Neil Genzlinger

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For 384 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Neil Genzlinger's Scores

Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 384
384 tv reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The advice here is to forget the politics and enjoy the performances and the trip back in time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    This quietly addictive program isn't really about what goes on inside the Big Apple's single ring. It's about the people, both under the lights and behind them, who make those performances possible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Though these people may not resemble any job seekers you know, the portraits feel about as honest as reality TV gets.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    We have perhaps grown to expect a certain rhythm in these accounts. A mission accomplished amid much bravery and loss. Memories of horror and heroism carried silently for decades. The Ghost Army reminds us that in a conflict as sweeping as the Second World War, not every story fits that template.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The Challenger investigation story doesn’t have quite the level of malfeasance or the cloak-and-dagger undertones of other movies about real-life government or business debacles. But it still makes for an absorbing tale, one that seems well timed for our current moment of bungled websites, unrestrained eavesdropping and public skepticism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Once the annual avalanche of Halloween-themed episodes, specials and movies overtakes TV, you probably don't expect to be using the word "charming" very often. But charming perfectly describes one such entry, Toy Story of Terror!
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If you loved the baseball film “Major League” but always wished Bob Uecker’s broadcaster character had been darker and more bawdy, this is your show.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The language is supposed to be realistic and maybe it is realistic, but it often feels self-conscious, like an overly thick Southern accent. That's too bad, because when Mr. Simon and Edward Burns, who are credited with the writing of the first five episodes, pull back a bit, they sometimes achieve a rough eloquence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It's unlikely to achieve television greatness like "M*A*S*H" did, but by Episode 3 it shows signs of becoming an addictive pleasure along the lines of this season's "Revenge."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    Sure, it all makes for pretty filmmaking, but isn't not having to risk your life for a simple meal one of the benefits of civilization? There's something unsettling about glorifying subsistence living for the sake of our high-definition televisions.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Valentine Road, directed by Marta Cunningham, is clear in its sympathy for Mr. King, but it is also bracingly willing to explore other sides of this disturbing case and complex subject.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Beneath the light moments and the spy-versus-spy stuff, the series has a perspective that makes it refreshing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    You say darker, I say richer. ... Ms. James and Mr. Thomson lend the stability of skilled veterans to the proceedings, which helps Ms. McNulty do the difficult work of selling a complicated character who is simultaneously vulnerable and proud, self-denying and self-absorbed, practical and prone to fantasy. Her portrayal isn’t seamless, but it’s endearing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The premiere episode tends to lapse into a "You go, girl" mode typical of shallow treatments of disability, with fist-pumping and treacly background music.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    A teary, perfectly tolerable collection of interlocking stories featuring lots of recognizable actors and two particularly well-etched segments.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The work is different, but personality-wise, Archer and his comrades are much the same. At least at first. The show seems to be giving itself license to explore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The series is structured as an ever-evolving medical detective story, but the filmmakers give it heart as well by juxtaposing the history lessons with present-day personal profiles of cancer patients.... It’s a well-conceived approach to a subject that in other hands might have been dry. Still, be prepared to give it your full attention.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The series has a sprawling cast and high production values, yet it starts off rather generically--bearded men playing with swords, battling over territory.... Hang around until Episode 3, though, and substantive themes begin to take shape that give this series a distinctive personality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The change in structure [expanding to four POVs] certainly helps the series, which though one of TV’s more ambitious writing experiments was beginning to seem limited by its own gimmick.... True, the consequences of the affair that set the series in motion are substantial and never-ending, but it’s all coated in an idyllic sheen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Mr. Cranston keeps it watchable with a performance that grows ever more fervent but never goes over the top.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    [David Holbrooke] puts just enough of himself and his extended family into The Diplomat to give it some audience-friendly poignancy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    Yes, the show will be funny, in an innocuous sort of way, if it continues to stay off that pulpit. But if it becomes a little less cautious occasionally, it might rise from merely diverting to important.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s built on sharp writing and equally sharp acting, as any good series needs to be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If the longstanding "SNL" segment is a sort of introductory course in wringing humor from headlines, and Mr. Stewart's "Daily Show" is the advance-level class, Onion News Network is graduate school, requiring much quicker thinking and a greater tolerance for comfort-zone invasion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    This is a deceptively difficult form to nail; often those who try end up with little more than a collection of flatulence jokes. Done right, though, as it is in "Galavant," a mindless comedy is not the same as a dumb comedy. It’s smart, just in a carefree way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    If your own family is anything like the clan in this delightfully demented show, seek help immediately.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The Detour is the kind of show that is best consumed in extended viewing. Individually, its episodes can seem slapdash and gratuitously crass. But there’s a theme beneath the ribaldry, one that may leave you pondering just how much you really know about that person sitting or sleeping next to you.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    John Oliver, a graduate of “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart,” didn’t exactly break the mold when he rolled out his new show, Last Week Tonight, late on Sunday on HBO; he just tugged at it a bit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Neil Genzlinger
    The revisiting of Ripper lore, though, is relatively painless, especially since the most interesting character in this series is Edward Buchan (Steve Pemberton), the Ripperologist who tips Chandler to the similarities between the then and the now.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    For the most part, though, The A Word feels true and honest. Other shows that have used characters with disabilities for secondary plotlines have often seemed simplistic or glib, going for quick tears or feel-good moments. This one’s unblinking, and more powerful for it.

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