore is plentiful, the tone is inconsistent, and by the end only one thing is undeniably clear: Mockingbird Lane is a very different creature from "The Munsters."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s all served up with a pulpy prurience.... And the back stories are doled out slowly, so viewers who haven’t read the show’s source material, a book by Kelley Armstrong, should expect to feel pleasantly teased.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It seems that international crime fighting has the same wearying turf wars as American police work and that border-crossing serial killers practice the same sorts of sadistic violence against women that domestic ones often do.... Still, Crossing Lines makes for satisfying viewing; with Mr. Fichtner’s and Mr. Lavoine’s performances it might continue to do so for the summer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The adaption takes liberties with Stevenson's tale that some will find unforgivable. But viewers open to experimentation will enjoy simply seeing if they agree with the choices the filmmakers made in their what-if game.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Storage Wars is an especially entertaining addition to the genre. Who doesn't love the sound of an auctioneer's voice? Beyond that, the four buyers on whom the show focuses are well chosen, and the "reveals"--the moments when the buyers see what they've acquired and get estimates of its value--are great fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    If the various kinks work themselves out, The Finder will at the least be a medium-strength entry in the increasingly crowded field of comedy-dramas featuring eccentric characters.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The surprise is that at least from the peppy pilot, it’s possible that this might actually work reasonably well.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    It may turn into one of those crime shows that are competent enough but, well, forgettable, despite Ms. Montgomery's charms.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If Mr. Spielberg’s "Lincoln" achieves greatness largely through the detailed performances of Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and others, Killing Lincoln also has details to recommend it--historical details, the kind of tidbits that (along with Mr. Hanks’s assured narration) can hold your attention, even though the tale is familiar.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    The scripts are efficient. The acting is decent. But you're likely to find yourself just waiting for the familiar crises and character complications to come along, and sure enough, they do.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Because everyone in the Duck dynasty has a well-defined role and sticks to it, the bit works. So does the show.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Neil Genzlinger
    American Gypsies, the second deplorable show about this subculture to come along in three months.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    [Coma] is sometimes entertaining, sometimes infuriating.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s a solid start, and were this the first series of its kind, King & Maxwell would seem like a sure hit. That it’s working the same territory as various other well-made shows costs it some luster, but it could still settle in as a reliable schedule filler.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Neil Genzlinger
    TLC is a place to turn to for sideshows, and this new reality series is certainly that.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The real stars are the designers, and it's an eclectic bunch, some already working in the industry, others who dream to.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The competitors may not be all that amusing, but some of the show's gimmicks are.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    All this is interesting enough to watch once. The premiere, though, doesn't do much to establish the kind of dynamics--sibling rivalries, simmering romance-- that serve as subplots for these types of shows.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    When Salem isn’t being deliberately outrageous, it’s cultivating a dynamic that could be fruitful as things move along.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Neil Genzlinger
    There are so many vampires and undeads and such on television these days that this crew is going to have a hard time getting attention, especially if the show continues to be as much of a grab bag as the pilot episode is. Some serious focusing--on specific story lines, specific characters--should be the first order of business.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Neil Genzlinger
    If your taste runs to old formulas slickly employed, Deception will hold your interest. If you prefer innovation, it probably won't.