Nick Pinkerton
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For 293 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Pinkerton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Little Fugitive (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 30 Beats
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 99 out of 293
  2. Negative: 45 out of 293
293 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    It's all slight enough to blow away, and rare enough to warrant seeing it before it does.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    The Dry Land does slip inside the inescapable, closed-circle logic of despair, and O'Nan's shy, precarious performance keeps you with him to the edge of the abyss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    With a small, well-chosen cast, sly script, and slippery, ambivalent characters, The Last Exorcism gives a welcome titty-twist to the demonic-possession movie revival.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    An epic by Scandinavian standards, Manus's period re-creation is lavish-but the too-polished rental décor doesn't create a living past.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Devotees will perhaps find something new in this deep pool of archival footage, and newcomers will get an appropriate introduction to the beguiling charisma of a most media-savvy isolationist.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    It's good enough at least that you wish it was better.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Vision is more immediate and immersive when dealing in the jealous attachments among sisters; when circumstance and politics tear Richardis from Hildegard, Sukowa's performance rears to towering heights of abjection.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    This self-consciously modern movie contains classical pleasures.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Apted seems too often to think like an old-hand action director and not enough like the 12-year-old boy who probably read Lewis's book. To enter Narnia, to really go giddy with the bright, laughing promise of a quest, a young viewer with no convenient magic portal of his own needs characters to bring him along. This is, I believe, the difference between a classic and a successful franchise reboot.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Ry Russo-Young's character study of a gal passing the worst years of her life in cool North Brooklyn, leads off with a scene that lets you know right away that you're in the good hands of a young director sensitive to the idiosyncratic details that breathe life into a movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    The group is frequently drunk, but writer-director Joseph Infantolino's handling is lucid, a necessity to keep up the sense of vague dread and walking-on-eggshell egos.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Leyser's collation of interviews and stock footage is polished enough to effectively perpetuate the Burroughs legend.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    With erratic success, Heartless tries a number of different veins-urban fairy tale with "There was no magic, it was you all along" twist, supernatural family drama-but it's on firmest footing as a macabre comedy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    de Oliveira's film is a musical of a sort, its quietude occasionally lifted by work songs or chorales.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Kekilli, more than an unofficial spokeswoman for rebellious Euro-Muslim youth, sells a simple and deterministic story through her sheer presence and precise reaction shots.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    We need visionaries-but also solid craftsmen who seem to enjoy their work. Insidious is the product of the latter. It doesn't build a better haunted house but, when on its game, reminds us of the genre's pleasures.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Perhaps something important was spirited away with the 20 minutes of footage shorn for this U.S. release, but the combatants are scarcely distinguishable here even before disappearing under layers of mud and guts.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Director Alan Parker (still living) nicely describes the tightrope teeter of Cardiff's hothouse imagery: "It's great art, and then it will be kitsch, and then it will be art again." Or is he summing up cinema itself?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    The self-esteem booster shot provided by the sudden discovery of a prodigious talent is conveyed in a shy, self-surprised amusement by Onetto, accompanied by the slightest loosening of the joints.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    The best bits - the powerful instrument called Five Blind Boys of Mississippi, for example - more than speak for themselves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Delhi Belly's rare singing-and-dancing production numbers play classical Bollywood glitz for pure kitsch, the Ram Sampath–composed soundtrack otherwise tending toward up-tempo sing-along rock, including a hit song ("DK Bose") with a subliminally dirty chorus.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Carpenter does what he's always done well here: individualizing shorthand personalities in a group under siege. This is Carpenter's first all-female ensemble, and the inmates are uniformly well-played.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    One senses that The Guard is McDonagh's eulogy for the brusque, warts-and-all character of a passing generation of tough, working-class Irishmen, much as Clint Eastwood's "Gran Torino" was for vintage Americanism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Park's view - clearly inscribed in his well-structured, practically chapter-headed ("After Hours," "Payday," "Back at the Village") documentary - is that the hideous working conditions and low wages are due to man-made avarice; the workers, though, tend toward a fatalism based in religious predestination.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Scenes showing the tricky process of acclimatizing a child to new surroundings, and the patchwork of experiences that make up an education - both Asia's and Tairo's - are grounded by entirely affectless performances, not least that of little Asia Crippa.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    More than the marquee names, the second bananas keep the movie bobbing along: Broderick's pharmaceutically vague hangdog act is perfect ("If you need me, I'll be living in this box"), while Peña turns out to be a fine comedian, an enthusiastically yipping dumb puppy here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    There's an overapplication of split-screen and woozy soundtrack cues to this end, but Lister Jones and Rosen do an appealing back-and-forth with lively dialogue, not dulled in the interest of realism.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Arthur was made, in co-production with Sony, by Aardman Animations, the U.K. company best known for Nick Park's Wallace & Gromit shorts, and the character animation has some of the same homely charm.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Though the PR bit is right on, Khodorkovsky goes some way toward questioning the guilt.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Like one of its yakuza bigs, Outrage commands respect but no affection.