Neil Genzlinger

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For 368 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Neil Genzlinger's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 368
368 tv reviews
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Neil Genzlinger
    The new season offers even more [with casting], with delicious results.... An entertaining season of this sublime series.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    [David Attenborough] has eschewed the soapbox in favor of subtlety. This program (the series producer is Tom Hugh-Jones) does, too, for the most part.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    For the most part, the flexibility that television provides is used to good advantage in The Hollow Crown to clarify the action and enhance the dynamics. Only occasionally does it feel misplaced, as in “Richard II,” when [director Rupert] Goold goes all in with Jesus imagery.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Sometimes this focus on technology feels a bit heavy-handed, but in general this is a series that seems to be growing more assured as it goes along.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Yes, the series sometimes grows a bit preachy: This installment, like its predecessors, tends to indulge in extended scenes whose dialogue can sound as if it were from a PBS documentary or a newspaper exposé. But you have to admire the ability of Mr. Ridley and his actors to wrap the earnestness in a compelling package.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The presentation is familiar, maybe a little too familiar, by now: actors reading journal entries; vintage photographs lovingly panned; historians adding commentary.... But Mr. Burns, cutting between [Theodore and Franklin's] life stories, probes the intersections with playful insight.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    An absorbing film by Michael Tucker and Petra Epperlein, has both [insight and subtlety], making it as rewarding as it is thought-provoking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Burns and Ms. Novick, commendably, don't beat you over the head with the obvious lessons for those today who would legislate personal behavior; they largely let the story of Prohibition speak for itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    A succinct and well-conceived documentary.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    In any given episode, all three of these actresses may be called upon for slapstick comedy (for Ms. Metcalf, in the season premiere, there’s an outlandish scene in a bathroom stall), deadpan humor and actual pathos, since their patients are often frail, facing dementia or outright dying. And they deliver with nuanced performances that turn quick glances or sighs into punch lines.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    A blistering, demented animated series.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The movie, adapted by Mr. Kramer and directed by Ryan Murphy, simultaneously exposes some of the play’s flaws and finds alternate sources of power in the story.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Some comics are natural actors, but Ms. Butcher and Ms. Esposito aren’t, which makes for awkward moments, especially when the show tries to hit a somber or intimate note. But the clunkiness also gives Take My Wife a weird sort of honesty.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s a vehicle for two graying actors that gives both a chance for tour-de-force performances, and in the new television version Monday on Starz, a couple of esteemed veterans, Anthony Hopkins and Ian McKellen, get about as much out of the tale as there is to get.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    As with most things Forrest tries in this drolly hilarious show, neither goes quite as planned.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    National Treasure is a beautifully drawn portrait of ugliness, impeccably written and acted, yet painful to absorb.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    In its first season, Difficult People distinguished itself with such fast-paced, snippy dialogue, but the show has become more than just a series of quick jokes. The writing has grown increasingly intricate.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Neil Genzlinger
    The core portion of Jackie Robinson’s story is so familiar that Part 1 of the new Ken Burns treatment of it may not seem like vital viewing. But Part 2 examines Robinson’s later, less celebrated years, completing a portrait of an eventful life that, in the popular mind, is often confined to the ball field.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The program has a fair amount of feel-good filler about the bond between the dogs and their handlers, but when it comes to showing these pairs at work, it is blunt and disturbing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    As with all of the best examples of this genre--this film was not made to provide a feel-good moment that enables us to go back to forgetting about the bombing and those most affected by it. It was made to remind us that recovery is far harder and more complex than we realize.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Absurdity is the only real agenda here, and The Tick hits that target. Whether that is enough remains to be seen. The daffiest shows sometimes flame out early, and in its aggressive incongruity The Tick is certainly a descendant of "Police Squad," an experimental classic that lasted just a few episodes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Maron may not delve that deeply [into substance abuse]--by Episode 2 of the new season, Marc is showing signs that he’s the same irksome guy in rehab that he was before. But if nothing else, the premiere does effectively, yet comedically, show two truths of substance abuse: Addicts need enablers who fuel their problem, either deliberately or inadvertently, and most need someone to intervene to help them climb out of the pit.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s an exceedingly watchable history lesson.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    This is a thoughtful series that lingers over death rather than using it for shock value; one that finds its story lines in small power struggles rather than gruesome palace coups.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The whole enterprise is wrapped in a big-budget look and served with a respect for the ability of young minds to perceive offbeat, incongruous humor, the very quality that made the books so successful in the first place.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s a fine show, relying on slow-building tension rather than the gory shock value of series like “The Following,” and the five-episode arc now on Netflix is worth a look if you haven’t had your fill of cat-and-mouse dynamics.... Oddly, the character developed the least may be Ms. Anderson’s.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The smooth telling of Russo's story juxtaposed against the present day, when gay marriage is sanctioned in some states and gay characters are all over prime-time television, drives home how different the cultural landscape is from the one Russo knew.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The advice here is to forget the politics and enjoy the performances and the trip back in time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    This quietly addictive program isn't really about what goes on inside the Big Apple's single ring. It's about the people, both under the lights and behind them, who make those performances possible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Though these people may not resemble any job seekers you know, the portraits feel about as honest as reality TV gets.

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