For 717 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 15.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 46
Highest review score: 100 The Lords of Salem
Lowest review score: 0 The Walking Deceased
Score distribution:
717 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    With the survivors' physical presence amongst Nazi slaughterhouses as its own powerful statement, Buried Prayers is a nonfiction work that confronts Holocaust atrocities from a piercing ground-level view.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    At once a disturbing vision of escape, a cautious portrait of liberation, and an exploration of authenticity and artificiality.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Hop
    Despite its scattered frenzy, Hop-thanks to its fondness for smushing together seemingly incongruous elements and Marsden's goofy, bug-eyed mugging-is just demented enough to deliver a fleeting sugar rush.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    It’s a singularly off-kilter vision of repurposed invention, though even at 72 minutes, the film struggles to keep itself afloat, its central conceit too slender to maintain its sense of mirth or wonder.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    It's a film that paints a potent portrait of an artist of righteous, controlled fury.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Foreign Parts engages in sociological inquiry without narration or contextual handholding, utilizing incisive, striking aesthetics (a panorama of hanging side mirrors, worn shoes trudging through grimy puddles) to elicit potent subcultural immersion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Although Angèle's religious faith and Frédéric's belief in luck seem like strained attempts at adding heft to the material, the film nevertheless works up a potent dramatic restlessness, derived from the push-pull between an entitled, obsessive Frédéric and Bellucci's quietly chaotic Angèle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Prospects are dim no matter where these people choose to reside, and A River Changes Course captures their struggle with an ethnographic gaze that generally maintains enough detachment to avoid excessive, judgmental handwringing and heartstring-tugging.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Emphasizing action over the spoken word, The Salvation doesn't break new ground, yet its murderous twists of fate are consistently compelling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Taking the macro view, [Fulton and Pepe] seem to miss out on the types of thorny micro details — about McGee’s relationship with his mother, or about Viland’s own history preceding her tenure at Black Rock — that would have provided additional complexity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    With an insightfulness born from firsthand experience, Rocks in My Pockets posits depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia as conditions that, though potentially lethal, remain manageable, if only through persistent battle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Yadav pinpoints the various ways in which institutional and personal prejudices keep people enslaved, crafting a sharp portrait of gender inequality.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film exhibits a contemplative quiet and attentiveness to detail that enhances its issues of regret, bitterness, and confusion, many of which are rooted in thorny parent-child relations.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film is anchored and greatly bolstered by Bloom, who delivers a performance of quietly escalating madness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    An old-fashioned tale of heroism in the face of insurmountable odds, The Finest Hours is never less than aggressively hokey and manipulatively sentimental — and, in the end, better off for it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Opting to leave somewhat open the question of whether its subject was a traitor to her Jewish people or a conscientious scholar determined to conduct rational analysis free of public and peer pressure, it remains a mildly intriguing drama of the often unavoidable and contentious intersection of intellectual analysis and personal prejudices.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Identifying the method behind the Coens’ madness takes some work, as the film moves at such a rat-a-tat-tat screwball speed that following along often feels like clinging for dear life to the side of a speeding train.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Brash, brutal, and simplistic in equal measure, it’s a retrograde work that, for better and worse, delivers its old-school mayhem with punishing precision and unrepentant glee.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Lian Lunson’s camera allows the music to take center stage via straightforward, graceful compositions—close-ups and medium shots dominate, and edits are kept to a relative minimum—that allow for long, unbroken views of the artists at forceful, mournful work.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Waters’ comedy — like its forerunner — comes impressively close to elevating cursing to an art form, especially when wielded by Thornton and Cox, who spit and sneer vulgar invectives at each other like gutter-trash virtuosos.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    It’s a stagy setup whose theatrical roots are always front and center, yet it’s one that’s handled with aplomb by director Volker Schlöndorff (The Tin Drum), whose latest has enough visual panache to compensate for the static, conversational nature of the work.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Tommy Lee Jones provides wisecracking levity as Rogers's commanding officer, Hayley Atwell supplies the aforementioned buxom chest and accompanying tough-girl grit as Rogers's British love interest, and Johnson directs with flair, his set pieces defined by both muscularity and clarity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    At its best, Magic Trip evokes the freewheeling, idealistic, psychedelic vibe of an era's origins; at worst, it's a film in which people narrate their own druggie home movies.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Bolstered by deft editing that keeps the proceedings moving at a light, graceful clip, this behind-the-runway look at one of fashion's legendary brands has a sleek, efficient stylishness in keeping with its subject.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Wholly uninterested in puffing up his subjects into an iconic rock outfit on a par with their idols Led Zeppelin and the Who, Crowe instead merely tells their story free from the constraints of rise-fall-rise clichés.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    An outrageous based-on-real-life tale that's perfectly suited to director Michael Bay's insanely overblown stylistic and thematic temperament.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    From a purely suspenseful vantage point, Big Bad Wolves is an efficient and effective beast.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Raze leaves the background particulars about this competition oblique, partly because it adds a layer of ominous mystery, but primarily because it doesn't matter; witnessing women-on-women violence is the thing here, regardless of any narrative context.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Its performances are resourceful and affecting, with Chastain and Worthington in the past sequences, and Mirren and Wilkinson in the later chapters, exuding a complicated mess of responsibility, guilt, sacrifice, revenge, and regret.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    If its plotting can be slight, the film's restraint and earnestness help prevent it from ever tipping over into outright mawkishness, and its performances similarly avoid over-the-top histrionics.

Top Trailers