For 1,319 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Noel Murray's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Homicide
Lowest review score: 0 Is That a Gun in Your Pocket?
Score distribution:
1319 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Noel Murray
    Kopple and her team have combed through the hours and hours of those dispatches that Gigi has sent into the world, and from them they’ve pieced together a story very much worth telling.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Noel Murray
    At it’s best, Newness is about how nothing’s really all that new.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Noel Murray
    Rosefeldt’s visual panache and Blanchett’s astonishing versatility bring cinematic verve to something that could’ve easily come off as too dryly conceptual.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Noel Murray
    Only a filmmaker as talented as Alex Ross Perry could make a movie as misbegotten as Golden Exits.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Noel Murray
    Both of Kelly’s movies so far have shown the same strengths and weaknesses. He has an emotionally distant, observational approach, which makes the most outlandish behavior seem grounded and plausible, but which also makes moments of passion and confrontation come off a little flat.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Noel Murray
    This Wilson is sweet and pleasant and occasionally riotously funny. But it’s still the simplified version of a much more complicated work of art.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Noel Murray
    Sheridan pares his story and characters down to their barest essentials, making a movie that comes off sometimes as slight, but which ultimately delivers the goods for those who like smart takes on life-or-death macho adventure.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Noel Murray
    Even if The Little Hours never becomes a knee-slapper, it’s consistently entertaining…kind of like a laid-back, stretched-out Monty Python sketch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Noel Murray
    Unlike “Obvious Child,” Landline plays like a series of semi-successful comic and dramatic scenes, haphazardly arranged into something resembling a story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Noel Murray
    [Morgan's] observations about Hollywood’s image-consciousness and the transactional nature of L.A. relationships are nothing new. But there’s a specificity and a liveliness to her jokes that makes them feel almost fresh — or, at the least, relevant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Noel Murray
    A Ghost Story has the structure and rhythm of a musical suite, with Lowry working variations on the same themes, the same characters, and the same location. The result can be lyrical and poetic, or more naturalistic and minimalist. In both cases, A Ghost Story is absolutely mesmerizing, with an anything-goes quality that’s endlessly fascinating.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Noel Murray
    There’s a certain flat indie artlessness to “The Big Sick,” but it’d be shortsighted to discount how well-written and well-acted it is. This is a very funny movie, yet always plausibly so—never throwing in jokes just for the sake of a laugh.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    The Axe Murders of Villisca never really comes to much, perhaps because its focus is too diffuse. The scares are low, and the plot under-baked.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Noel Murray
    What distinguishes Starless Dreams is Oskouei’s voice, heard from off screen, getting these girls to be honest about where they’ve come from and why they’re less than anxious to return.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    Writer-director C.A. Cooper’s The Snare is admirably artful and oblique in putting its own twist on the haunted-house story, but it’s derivative of much better psychological suspense films and is obnoxiously unpleasant to boot.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    It’s not great. It’s not terrible. It’s really not anything.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Until the thought-provoking, from-left-field twist ending, We Are the Flesh mostly seems like a series of sick tableaux, dredged up from the director’s subconscious and then splattered across the screen. But there’s genuine artistry even to this film’s most exploitative moments.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    Director/co-writer Glenn Douglas Packard tries to bring a little style and color to the film by relying on off-kilter camera angles and cartoonish supporting characters. But he mostly stays within the narrow parameters of the “knocking off generically attractive youngsters one-by-one” movie, never getting campy enough, bizarre enough or satirical enough.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    The Autopsy of Jane Doe is sometimes too low-key, favoring spooky atmosphere and slow-drip storytelling over visceral kicks. But as an acting showcase, the film’s a winner, getting plenty of juice from the performances of two reliable pros.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Noel Murray
    The craft of the film is undeniable. The artistry is subtler and perhaps harder to perceive. But it’s there, lurking in the dark, waiting to rise up when least expected.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    While City of Dead Men has an appealingly polished look and uses its unusual locations thoughtfully, it teeters on the edge of pretension.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    The plot of Solace is ultimately too generic — and too silly — to take seriously, which is probably why the film’s taken so long to come out. But it has style, and throwback appeal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Noel Murray
    Directors Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe (best-known for their Terry Gilliam behind-the-scenes docs Lost In La Mancha and The Hamster Factor) have made The Bad Kids in the “fly on the wall” mold of Frederick Wiseman, crossed with the “year-in-the-life” storytelling of Hoop Dreams. The structure of Black Rock itself is one of their biggest narrative assets.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    It’s hard to recommend Blood Brothers, which is mostly unpleasant and shrill. But it is unusual enough to suggest that Prendes’ next film might be better.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    Ultimately, this film has a memorable villain and a stunning location, and not much else.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Beyond the Gates is more imaginative than frightening, and Stewart and co-writer Stephen Scarlata take too long to get to the good parts, killing time with long dialogue scenes where the characters pause interminably between lines.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Noel Murray
    While the subject matter is difficult, the documentary itself is easy to watch and exciting to grapple with. Its biggest strengths are Jackson’s voice and Baldwin’s commentary, which combine to create a distinctively world-weary tone.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    Dense with plot and mythology, the film is refreshingly unpredictable — if only because guessing what comes next would require understanding what the hell is going on.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    For the most part this is a clever and confident expansion of a terrific short. It stings less but packs plenty of poison.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Noel Murray
    The emotional reserve of 66 Days can make the film feel a little dry at times, given that it’s about something as visceral as a man starving himself to death. But Byrne does a fine job of juggling a lot of information.

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