Owen Gleiberman
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For 2,346 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Century of the Self
Lowest review score: 0 Even Cowgirls Get the Blues
Score distribution:
2,346 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As long as it showcases the art of krump, underscoring the dancers with ominous hip-hop beats, Rize is such a vibrant eruption of motion and attitude that you can forgive the film for being disorganized and too skimpy on street-dance history.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The film can be rambling and glib, yet it's no mere crime drama. It captures a middle-class French society that looks more humane than ours, but is just as messed up.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The gimmicks, in the end, are too arbitrary to tie together in a memorably haunting fashion, though they do culminate in a Big Twist, a nifty one that almost -- but not quite -- makes you want to see the movie again.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As the jabbering psychotic Jeffrey Goines, Brad Pitt has a rabid, get-a-load-of-me deviousness that works for the film's central mystery: We can't tell where the fanatic leaves off and the put-on artist begins.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Flushed Away lacks the action-contraption dottiness of a Wallace and Gromit adventure, but it hits its own sweet spot of demented delight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    And so even if you're held (as I was) by the acting, you may find yourself fighting the film's design. It reflects a certain lack of faith in your audience to take a performance as authentic as De Niro's and reduce it to the level of a glorified reach-out-and-touch-someone commercial.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A delicate yet haunting movie, a meditation on friendship, on the roots of bohemianism, on the sad comedy of madness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a scrumptious and dizzy-spirited lark, a what-the-hell-let's-rob-the-casino flick made with so much wit and brains and dazzle and virtuosity that the sheer speed and cleverness of the caper hits you like a shot of pure oxygen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A documentary that digs deep inside this most revolutionary and tortured of punk quartets, it's hard not to feel that the Ramones, who never had a hit record, were the greatest band in 50 years to be stonewalled out of success.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It evokes the spirit of Hitchcock and Highsmith.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As long as the MPAA is issuing its cavalier decrees, though, they're the ones acting like bullies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    At once spectacular and inert -- a mosaic impersonating a movie; an empty-shell epic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In execution, it is charming...and also a little monotonous.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Munich, Steven Spielberg's spectacularly gripping and unsettling new movie, is a grave and haunted film, yet its power lies in its willingness to be a work of brutal excitement.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If Take My Eyes explored how a woman could still feel for a man who abused her, it might have gripped us with its difficult truths. But the movie presents Pilar and Antonio's marriage as a stale, neurotic dead end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Titanic floods you with elemental passion in a way that invites comparison with the original movie spectacles of D.W. Griffith.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie in which the easy socio-racial paradoxes have been diagrammed with more care than the relationships
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    With all of that going for it, it's hard to see how In the Line of Fire could be anything less than rock-solid entertainment-and, indeed, it is. Yet it's never more than that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Higher Ground breaks crucial, sacred ground in American moviemaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Frozen is a squarely enchanting fairy tale that shows you how the definition of what's fresh in animation can shift.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Stonewall Uprising does an evocative job of coloring in the oppression of gay life before Stonewall, so that when the eruption happens, we feel its necessity in our bones.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Cyrus cues us to expect it to go over the top, but the film never does. That may be its neatest trick
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Nothing more than a modest, streamlined ''making of...'' diary about a movie that never got made -- it's ''Project Greenlight'' with bigger stars and bigger disasters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    A singular and haunting experience.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Director Ole Christian Madsen combines sharp scenes of moral inquiry with a few too many functional, oldfangled espionage twists.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film has the same moral design as "Dead Man Walking," but since it never gets inside the darkness of the killers' minds, it's really just a rambling episode of "A Current Affair."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Washington immerses himself, even more than he did in "Malcolm X," in a stare of unforgiving outrage.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Even as the director, Stephen Daldry, places his star front and center, he doesn't know how to highlight him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Rouses you in conventional ways, but it's also the rare animated film that uses 3-D for its breathtaking spatial and emotional possibilities.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    How is Invictus as a sports movie? Let's just say that its lump-in-the-throat climax is predictable, but that doesn't mean it's less than earned.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A highbrow chick flick that made me feel older, in a good way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    James Gray's Two Lovers really is a '70s movie, in the mode of such raw, unfiltered character studies as "The Panic in Needle Park," "Wanda," and "Fat City."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The thriller that's exciting, cathartic, and powerfully disturbing. Prisoners is that type of movie. It's rooted in 40 years of Hollywood revenge films, yet it also breaks audacious new ground.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Though the events have a rambling overfamiliarity, there's a real story between the lines: the resentment over the U.S. occupation on the part of non-insurgent Iraqis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    One of the most revelatory rock portraits ever made.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Now Ray has directed his second film, the abysmally titled Breach, and it's a bona fide companion piece, another true-life tale of duplicity gone secretly insane.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A swankily austere piece of jeepers-creepers sci-fi.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    If the result is often as glib as the targets it's satirizing, it's also driven by a cruelly distilled joy. Wag the Dog is an ode to the thrill of deception, a thrill embodied in Hoffman's inspired performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Mysterious Skin dawdles more than it flows, but it comes alive whenever Araki, hovering between tragedy and voyeurism, reveals how sex can tear lives to pieces.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The beauty of Into the Wild, which Penn has written and directed with magnificent precision and imaginative grace, is that what Christopher is running from is never as important as what he's running TO.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In A Scanner Darkly, we're watching other people freak out, but the film is maddening to sit through because their freak-outs never become ours.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Ghost Protocol brims with scenes that are exciting and amazing at the same time; they're brought off with such casual aplomb that they're funny, too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The animation in Lilo & Stitch has an engaging retro-simple vivacity, and it's nice to see a movie for tots make use of Elvis Presley, but the story is witless and oddly defanged.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Cotillard, with stringy long hair and a coal fire of severity in her eyes, has what it takes to play a woman who feels that she's lost everything. But she's forced to flail and mood-swing from scene to scene. In an insult to the disabled, there is never much to her but her hellacious injury.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    I'm Not There lets you hear it again, more majestically than ever.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Isn't content to stick to the genre conventions it sets up. Instead, it sprawls and mutates into one of the Coens' elaborate gizmoid yarns.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A conventionally heightened series of escapes and clashes and hide-and-seek gambits, yet the way the film has been made, nothing that happens seems inevitable -- which is to say, anything seems possible. There's a word for that sensation. It's called excitement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The film doesn't turn its issues into a glorified essay, but it does use them to give the audience a vital emotional workout.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Catherine Breillat, the French director of "Fat Girl", blends victim feminism with the threat of slasher violence in this arid ''deconstruction'' of Bluebeard, the wife killer of legend.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's not enough for the film to show us a child's corpse wrapped in cardboard; we've got to step back to see Kiarostami himself shooting the sad sight, so that it becomes a Godardian ironic statement.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I do wish that Evans were a better storyteller. When he isn't turning mad-dog violence into visual rock & roll, The Raid shreds narrative coherence to ribbons.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A lot of thrillers have asked us to identify with assassins -- but I'd be hard-pressed to name one that makes a hitman as sympathetic, if not sentimental, as The Memory of a Killer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A deliciously amusing socio-culinary prank.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Minghella's adaptation of the 1997 Charles Frazier novel is emotionally detached and almost too studiously carpentered: a willed exercise in mythmaking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Light and goofy, yet the fight scenes, which are the heart of the film, are lickety-split mad fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Has so little fire that Welles himself would have wondered out loud what he was doing stuck in the middle of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's argument against overly literal Bible readings may not preach to anyone but the converted, and when For the Bible Tells Me So strays from scripture, its ardent plea for sexual freedom within modern Christian life grows a bit too late-night PBS generic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    One of those terminally annoying, depressive-yet-coy Sundance faves in which the tale of a mopey teen misfit unfolds behind a hard candy shell of irony.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Pictorial but oddly muffled three-hour saga of romance and capitalism, not necessarily in that order.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Sweet, flaky, and more than a little aimless.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    You know you're in the hands of a born filmmaker when he floods a scene with danger and excitement and, at the same time, tempers it with something more delicate -- a languor of the everyday.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The finest rock doc since "Anvil: The Story of Anvil." Matt Berninger, lead singer of the National, is a 40ish indie-rock star who carries himself like a hip lawyer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Les Liaisons Dangereuses is such an elaborate and satisfying structure of deceit and salaciousness that every attempt I have seen to adapt it on film -- "Dangerous Liaisons," "Cruel Intentions," even the trashy 1959 Roger Vadim version -- has resulted in an entertainment of agreeable nasty elegance. Until now.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    It takes skill these days, if not nerve, to put a vital, happy nuclear family on screen and to invite us to share in every quiet tremor, every gentle jostle and smile of their steady, deep-flowing contentment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    A thriller that wheezes along on bits and pieces of ''character.''
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Overall it's more amusing than hilarious.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Roberts, in her most forceful dramatic performance, allows us to take in every moment through fresh, impassioned eyes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A canny franchise escapade; it gets the job done. But it also leaves you hungry for something more, and I don't necessarily mean the next episode.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The key to The Company is the quiet, focused rapture of Neve Campbell, who formally trained in ballet and performed all of her on-screen dances. The tranquil delight she takes in her body becomes its own eloquent form of acting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Ray
    As a musical biography, Ray is driven by the primal excitement of rock-and-soul at the moment of its discovery.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Fast, convulsive, and densely exciting new British gangster thriller.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie also captures Thompson's tragedy: the haze of drugs and bad writing that consumed him for no less than his last 30 years.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is watchable but also stiff and remote.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Buoyantly clever and amusing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Presents Glass as a masterfully corrupt fabulist who convinced himself of the ultimate seductive lie, which is that there can't be anything wrong with telling people what they want to hear.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    An attack-of-the-aliens disaster film crafted with sinister technological grandeur -- a true popcorn apocalypse.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a poison bonbon tastier than just about anything else out there.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A tangy raw stew of history, even if it never begins to confront the contradictions that bedeviled black militancy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Tony Leung plays Ip Man with his old-movie charisma and reserve, but the film, despite a few splendid fights, is a biohistorical muddle that never finds its center. Maybe that's because — big mistake! — it never gets to Bruce Lee.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Go
    The one truly thrilling movie I've seen so far this year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Gripping in its intimacy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, for all its sincerity, becomes clinical and repetitious, though its unsparing vision of the fragility of identity can give you a shudder.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is Mike's story, and Channing Tatum proves himself a true movie star. His Mike glides through the world with the ease of a god, and on stage he's electrifying.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    This makes for a modestly touching journey, but New York Doll, in its wafer-thin way, is an oxymoron: a hagiographic tribute to a rocker with more passion than talent.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Those Oompa-Loompas are the beat, and soul, of Burton's finest movie since "Ed Wood": a madhouse kiddie musical with a sweet-and-sour heart.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Watching this film, one is left with the inescapable conclusion that Hitchens' obsession with Kissinger is, at bottom, a sophisticated flower child's desire to purge the world of the tooth and claw of human power. The movie isn't, finally, an argument. It's a long angry ''Boo!''
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The funniest moments in Groundhog Day come when Phil takes sneaky advantage of his predicament-by, say, pumping a sexy woman in the local coffee shop for facts about her past and then, ''the next day,'' using the information to lure her into bed. What the movie lacks is the ingenious, lapidary comic structure that could have made these moments fuse into something tricky and wild.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The actress (Scarlett Johansson) gives a nearly silent performance, yet the interplay on her face of fear, ignorance, curiosity, and sex is intensely dramatic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    JFK
    [Stone's] filmmaking is so supple and alive, his obsession with the visual aspect of history so electrifying, that JFK practically roots itself in your imagination.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is a bit too chronological, but its historical reverence is true to gospel's joyful insistence on locating the spiritual in the everyday.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Berlin is far from the lost masterpiece the movie wants it to be.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    God Grew Tired of Us never brings us half as close to its subjects as the far more penetrating "Lost Boys of Sudan" did in 2004.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    3-Iron is like a Raymond Carver story that slowly, inexorably takes on the dimensions of a ghostly fairy tale.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The surprise of Superman Returns is that it isn't a funky, ambitious conceptual reimagining, like last summer's "Batman Begins." This really IS your father's Superman; it re-creates - and updates, though just barely - the universe Donner invented.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is so busy turning the Sioux characters into photogenic saints that it never quite allows them the complications of human beings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Pi
    The movie's freakazoid intensity gets to you, but there's something at once cramped and show-offy in Aronofsky's refusal to even slighty vary its atmosphere of shock-corridor burnout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Rock gives Good Hair a rousing message: Where African-Americans in the '60s adopted a ''natural'' look, they now feel free to coif their heads any way they want. That's cultural power.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Enchantingly witty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is fascinating, though it smacks its own lips a bit too much at the tackiness of freak '70s stardom.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Beneath its exploration of fatherly distance, this is really a portrait of why cranks make better artists than earnest nice guys.