Oliver Lyttelton

Select another critic »
For 128 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Oliver Lyttelton's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Wadjda
Lowest review score: 0 Grace of Monaco
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 83 out of 128
  2. Negative: 13 out of 128
128 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Oliver Lyttelton
    While it’s an awkward, uneven picture, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t a fascinating one.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Oliver Lyttelton
    Queen & Country is hardly reinventing the wheel, but it's charming, evocative and (mostly) well-performed, and were Boorman to continue with his autobiographical cycle, we'd certainly welcome further installments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Oliver Lyttelton
    It's an ambitious attempt to meld the kind of social realism that made the names of Andrea Arnold and Clio Barnard with a stripped-down genre thriller, an attempt that's only moderately successful, though it suggests Wolfe is a filmmaker of real promise.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Oliver Lyttelton
    Without patronizing or condescending, it’s an examination of how fame can change us and haunt us, and of the complicated relationships that survivors of something like “Star Wars” can have with it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It won't linger in the mind longer than it takes for the credits to roll, but it's a lot of fun while it lasts, and we're genuinely looking forward to part 2 at this point.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It is overlong, and familiar, and never quite hits top gear -- it's never especially bad, but neither is it especially excellent, beyond the visual wow factor. But there's still a lot to admire in the film, not least that it's engaging from the first moment to the last.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    A smart, well-acted and well-directed picture that adds up to a little more than the sum of its parts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    A sly dark comedy that doubles as a very impressive display of wordless storytelling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    Coppola's screenplay neatly restructures Franco's source material into a deceptively tight narrative, and mostly proves to be raw, authentic and often very funny.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    There’s much to like, from Waltz’s performance to the typically rich production and costume design.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    For all its flaws, the film offers as compelling and fair a summary of the case and the man for those less well-versed in the tale as you could ask for from a documentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It’s a strong and eye-catching debut, but one that doesn’t quite mark its ground as the next big thing in Israeli cinema.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    There are enough rough edges and interesting kinks across the two-hour running time that you come out forgiving it for the more generic elements, though we'll acknowledge that the flaws might stick out more on a second viewing, when you're not just pleasantly surprised that the whole thing isn't a stinking mess.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    The Winter Soldier is probably in the upper tier of Marvel pictures in terms of quality, but ultimately proves too muddled and frantic to match the heights of "The Avengers."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    After meandering for a while, the story kicks into gear in the third act, with a couple of legitimately shocking and well-executed developments that do pack a punch missing elsewhere in the film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    Though there's an admirable sense of messiness to the scenes of family life, the screenplay itself is rather neat: one has a fairly solid sense of how things are going to play out from the early stages, and for the most part that's how it goes, ticking off a checklist of rather familiar beats along the way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    The film’s well-written, beautifully performed (not least from Huppert, who’s typically stunning as her icy, grief-stricken matriarch, and the moving Servillo, of “Il Divo” and “Gomorrah” fame), and nicely made, if a good 15 minutes overlong.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It is very much a first film, albeit one of rare ambition, and there's every reason to think that Benson will nail it next time around. The film's absolutely worth watching for the performances alone... But in and of itself, the "Them" version of The Disappearance Of Eleanor Rigby doesn't quite add up to the sum of its parts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It’s a reminder of what a tremendously talented writer and director Kiyoshi Kurosawa is, and hopefully we’ll see him venturing back to the big screen sooner rather than later.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    It's a stinker of an ending tacked on to a disappointing third act (which is at least lifted up by Bartlett's performance), and it's a shame because so much of what went on before was so good: a tender, unsentimental, unexploitative look at an existence that all too many people have, and what it is to be someone who looks after them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    Every time the picture opens a fascinating door, you're held back from going through by a naff filmmaking choice or a rote story move.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    The tale of Choi and Shin is a true stranger-than-fiction one, as good a piece of material as a filmmaker could help for. It’s just a shame that, for the most part, The Lovers And The Despot feels like it’s giving you the Cliff Notes version of the story.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Oliver Lyttelton
    At its best, the film becomes something winningly subversive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    The film contains some memorable moments, and a pair of fine performances, but it’s hard not to feel that it would have proved more successful if it had stayed on the path it was heading down for the first forty minutes or so.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    Star Trek Into Darkness is a long, long way from a disaster, but it's hard not to feel that Abrams' mystery box turned out to be a bit empty this time out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    While there's a lot of fun to be had, Furious 6 doesn't quite hit the insane heights of "Fast Five," but we're sure it'll delight franchise fans who mostly want to see bald people butt heads, and moving vehicles crash into other moving vehicles.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    The film can be engaging, well-made, and even a touch more interesting than it has much right to be. But it's also far from a satisfying work as a whole.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    The 90-minute film feels shallow and, while Rosi has a good eye, not especially cinematic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    The tension really is beautifully ramped up in these early scenes and gets an audience well prepped to watch carnage unfold around people you've truly come to care about. Then, when the thing goes off, it's not with a bang but with something more like a a whimper.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Oliver Lyttelton
    Zhangke's always had a throughline regarding economic inequality and the 21st century-style Chinese capitalism in his work, but Mountains May Depart might be the director's defining statement on the way that his nation has changed over the past few decades. If only he were a touch subtler about it.

Top Trailers