Owen Gleiberman

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For 2,482 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Pete Seeger: The Power of Song
Lowest review score: 0 An Everlasting Piece
Score distribution:
2482 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Paterson, Jarmusch’s wee dramatic curio starring Adam Driver as a New Jersey bus driver – his name is Paterson, and he lives in Paterson — is a movie that’s all too aware of how much it diverges from contemporary tempo. That’s because the entire film is a self-conscious anachronism.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Maddin chops it up into a feature-length antique-bloodsucker video, and the result takes hold neither as dance nor as silent horror dream.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    20th Century Women is an endless chain of anecdotes, and though many individual moments are winning, the movie as a whole is rudderless. It never achieves an emotional power surge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It is also glib, shallow, and monotonous, a movie that spends so much time sanctifying its hero that, despite his "innocence," he ends up seeming about as vulnerable as Superman.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If random arty blood thrills are your cup of fear, perhaps you'll enjoy Let the Right One In, a Swedish head-scratcher that has a few creepy images but very little holding them together.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Regrettably, the film's story is so busy yet flat that the effect isn't magical -- it's more like watching the tale of some very enchanted wallpaper.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If you're going to get on the wavelength of Little Miss Sunshine, you've got to be able to enjoy a comedy in which the characters fit into hermetically cute, predetermined sitcom slots.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The Peoples Temple congregation was sizably African-American. But when it comes to how those followers turned into a zombie Kool-Aid death cult, Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple leaves you with more questions than you went in with.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The stab at sublimity-by-proxy doesn't take.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Fences has passages of fierce and moving power, but on screen the play comes off as episodic and more than a bit unwieldy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    You'd have to be a stone not to be affected by My Flesh and Blood, but the director, Jonathan Karsh, merges compassion with voyeurism until you can't tell the difference.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Designed to be "inspirational," yet it shortchanges the complex reality of the lives it makes such a show of saving.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee Marvin, it must be said, is terrific as the platoon commander, and Fuller deserves props for the film's one sustained sequence: the D-Day attack, in which the platoon gets pinned on the beach for a hellish eternity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Instead of a full-bodied comic portrait of the coming-out-party set, Metropolitan offers a thin, cartoon version. Then it uses that cartoonishness to make everyone on-screen seem irresistibly cute.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    An unabashed descendant of "Bring Me the Head." This time, though, it's an entire corpse that gets hauled through the desert, and that's not all that's being toted. So is a hefty parcel of racial correctness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie takes the form of a lackluster women's-prison picture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Unfortunately, most of the two-hour documentary is devoted to annotating what the Nazis stole for both their state and personal collections. The movie doesn't dramatize this crime -- it catalogs it. With deadening monotony.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    To see this much austere vérité atmosphere propping up this much schlock romanticism is like biting into a blue-cheese canapé that turns out to be a fluffernutter.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    For two and a half hours, Edel lays out the bombings, kidnappings, and murders committed by the Baader-Meinhof group, which mutated into the RAF. He catches the violently delusional self-righteousness of their antifascist fervor, but as individuals these cultish guerrillas remain opaque.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is so self-conscious it seems to be dictating your every reaction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    It sounds churlish to argue that a movie can have too much integrity for its own good, but that's exactly the problem with La Ciénaga.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a tease of a satire that never really follows through on its audacious premise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Glazed over by its worship of Che Guevara.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    More noteworthy for its intentions than its execution.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    As a fantasy, Orlando has been spun out of a rather glib idea: that the mere assertion of Androgyny As Destiny is automatically a brave, emotionally triumphant stance for our time. The truth is, when androgyny is shrouded in this much deadening ”art,” it becomes little more than a haughty exercise in academic chic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    At once spectacular and inert -- a mosaic impersonating a movie; an empty-shell epic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If Take My Eyes explored how a woman could still feel for a man who abused her, it might have gripped us with its difficult truths. But the movie presents Pilar and Antonio's marriage as a stale, neurotic dead end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie in which the easy socio-racial paradoxes have been diagrammed with more care than the relationships
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film has the same moral design as "Dead Man Walking," but since it never gets inside the darkness of the killers' minds, it's really just a rambling episode of "A Current Affair."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In A Scanner Darkly, we're watching other people freak out, but the film is maddening to sit through because their freak-outs never become ours.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The animation in Lilo & Stitch has an engaging retro-simple vivacity, and it's nice to see a movie for tots make use of Elvis Presley, but the story is witless and oddly defanged.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Cotillard, with stringy long hair and a coal fire of severity in her eyes, has what it takes to play a woman who feels that she's lost everything. But she's forced to flail and mood-swing from scene to scene. In an insult to the disabled, there is never much to her but her hellacious injury.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Pictorial but oddly muffled three-hour saga of romance and capitalism, not necessarily in that order.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Catherine Breillat, the French director of "Fat Girl", blends victim feminism with the threat of slasher violence in this arid ''deconstruction'' of Bluebeard, the wife killer of legend.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's not enough for the film to show us a child's corpse wrapped in cardboard; we've got to step back to see Kiarostami himself shooting the sad sight, so that it becomes a Godardian ironic statement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Owen Gleiberman
    My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea feels like a first draft, the one that needed to be written before the second draft added flesh and blood.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    One of those terminally annoying, depressive-yet-coy Sundance faves in which the tale of a mopey teen misfit unfolds behind a hard candy shell of irony.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Sweet, flaky, and more than a little aimless.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Tony Leung plays Ip Man with his old-movie charisma and reserve, but the film, despite a few splendid fights, is a biohistorical muddle that never finds its center. Maybe that's because — big mistake! — it never gets to Bruce Lee.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Les Liaisons Dangereuses is such an elaborate and satisfying structure of deceit and salaciousness that every attempt I have seen to adapt it on film -- "Dangerous Liaisons," "Cruel Intentions," even the trashy 1959 Roger Vadim version -- has resulted in an entertainment of agreeable nasty elegance. Until now.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    A thriller that wheezes along on bits and pieces of ''character.''
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is so busy turning the Sioux characters into photogenic saints that it never quite allows them the complications of human beings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is so prefab, so plastically aware of being ''corny,'' ''romantic,'' and ''old-fashioned,'' that it feels programmed to make you fall in love with it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Inland Empire is so locked up in David Lynch's brain that it never burrows its way into ours.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    12
    Has none of the crisp passion or suspense of the 1957 Sidney Lumet version; it's bloated, heavy-handed, and lugubrious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In Land of the Dead there are virtually no good parts. The movie is listless and uninspired.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's too bad that the film was directed by the Norwegian minimalist Bent Hamer (Kitchen Stories), who makes a fetish of building scenes around silence.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee's performance is by far the best thing about The Crow. Unfortunately, he's just good enough to make you wish that the movie had had a whisper of storytelling invention to go along with its showy visual design.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Skillfully made, yet the film would have been better if it had tapped a bit of that Walken madness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Elegant yet surprisingly remote royal-court drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Little Man Tate keeps introducing characters and narrative lines that seem promising, but it doesn’t sustain them. The movie feels like three Afterschool Specials welded together.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The aliens aren't particularly scary or funny, and so the joke of watching Smith and Jones crack wise in their faces wears thin.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    As it moves from the drizzly to the overly stormy, Rain freights a young girl's self-destructive eagerness to lose her virginity with so much danger and even horror that it's as if the events were trying to make up for the film's previous lack of drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The events may be accurate, but Mesrine is so episodic that it's slightly maddening to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    This makes for a friendly romp, and also a dull one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, despite enthralling moments, is so self-intoxicated by its blissed-out vision of global healing that it’s a little soft.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Little more than a plodding celebration of global television trumping everything in its midst.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Trying for a dark-toned comedy of familial mishap, Keaton dips into the sentimental fraudulence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The House of Sand's director, Andrucha Waddington, lays on the Awesome Visual Poetry and throws in a welter of story gimmicks, but it's all a bit too fancifully arid.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Traffics in the coyly blasphemous, aren't-we-dysfunctional family-disaster chic that has become the single most annoying trend in independent filmmaking.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Nothing in the two snail-paced hours of Pulse makes close to a shred of sense?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The quaint racial blinders are really on the eyes of the filmmaker, Peter Hedges, who shoves his characters into the narrowest of sitcom slots and seals them there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Pucci proves to be one of the most charismatic male ingenues since Johnny Depp.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee's images of black and white stereotypes are agreeably silly yet altogether too thin and vanilla safe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Director Gaspar Noé proved a shock poet in "Irreversible" (2003). In Enter the Void, he's a shockingly tedious show-off.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    There's no denying that Washington can play a rococo villain with flip ebullience, but I fervently wish he were doing it in a movie that paid more than lip service to the real world.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The Farrellys may well be the new kingpins of adolescent slob comedy, but There's Something About Mary doesn't approach the witty anarchy of movies like "Animal House," "The Naked Gun," or "Hairspray."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It's all way too heavy-handed, though nicely acted by Hirsch, Culkin, and, especially, Jena Malone.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Too chicly depressive -- and, for the most part, too dull -- to bear.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The Go-Getter travels, but it doesn't go anywhere.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Overheated yet bizarrely opaque criminal character study from Belgium.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    There's a certain breed of annoying indie movie in which a character's shyness is portrayed in a manner so coy that it becomes a reverse form of exhibitionism. Jump Tomorrow is that kind of movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Even a filmmaker as dazzling as Steven Spielberg has to create characters who lure us into their point of view, and the trouble with Tintin is that we're always on the outside, looking in. What all that motion can't capture is our hearts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It's slow and pretentious, full of craggy Bavarian snowscapes and dour "mystical" portents that seem to circle back to nothing but themselves.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Further sad evidence that Tom Tykwer, director of the resonant and sense-spinning ''Run Lola Run,'' has turned out to be a one-trick pony -- a maker of softheaded metaphysical claptrap. It's enough to make you want to see him run again.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It has a few whispers of intrigue, but at the heart of The Bourne Identity lies a dispiriting paradox: The more that Jason Bourne learns about himself, the less arresting he seems.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It longs to be a close-to-the-bone lampoon in the scathing spirit of Christopher Guest, and it has a few amusing moments, but it’s really a predigested one-joke comedy. It’s less an honest satire than an overscaled satirical package.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    There are funny bits in Amy Heckerling's high school sat-ire, but the characters are teen-movie zombies with no discernible personality apart from their trendoid obsessions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It would be nice to see a sharp, funny, penetrating satire of the new, kicked-up culture of empty media fame, but Tom DiCillo's scattershot buddy movie Delirious isn't it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The director's famously over-deliberate, pause-laden style verges, for the first time, on amateurville, and that gives us too much time to linger on the movie's more bizarre details.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Starts out well, but it turns into an almost perversely undramatic legal thriller.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Voyage of Time has too many spellbinding images to count, but as a movie it’s just okay.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Feels cramped and underimagined. I think Judge is capable of making an inspired live-action comedy, but next time he'll have to remember to do what he does in his animated ones--keep the madness popping.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Offers tricky fragmentation without mystery or mood; it's a mosaic of fear that grows less and less unsettling as it comes together.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    XXY
    It's set at a beach house, but we see only gray skies, and though Efron has a wary and cutting intelligence (it matches that of the fine actor Ricardo Darin, who plays her father), the effect is tepid and damp.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Benoît Jacquot's film is shackled to a blah bourgeois leftism.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    From its jokey, one-note characters to its endless baseball montages, A League of Their Own is all flash, all surface.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Trust, the cult-movie view turns precious and smug.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's all very sub-Tarantino showy and empty - at least, until the head-scratching climax, which tries to be "Eyes Wide Shut," "The Wicker Man," and "The Twilight Zone" all at once, but only makes you wish that you were watching one of them instead.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The British director Ken Loach can be a master of working-class realism, but not in this cranky, rudderless shambles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s not necessary, of course, for The Phenom to be an all-out sports drama, but writer-director Noah Buschel sets up the rare opportunity to explore what makes a jock tick, then doesn’t follow through.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Andy Garcia reminds you of what a cunning, likable actor he can be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Fourteen years after "Happiness," why is director Todd Solondz still mucking around with the sort of idiot neurotic dweeb who makes George Costanza look like George Clooney?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Blood Father is trash, but it does capture what an accomplished and winning actor Mel Gibson can be. Just because he lost his bearings, and his career, doesn’t mean that he lost his talent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Turns out to be the portrait of a serial yo-yo dieter, an impression enhanced by the 60 year old Berlin, who suggests less a former depraved scenester than a calorie compulsive Martha Stewart grown bored with good taste.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The best thing in the movie is Arterton's sultry, claw-baring turn, but mostly it's a rudderless riff on "Let the Right One In."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    For a while, the atmosphere seems just right. As Mrs. Parker goes on, it becomes apparent that the one-liners, droll as some of them are, aren't really going to coalesce into characters, scenes, dramatic encounters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Soderbergh, in essence, has come up with a plodding and far less psychologically arresting version of ''Ghost.''
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Owen Gleiberman
    The technical bravura that Guiraudie summoned in “Stranger” — the subtle manipulation of light, weather, shot language, and temporal cunning — now falls by the wayside in a story that lurches from episode to disconnected episode.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The Limits of Control, even with its flow of star cameos (Tilda Swinton, Gael García Bernal, a frenetic Bill Murray), is a listless long pause that rarely refreshes.

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