Owen Gleiberman
Select another critic »
For 2,348 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Boogie Nights
Lowest review score: 0 D.E.B.S.
Score distribution:
2,348 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Maddin chops it up into a feature-length antique-bloodsucker video, and the result takes hold neither as dance nor as silent horror dream.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It is also glib, shallow, and monotonous, a movie that spends so much time sanctifying its hero that, despite his "innocence," he ends up seeming about as vulnerable as Superman.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If random arty blood thrills are your cup of fear, perhaps you'll enjoy Let the Right One In, a Swedish head-scratcher that has a few creepy images but very little holding them together.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Regrettably, the film's story is so busy yet flat that the effect isn't magical -- it's more like watching the tale of some very enchanted wallpaper.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If you're going to get on the wavelength of Little Miss Sunshine, you've got to be able to enjoy a comedy in which the characters fit into hermetically cute, predetermined sitcom slots.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The Peoples Temple congregation was sizably African-American. But when it comes to how those followers turned into a zombie Kool-Aid death cult, Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple leaves you with more questions than you went in with.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The stab at sublimity-by-proxy doesn't take.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    You'd have to be a stone not to be affected by My Flesh and Blood, but the director, Jonathan Karsh, merges compassion with voyeurism until you can't tell the difference.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Designed to be "inspirational," yet it shortchanges the complex reality of the lives it makes such a show of saving.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee Marvin, it must be said, is terrific as the platoon commander, and Fuller deserves props for the film's one sustained sequence: the D-Day attack, in which the platoon gets pinned on the beach for a hellish eternity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    An unabashed descendant of "Bring Me the Head." This time, though, it's an entire corpse that gets hauled through the desert, and that's not all that's being toted. So is a hefty parcel of racial correctness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie takes the form of a lackluster women's-prison picture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Unfortunately, most of the two-hour documentary is devoted to annotating what the Nazis stole for both their state and personal collections. The movie doesn't dramatize this crime -- it catalogs it. With deadening monotony.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    To see this much austere vérité atmosphere propping up this much schlock romanticism is like biting into a blue-cheese canapé that turns out to be a fluffernutter.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    For two and a half hours, Edel lays out the bombings, kidnappings, and murders committed by the Baader-Meinhof group, which mutated into the RAF. He catches the violently delusional self-righteousness of their antifascist fervor, but as individuals these cultish guerrillas remain opaque.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is so self-conscious it seems to be dictating your every reaction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    It sounds churlish to argue that a movie can have too much integrity for its own good, but that's exactly the problem with La Ciénaga.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a tease of a satire that never really follows through on its audacious premise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Glazed over by its worship of Che Guevara.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    More noteworthy for its intentions than its execution.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    At once spectacular and inert -- a mosaic impersonating a movie; an empty-shell epic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    If Take My Eyes explored how a woman could still feel for a man who abused her, it might have gripped us with its difficult truths. But the movie presents Pilar and Antonio's marriage as a stale, neurotic dead end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie in which the easy socio-racial paradoxes have been diagrammed with more care than the relationships
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film has the same moral design as "Dead Man Walking," but since it never gets inside the darkness of the killers' minds, it's really just a rambling episode of "A Current Affair."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In A Scanner Darkly, we're watching other people freak out, but the film is maddening to sit through because their freak-outs never become ours.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The animation in Lilo & Stitch has an engaging retro-simple vivacity, and it's nice to see a movie for tots make use of Elvis Presley, but the story is witless and oddly defanged.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Cotillard, with stringy long hair and a coal fire of severity in her eyes, has what it takes to play a woman who feels that she's lost everything. But she's forced to flail and mood-swing from scene to scene. In an insult to the disabled, there is never much to her but her hellacious injury.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Pictorial but oddly muffled three-hour saga of romance and capitalism, not necessarily in that order.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Catherine Breillat, the French director of "Fat Girl", blends victim feminism with the threat of slasher violence in this arid ''deconstruction'' of Bluebeard, the wife killer of legend.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's not enough for the film to show us a child's corpse wrapped in cardboard; we've got to step back to see Kiarostami himself shooting the sad sight, so that it becomes a Godardian ironic statement.

Top Trailers