Owen Gleiberman
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For 2,347 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Being John Malkovich
Lowest review score: 0 In the Cut
Score distribution:
2,347 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Directed by Guillermo del Toro with a colorfully kinetic visual imagination that seldom lets up.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is so prefab, so plastically aware of being ''corny,'' ''romantic,'' and ''old-fashioned,'' that it feels programmed to make you fall in love with it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Safety Not Guaranteed is a fable of ''redemption,'' and it's too tidy by half, but it is also very sweetly told.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Into Darkness is a sleek, thrilling epic that's also a triumphantly witty popcorn morality play. It's everything you could want in a Star Trek movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Bellflower is stylishly watchable - even when it's preposterous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Aristocrats has a lot of laughs, but as it giggles and blasphemes its way into areas not so far removed from the scandalous landscape of the Marquis de Sade, the movie, funny as it is, becomes exhausting and a bit depressing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Easy A has some agreeable fast banter, but it's so self-consciously stylized that it wears you out.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Reilly, in his 70s, takes us through his hilariously awful childhood: Eugene O'Neill as toxic high camp.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Inland Empire is so locked up in David Lynch's brain that it never burrows its way into ours.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Worth seeing for Bacon's lived-in minimalist purgatory, but the movie soft-pedals the nature of the desires he's at war with: the fact that they will never go away.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Death and the Maiden doesn't always escape its contraption origins, but it ends with one of the most honest-and poetic- reckonings of human evil in modern movies. It's Polanski braying at his own bitter moon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    When C-Diddy (a.k.a. David Jung), in his samurai superman suit, does his note-perfect, lip-twisting, belly-jiggling manic mime of Extreme's ''Play With Me,'' it's hard not to grin and admit that, yes, this is almost an art form.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A romp of romantic larceny built out of spare parts we've seen in countless other films.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A big, juicy, enjoyable wide-canvas biography with a handful of indelible moments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Antal has assembled what may be the single most colorless group of mangy lowlifes I have ever seen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The dance-film equivalent of a female impersonator: The movie is absurd and sincere at the same time-it offers an insolent facsimile of grand passion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A love poem to the New York City of the '50s and '60s, when Smith, the visionary of camp (Andy Warhol stole from him), more or less invented performance art.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Even from the safety of a movie seat, you can just about feel the stinging hardness of the surf. Blue crush? This is more like white smash.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Kevin Kline is sweetly befuddled as a good man caught between worlds, and Sigourney Weaver, as a hard, sexy adulteress, makes her wit sting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    A terrific, small, funny, sad movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    12
    Has none of the crisp passion or suspense of the 1957 Sidney Lumet version; it's bloated, heavy-handed, and lugubrious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    For a documentary that's almost engineered to lift your heart, Undefeated is very well done.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The hit-and-run outlandishness of "Clerks" was a stunt. With Chasing Amy, Smith has made his first real movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In Land of the Dead there are virtually no good parts. The movie is listless and uninspired.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Depardieu and Marie Bunel (as Bellamy's wife) have a terrific interplay, but Chabrol's sharp direction can't quite rescue his fuzzy script.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This satire of empty-suit capitalism has scalding moments, but most of it suggests Being There meets The Office gibberized into theater of the absurd.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A marvelous movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Greenwald floats the vital issue of whether Wal-Mart should be restrained by antimonopoly regulations, but his real question is cultural: Even with its rock-bottom prices, is Wal-Mart in the best interest of American consumers?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    This modern slice of neorealism has been made with a skill, and humanity, that suggests Bahrani may have a "Bicycle Thief" in him yet.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    It's Alan Cumming who takes over the movie as the impish mastermind Fegan Floop.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's too bad that the film was directed by the Norwegian minimalist Bent Hamer (Kitchen Stories), who makes a fetish of building scenes around silence.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Disciplined script -- bitingly funny.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As a politico, Ed Koch loved power a little too much. But as a leader, he was a storybook embodiment of New York's contradictions, which is why his chapters in the city's saga loom so large.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Mad Dog and Glory turns out to be a light-spirited urban fairy tale. Despite occasional flashes of violence, its atmosphere is one of moonstruck romanticism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    That's Trumbo's message -- that the true victim was America.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The (mild) intrigue of Travellers & Magicians is that its central figure, Dondup (Tshewang Dendup), rolls his eyes at Buddhist karma.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee's performance is by far the best thing about The Crow. Unfortunately, he's just good enough to make you wish that the movie had had a whisper of storytelling invention to go along with its showy visual design.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is a veritable scrapbook of tropes from the heyday of art film. Maybe that's why it feels gauzy and quaint. Yet time passes pleasantly.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The beauty of Swingers lies in the irony of its title: Despite their lounge-lizard posing, these guys will never really live up to their Rat Pack dreams.
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Skillfully made, yet the film would have been better if it had tapped a bit of that Walken madness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It took long enough, but Disney has finally come up with an animated heroine who's a good role model and a funky, arresting personality at the same time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    In Superstar in a Housedress, Curtis remains frozen in his flamboyance. The most resonant parts of the movie are, oddly, the interviews with his fellow glam bohemians.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As the village is destroyed, its people humiliated, hunted down, and murdered, Singleton brings the images and underlying psychological truths of American racial violence to the screen with a brute dramatic force that few directors have matched.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Full of splendidly shot wonders.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    There's a slightness to Postcards From the Edge, and a little too much satirical self-help jargon (the story is all about how Suzanne learns to like herself). But the movie captures — and celebrates — how easy it is to turn your problems into show biz.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Penn is a true talent, but there's just enough languid pretension to The Pledge to make you wonder if he's ultimately more interested in parading his promise as a director than in fulfilling it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    On the eve of Wuornos' 2002 execution, Broomfield digs deep into her abusive hell of a background (beatings, incest, sleeping homeless in the frozen Michigan woods) as well as her quasi-psychotic defense mechanisms.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A sturdily diverting old fashioned heist thriller that looks like a masterpiece of sheer competence next to the slovenly action fantasy F/X grab bags that have been passing for summer entertainment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A testament to the discipline, humor, and life of kids who swing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Fincher has made The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo into an electrifying movie by turning the audience into addicts of the forbidden, looking for the sick and twisted things we can't see.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Forget Devo, Nico, Bowie, or Beefheart: The most mesmerizing freak show in the history of rock & roll was Klaus Nomi.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    You may want to dispute Ruppert, but more than that you'll want to hear him, because what he says -- right or wrong, prophecy or paranoia -- takes up residence in your mind.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    That Thing You Do! is neither overly sentimental nor overly cynical. It looks at the invention of our pop-rock mythology, and the bands that fed it until they were consumed by it, just as you'd expect Tom Hanks to: with open eyes (and a raised eyebrow).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Australian actress Frances O'Connor is a true find. She's as beautiful as the young Barbara Hershey, with a stare that's pensive yet playful, and she puts us in touch with the quiet battle of emotions in Fanny.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Mostly, Warrior is a showcase for its up-and-coming stars. Edgerton, from last year's "Animal Kingdom," and Hardy, who stole scenes as the identity forger in "Inception."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    After a lifetime of flogging the demons of cosmic despair, Ingmar Bergman, at 88, comes off as lean and vigorous in this fascinating memoir-interview.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Lays on the compassion a little thick, yet its heartfelt squalor stays with you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A madcap gem.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Michael Mann's tensely funny and alive Los Angeles night-world thriller, is, in its own twisty way, a very high-stakes buddy movie, yet it doesn't look like one, because it leaps off from a situation more jangled and threatening than we're used to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Just because a scenario turns dark doesn't mean that it's convincing. House of Sand and Fog is artful until it lunges for Art.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A work of staggering intelligence and emotional force -- a mosaic of broken dreams.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Linklater has hardly been a slacker this year. I'll take the tricky confrontational babble of Tape over some of the gauzier soliloquies in ''Waking Life,'' but either way, he's a filmmaker in love with the music of talk, and let's bless him for that.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Elegant yet surprisingly remote royal-court drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The actors all blend terrifically, making this the film equivalent of great hang time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    There's no denying its grip: It is lurid, fascinating, sickening, and eye-opening.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The aliens aren't particularly scary or funny, and so the joke of watching Smith and Jones crack wise in their faces wears thin.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    As it moves from the drizzly to the overly stormy, Rain freights a young girl's self-destructive eagerness to lose her virginity with so much danger and even horror that it's as if the events were trying to make up for the film's previous lack of drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The events may be accurate, but Mesrine is so episodic that it's slightly maddening to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    This makes for a friendly romp, and also a dull one.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A rapturous and enlightening look at the history of the environmental movement in America.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Quills bleaches the danger -- and fascination -- out of De Sade, turning him into a kind of mad saint of ''Masterpiece Theatre'' porn.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Stuffed--indeed, overstuffed--with heart, soul, audacity, and blarney. You may not believe a minute of it, but you don't necessarily want to stop watching.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Horton's attempt to authenticate the painting in the face of a hostile art establishment becomes a study in forensics, taste, money, and class warfare.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Morris, using a welter of photographs (many of which we haven't seen), constructs a day-to-day sense of how Abu Ghraib descended into a medieval hell.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    By far the best Judd Apatow comedy that Judd Apatow had nothing at all to do with.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I kept wondering how Arcand could have chosen as his generational representative a man not just flawed in his hedonism but one so fundamentally lacking in tenderness for others.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Little more than a plodding celebration of global television trumping everything in its midst.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The creators of Captain America: The Winter ­Soldier have brought off something fresh and bold.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Aaron Woolf's we-are-what-we-eat documentary King Corn is a lively introduction to the corn industrial complex.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The writing is zippy, the story spins like a top, and Bardem turns out to be the wittiest of leading men.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Countdown to Zero makes old terrors radioactively new again.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Hoffman plays Dan Mahowny's addiction to instant money as something dirty and private and, at the same time, soul-quickening.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Trying for a dark-toned comedy of familial mishap, Keaton dips into the sentimental fraudulence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There are fine, fresh observational moments, but the film is much ado about not so much.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is an unblinking look at the hidden (or perhaps not so hidden) pathology of American sports mania.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The House of Sand's director, Andrucha Waddington, lays on the Awesome Visual Poetry and throws in a welter of story gimmicks, but it's all a bit too fancifully arid.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A no-frills docu-Dogma plainness, yet Miller lingers on invisible, nearly psychic nuances, leaping into digressions of memory and desire. She boxes these women's souls right open for us.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Gerron's terrible film was never shown in the places it was meant for, but in Prisoner of Paradise it reveals a queasy corner of the Nazi mind that tried to imagine a concentration camp as it fantasized the inmates might have.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's crank-case snappishness doesn't break any molds, but it certainly gives you a lift.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    With an authenticity that is tender and merciless, the movie shows you what it looks like when youth rebellion becomes a form of fascism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's fragmentary structure, though, is suspect. It says that the soldiers find no real meaning in their combat actions, yet Gunner Palace presents the operations we're seeing in so little context, reducing them to a random hash of ''sensational'' moments, that Tucker at times appears to be exploiting the war to create a didactic canvas of manic military unease.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Curse of the Golden Flower is a watchable soap opera, but its marching-band martial-arts scenes are little more than weakly staged retreads of the ones in Zhang's "Hero."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A comedy of the ridiculous in which the ridiculous turns unexpectedly sublime.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Who Killed the Electric Car? makes you angry, and also sad, to live in a country where innovation could be contrived into an enemy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Traffics in the coyly blasphemous, aren't-we-dysfunctional family-disaster chic that has become the single most annoying trend in independent filmmaking.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Potent and eye-opening documentary.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Paradoxically, a movie that loses power the more you perceive what's actually going on in it. Laid end to end, the story is, to put it mildly, overwrought, fusing several cataclysms too many.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Oren Moverman's Rampart is a terrific film: tense, shocking, complex, mesmerizing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Nothing in the two snail-paced hours of Pulse makes close to a shred of sense?