For 82 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 16.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 43
Highest review score: 100 The Lords of Salem
Lowest review score: 0 Vampires Suck
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 82
  2. Negative: 26 out of 82
82 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Schager
    Rob Zombie understands horror as an aural-visual experience that should gnaw at the nerves, seep into the subconscious, and beget unshakeable nightmares.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Nick Schager
    Israel's fractured psyche is plumbed via narrative splintering in Policeman, Nadav Lapid's compelling drama about his homeland's burgeoning social unrest.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    It's Gruber's own remembrances (and a wealth of accompanying archival photos and film footage) that best mark her life as a case study in pioneering feminist courage, ambition and individualism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Summer Wars surprisingly celebrates togetherness and bravery as much as binary-mathematics expertise, all helped along by a kick-ass synthesis of traditional hand-drawn scenes and fluid, rainbow-explosive CG artistry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Writer-director Freida Lee Mock’s concise and potent chronicle uses a wealth of archival video and numerous new interviews with its subject to properly contextualize Hill’s testimony as a landmark moment in the fight for gender equality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Schager
    Sweetgrass achieves a borderline abstract splendor that's furthered by the directors' avoidance of delving deeply into its human subjects, whose backstories and general circumstances are only alluded to through fly-on-wall scraps.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Schager
    Content to faithfully hew to convention, A Single Shot rarely surprises, but its portrait of foolishness and fallibility, and its atmosphere of inevitable doom, remain sturdy and captivating.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Schager
    A blistering portrait of rebellion against social discord, marginalization and oppression, and a call to arms for true democratic ideals of dignity, justice, and fairness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    An outrageous based-on-real-life tale that's perfectly suited to director Michael Bay's insanely overblown stylistic and thematic temperament.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    J.C. Chandor creates an austere snapshot of human struggle, ingenuity, and perseverance, one that's predicated on Robert Redford's fantastic performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    From a purely suspenseful vantage point, Big Bad Wolves is an efficient and effective beast.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Schager
    Raze leaves the background particulars about this competition oblique, partly because it adds a layer of ominous mystery, but primarily because it doesn't matter; witnessing women-on-women violence is the thing here, regardless of any narrative context.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Cribbing from countless Tinseltown efforts, this music-video-cum-perfume-ad is awash in excessively melodramatic flashbacks, car chases and references to the domestic illegal-immigration debate.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The result is a work that radiates a boozy, Bukowski-esque downward spiral, all alcohol-fueled anger and aimless sadness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    An overall lack of adventurousness negates any genuine sense of surprise, but credit this Indian-themed indie for spicing up a familiar and routine dish with reasonably tasty flavor.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    With both hostility and compassion, the damaged duo slowly come to understand themselves and their respective pain-a familiar path that's energized by subtle lead performances, a tactile sense of place and surprising insight into the way people connect as they help each other heal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Overflowing with super-slow motion, color filters and the clunkiest of flashbacks, The Last Lions frequently amplifies the melodrama to borderline-excessive proportions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    A gonzo, if somewhat gimmicky, approach to advocating healthy living; it's like Super Size Me in reverse.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Director Leanne Pooley's documentary on the sisters and their "anarchist variety act" is definitely a formulaic bit of portraiture, but given its engaging, pioneering subjects, gimmickry is hardly needed to spice things up.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The director's righteous anger is less restrained than his conventional vérité aesthetics and less off-putting than his one-sided approach to the issues at hand - an advocacy for alternative wind-turbine energy is suspiciously sketchy - yet he smartly allows coal-exploiting bigwigs plenty of screen time to properly hang themselves.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The Best and the Brightest's sharp one-liners and strong cast, especially McDonald's gleefully lecherous performance as an unabashed Republican pervert, help make it a sturdy bit of subculture-tweaking silliness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The burgeoning relationship between both the athletes, bonding over a kindred "otherness," is handled tastefully by director Kaspar Heidelbach, though the lack of new insights on the subject of National Socialism's wickedness ultimately reduces a well-staged film to a historical footnote.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    While that mood is ultimately a bit too monotonous to be completely persuasive, a strong cast convincingly captures the many ways in which adulthood proves far more complicated than what's imagined at 18.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Anderson utilizes slow-motion 3-D to hyperbolic effect while again casting Jovovich as the epitome of badass sexiness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Long Shot confirms that achieving one's goals is rarely possible without the staunch support of others.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The fictional filmmaker's rejection of "quirkiness" ends up, ironically, being embraced by the movie itself, but even at its most sitcomish, Karpovsky and Lowe's banter has a contentious authenticity that recognizes these industry grunts as vital and three-dimensional-no matter their nominal supporting status.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Modest and affecting, it’s a portrait of the possibility of finding peace, contentment and self through both music and spirituality.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    42
    The film elevates the story of Jackie Robinson to that of cornball legend rather than just honoring his legitimately uplifting, heroic saga by telling it straight.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    Like far too many modern horror films, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane flaunts its knowledge of classic genre fundamentals but fails to do anything very clever or surprising with them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    Ridiculousness played with a straight face, the film is endearing even if it's never quite hilarious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    Director Declan Lowney's film operates from a conceit that affords only minor opportunities for true hilarity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Merely a paint-by-numbers condemnation of social intolerance. It's a slog of a sermon.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Despite the subtitles, it's basically a slice of formulaic Hollywood-style mythmaking, writ large and woefully empty.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    A dog in wolf's clothing, Lionsgate's drab, anthropomorphic animal saga does little more than reconfirm the preeminence of Pixar.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    This behind-the-curtain portrait winds up revealing only the most superficial-and glaringly obvious-of truths.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    There's only one thing worse than a leaden moral fable that tackles issues of forgiveness with sledgehammer contrivances, and that's one that attempts to mask its manipulative corniness with an air of trumped-up gravity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Remember the "Seinfeld" episode in which Jerry and Elaine try to become friends with benefits, and set up unsustainable ground rules for their new arrangement? Imagine it rewritten by the Romantic Comeditron 2000 as a profanity-laced schmaltzfest, and you've got this tone-deaf dud.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Unfortunately, Mumbai Diaries addresses these weighty concerns with such delicacy that they barely make an impact, thus calling further undue attention to the creakiness of the warhorse plot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The movie's overall lack of imagination is the real tragedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Queen to Play does slightly buck convention by depicting intellectual development (rather than lovey-dovey triumph) as the key to reshaping identity, as well as a form of class advancement and spiritual enlightenment. Such notions, however, are drowned out by deafeningly creaky conventions of cutesy self-discovery.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The movie's infrequent martial-arts centerpieces deliver the feeblest of punches.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Jig
    Class, gender and ethnic issues get pushed to the sidelines in favor of rote who-will-win suspense; all that finger-crossing and Lucky Charms flavoring, however, doesn't keep Jig from being just another in a long line of nonfiction soft-shoe routines.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The repeated sight of people watching video monitors or communicating with others via laptops becomes a stilted, gimmicky affectation, and there are only so many times you can watch a camera panning and zooming over still photos before your tolerance for the Ken Burns effect reaches its limit.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The star and co-director appears hopelessly out of place, trapped in a variety of awkward-fitting uniforms while forced to offer up laughably obvious battlefield advice ("Avoid gunfire!").
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    It's a saga whose clichéd corniness would be practically sinful if not for the mighty Gugino, who almost counteracts the material's pap with megawatt charm and steel-tough resolve - exemplified by a low-angled intro shot of the poised, strutting, tight-sweater-sexy actress.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The documentary soon becomes just a chronologically structured update of continuing progress, one that functions like a mildly engaging but generally inconclusive "Time" magazine feature. Anybody throwing the word revenge around right now is being a tad premature.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Content to be a typical piece of tween rural-versus-urban fluff from the old Hannah Montana: The Movie mold. Such lazy complacency is almost enough to make you see red.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Whether sleuthing or smacking around thugs, Sisley makes a dashing hero, but this glossy action flick is heavy on tedious convolutions and depressingly light on character depth, suspense or political-economic intrigue.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    No matter how sensitive the orchestral-string score gets, the film can't locate the bone-deep sense of tragedy of Leslie Schwartz's novel - it just keeps belching out empty, grief-stricken histrionics devoid of insight.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The paeans about national pride and brotherhood may be regional, but constant slow-motion battle scenes and squishy sentimentality are strictly wanna-be Tinseltown.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The lesson here, apparently, is that driven women just need to lighten up and stop being selfish - a message that really does feel backward.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Director Jacob Rosenberg's approach is heavy with archival footage and interviews, yet oddly features almost nothing from Way himself; his puzzling absence for most of the film turns the project into less of a biography than a one-note hagiography.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Defined by "Three’s Company"–grade humor, this attempt at male-anxiety cringe-comedy is little more than a sitcom writ large that — courtesy of several awkward transitional fades to black — already feels constructed to accommodate commercial breaks.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    It’s too busy pleasing itself with lame references to (among others) Eddie Vedder and Hillary Clinton that suggest the film believes old stuff is funny because, you know, it’s old.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Despite the usual end-of-world crisis and Mount Olympus MVP characters, there’s no sense that anything’s truly at stake; rather, it feels as if the filmmakers are coasting on the fumes of teen-angst fantasy and making up their fairy-tale rules (Cyclopes are fireproof!) as they go along.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Getaway cares little about plot and even less about credibility (cue a pouty-mouthed Gomez spouting nuggets of wisdom about computer servers and ISPs). If you can’t even deliver blatant car-nography, what’s the point?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Schager
    The action is perfunctory and forgettable, albeit no more so than the script's range of clichés.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Schager
    Ben Stiller's aesthetics blend overly manicured imagery with soaring rock songs that underline every emotion, lest the film's corporate logo-driven message-making didn't get the point across clearly enough.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Nick Schager
    For a film about a killing machine who can see at night, it's fittingly ironic that the film itself is, both narratively and visually, a dark, muddled mess.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Nick Schager
    Guy Ritchie may have creatively moved on from his Tarantino-inspired debut, but international crime cinema has not, as again evidenced by Magnus Martens's film.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    It's the wooden plotting and cornball sentimentality--and, most unpleasant of all, the full-frontal nudity of Jamie Kennedy--that truly make this AVN-themed fairy tale, ahem, hard to swallow
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    From a bevy of cheesy jolt scares (alarm clock! barking dog!) to the embarrassing sight of Zellweger and Ian McShane treating this Orphan-style B-movie silliness with grave seriousness, the film proves to be one hokey-horror riot.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Even with the grungy aesthetics and earnest preaching, Inhale is really nothing but crass topical exploitation, milking this social issue for every salacious drop.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    It's simply one wearisome '90s crime-cinema cliché after another.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    The film succeeds only in turning one's stomach via implausibilities, inanities and the unwelcome sight of Brian Dennehy's naked ass.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Further marred by second-rate 3-D and the sort of cornball one-liners that even a fairy godmother couldn't love, it's a tolerance-testing tale that puts the grim in Grimm.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Michael Goldbach's pretentious take on identity development is woefully lacking in either subversive humor or genuine pathos; the overwrought end-of-the-world backdrop of a rampaging serial killer and a toxic industrial fire only poisons the concoction further.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Agent-turned-director Tony Krantz has a penchant for stylization that quickly slides into a velvet-painting cheesiness, which-along with the script's pseudoprofound Philosophy 101 maxims-renders the atmosphere less noirish than ridiculously cartoonish.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Self-aware narcissism has rarely been this unjustified-or insufferable.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Based on a true story that culminated with the expulsion of 3 million Germans from Czechoslovakia, the film leaps through years with a rapidity that negates a good deal of its sweep.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    While it may make the City of Light look beautiful, ultimately, this insufferable indie auteur's navel-gazer is just another faux-kinky vanity project in which its creator's neuroses are placed on an undeserved pedestal.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Flirty bickering is rampant but, courtesy of Heigl's inert performance, there's no heat or humor to the proceedings, just an avalanche of grating big-hair-and-bad-accent New Joisey caricatures.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Something happens here, but it isn't life.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Why anyone would want to spend time with a foursome whose bathetic misery is, like the overly mannered visuals of writer-director Dennis Lee (Fireflies in the Garden), defined by such insufferable quirkiness is anyone's guess.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    The real scam was the filmmakers tricking Rebecca Hall (and a cameoing Amanda Seyfried) into participating in this blunt instrument of an indie.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    The story is ultimately nothing more than a decrepit vehicle for the moldiest of scary-movie clichés: screechy specters, inane character behavior and jump scares that a toddler could anticipate minutes ahead of time.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    That sort of fire-and-brimstone morality dominates this one-note sermon, which pairs its pedantic preaching with the campiness of Vanessa Williams speaking in an absurd French accent and Kim Kardashian as the protagonist’s bitchy fashionista coworker, vainly trying to act.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    It’s a film that’s about as funny and/or scary as a lump of sod.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Director Luc Besson treats his protagonists as likable cartoons yet never provides a single reason to view them as anything less than remorseless, repugnant psychos.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Edited to ribbons so that every peripheral player — Kate Bosworth, Radha Mitchell, Josh Lucas, Henry Thomas — is even more one-dimensional than Kerouac himself, it’s a work that accurately expresses the awfulness of narcissistic self-destruction, and nothing else.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 12 Nick Schager
    Hardboiled noir play-acting doesn't get more sluggish than in this leaden tale that blurs the line between reality and delusion in a way that's less intriguing than simply confusing.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 0 Nick Schager
    It's a sloppy, tossed-off collection of parodic gags of vampire flicks and gratuitous pop-cultural references (oh, there will be pointless Lady Gaga gags!) that are below bottom-of-the-barrel.