For 736 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 15.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 47
Highest review score: 100 The Past
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
736 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    While its unconventional approach eventually becomes a tad wearisome, Morgen’s film proves a uniquely revealing exploration of the development, and eventual disintegration, of the heart and mind (and spirit) of a musician incapable of finding solace in, or transcendence through, his angst.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Its plotting is often a tad too plodding, but with the charismatic Mortensen exuding understated internal crisis (in a French- and Arabic-speaking role), Oelhoffen's film proves a compelling portrait of individuals striving to cope with, and at least somewhat overcome, cultural dislocation.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Proving that its chosen genre is best when its tropes are treated with a balance of sincere sweetness and wink-wink absurdity, Playing It Cool thrives through sheer liveliness, as well as the chemistry of its perfectly paired stars.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Thorny issues regarding patient-caregiver relationships, cost-vs.-care tensions, and morality-vs.-rules dynamics are handled with a minimum of didacticism by Lilti, whose handheld camerawork provides a measure of immediacy without calling undue attention to itself.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    If you can get on its wacko wavelength, it's a uniquely crazed, compelling midnight-movie whatsit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Though at times too splintered by its various points of interest, Bernardo Ruiz's up-close-and-personal documentary is nonetheless harrowing in its details.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    A Man Called Ove — preaching tolerant togetherness as the key to happiness — earns its sentimentality by striking a delicate balance between barking-mad comedy and syrupy melodrama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    [An] insightfully open-ended inquiry into the role of humor as it relates to unspeakable tragedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film is buoyed by its sharp, witty lead performances, with Spall’s holier-than-thou imperiousness clashing suitably with Meaney’s more affable obstinacy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Rogen’s zonked-to-insanity performance is the lifeblood of The Night Before, giving it the sort of joyous, madcap energy that comes from letting loose with one’s closest comrades, even to the point of potential oblivion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    It’s a singularly off-kilter vision of repurposed invention, though even at 72 minutes, the film struggles to keep itself afloat, its central conceit too slender to maintain its sense of mirth or wonder.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Yadav pinpoints the various ways in which institutional and personal prejudices keep people enslaved, crafting a sharp portrait of gender inequality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Cuban-American writer-director Julio Quintana’s feature debut has an understated formal loveliness that helps offset its more heavy-handed allegorical inclinations.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    "Southwest of Salem” proves a portrait of individual tragedy, and an indictment of a system willing to let prejudice cloud its judgment — and, also, to avoid admitting its own wrongdoing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    While thrills are mitigated by convoluted plotting and suspect character behavior, the film’s uniquely bleak twist on classic noir conventions is enlivening.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Taking the macro view, [Fulton and Pepe] seem to miss out on the types of thorny micro details — about McGee’s relationship with his mother, or about Viland’s own history preceding her tenure at Black Rock — that would have provided additional complexity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    If the doc’s ultimate argument is less than wholly persuasive, A Good American nonetheless paints a fascinating picture of Binney’s mind, and the way in which he first envisioned ThinThread as a giant neural network-like globe filled with graphically linked nodes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Despite its familiarity, Chapter & Verse manages to make its material both fresh and authentic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    House of Z captures the way in which direct hands-on engagement is vital to an artist’s continued relevance, and vitality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Though the film’s feel-good construction undercuts its ability to surprise, Petra Volpe’s cine-history lesson remains a mainstream crowd-pleaser adept at inspiring and amusing in equal measure.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    It’s mostly interested in the off-kilter but natural chemistry of its leads, who despite their differences come across as comrades who genuinely care about each other, and whose bond is solidified by their shared hangups.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Often too clunky for its own good, and (ahem) doggedly apolitical throughout, this earnest feel-good tale nonetheless manages to pull on the heartstrings with sufficient gentleness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film strikes a fine balance between hilarity and heartbreak.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Prospects are dim no matter where these people choose to reside, and A River Changes Course captures their struggle with an ethnographic gaze that generally maintains enough detachment to avoid excessive, judgmental handwringing and heartstring-tugging.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    An inspired-by-real-events drama that finds honor, decency, and sacrifice in the legal profession, The Attorney is a rousing old-Hollywood tale of one man risking everything for a just cause.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Opting to leave somewhat open the question of whether its subject was a traitor to her Jewish people or a conscientious scholar determined to conduct rational analysis free of public and peer pressure, it remains a mildly intriguing drama of the often unavoidable and contentious intersection of intellectual analysis and personal prejudices.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Lian Lunson’s camera allows the music to take center stage via straightforward, graceful compositions—close-ups and medium shots dominate, and edits are kept to a relative minimum—that allow for long, unbroken views of the artists at forceful, mournful work.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    It’s a stagy setup whose theatrical roots are always front and center, yet it’s one that’s handled with aplomb by director Volker Schlöndorff (The Tin Drum), whose latest has enough visual panache to compensate for the static, conversational nature of the work.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    Not particularly complicated, and sometimes as confused as it is concise, 1972’s Joe Kidd is nonetheless a lean, reasonably satisfying slice of Clint Eastwood outlaw badassery.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Schager
    An old-fashioned tale of heroism in the face of insurmountable odds, The Finest Hours is never less than aggressively hokey and manipulatively sentimental — and, in the end, better off for it.

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