For 173 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Paul Malcolm's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 90 The Fast Runner (Atanarjuat)
Lowest review score: 0 Black Knight
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 173
  2. Negative: 53 out of 173
173 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    With a brisk pace and satiric blend of nostalgia and violence, it's the sharpest, funniest comedy so far this year.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    The first REALLY great mythic film of the summer has arrived.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    The film's real power to move flows from its low, childlike angles, which, rather than infantalize its audience, bring it down to where the hurt and fear, and hence the comfort, loom larger.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    X
    It's all such a spectacular show.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    A meta-horror film that hilariously parodies the genre's clichés with smarts to spare. It's also the scariest fucking movie Craven has made since the first "A Nightmare on Elm Street."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Paul Malcolm
    For all its simplicity, however, the film is entertaining, even uplifting, with Lopez giving a stellar, confectionary performance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Proves too sincere to exploit its subjects and too honest to manipulate its audience.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    A tight blend of self-awareness, humor and fear.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    The film's intimate camera work and searing performances pull us deep into the girls' confusion and pain as they struggle tragically to comprehend the chasm of knowledge that's opened between them.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Sabu takes an already wildly original concept and launches it toward brilliance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Performances that are natural yet weighted with history and frequently heart-wrenching.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Baldwin's perfectly impacted performance as a tough-love provider (the actor gets some of the best lines in the movie).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    What makes the film compelling is the filmmakers' ability to blend a studied (occasionally academic) dissection of cultural and sexual decadence with a potboiler plot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Temple doesn't just highlight the contemporary relevance of Coleridge's liberated words and themes, he shows us how high they still soar.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Both funny and furious -- on why black people are different from white people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Climaxes in a flood of revelations that, like so much of the film, take us where we least expect to go.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    A remarkably moving and disturbing film about the possibility of belonging and the genealogy of violence.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    It's cheap thrills all the way, served up with the kind of situational purity that only Carpenter seems to care for these days. It's that simple and that much fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Kusturica's always masterful orchestration of chaos, coincidence and caricature really pays off as a sweet, soulful celebration of old friends, new loves and the mad scramble of life at the fringe.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Extraordinarily witty (nothing new for this director) while coming off as a taunt to anyone who'd dare to follow in his wake.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Hartnett's pitch-perfect sexual panic can be hilariously funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    While there are scenes of wrenching emotional openness and spontaneous charm -- largely due to the irresistible allure and impeccable craft of its ensemble cast -- the degree of calculation apparent in its plot and images undermines its efforts to move and seduce.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Shrek's first 20 minutes are so devilishly funny that letting go of pure belief doesn't seem like such a bad thing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    The Jackass boys achieve true genius, however, when they take their penance public. Before stunned, inert onlookers, these skate-punk Situationists transform official zones of work and leisure -- office parks, golf courses, bowling alleys -- into arenas of dangerous stupidity to remind us that, in the end, we’re all just meat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Writer-director Fabián Bielinsky's devilish Nine Queens serves as further evidence that Argentina's film industry is at the forefront of a resurgent Latin American cinema.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Remarkable exploration of sexuality and the Jewish faith.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Paul Malcolm
    Baumbach weds his verbal gifts to a fresh visual acuity that brings layers of rich detail to a portrait of a family coping, poorly, with self-inflicted change.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The film's plainness, and the understated force of van der Groen and Petersen's performances, sharpen its complexity of feeling until all mawkishness is cut away.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Captivating coming-of-age story.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Spins a warm and fuzzy tale about love and happiness in the cutthroat art business.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Storaro's gorgeous cinematography imbues every frame with an enthralling subjectivity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Maquiling offers us the unexpected pleasures of taking the side streets in a film about how even minor-key adventures can make a life stuck in low gear something to look back on.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The film's jarring shifts in tone ultimately serve well the complexity of the film's narrative entanglements; they feel more honest than similar Hollywood offerings.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Grisman's warm, loving home movie in the guise of a documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Malkovich and Dafoe play off each other with a devilish hamminess.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Thraves escapes formula by shaping the film around low-key incidents instead of speeches or overt lessons. There are plenty of side streets here.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Bowman and production designer Wolf Kroeger do an excellent job of evoking a twice-baked England, while writers Gregg Chabot, Kevin Peterka and Matt Greenberg keep the script devilishly pitched just shy of preposterous (it's McConaughey who stumbles beyond).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    At 60 minutes, the film never stops feeling like a guided tour, while we're wishing it was a sleepover.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    How Miike gets us from amiable point A to debilitating point B is a remarkable act of manipulation and control that may leave you feeling sucker-punched, even brutalized, but you won't forget the experience anytime soon.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    A deft exercise in atmospheric horror and insanity. Which is why it's unfortunate that, ultimately, Anderson steps back from the brink.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    While Stiller and De Niro can play hilariously off one another, the film -- despite its happy ending -- feels unresolved.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    It's whiz-bang, techno fun, with a touch of Latino flavor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    A pure font of high-flying kung fu artistry, the likes of which has since transformed the way Hollywood's good guys and bad kick the crap out of one another.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    A rosy, hearthside fantasy of acceptance that's so assured in its writing and direction, it's nearly impossible not to believe.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Whether on the high seas or in the Holy Land, the film exhibits a colorful, bouncy sense of the epic (the whale's Jaws-inspired arrival even elicits a few chills), while its saving grace is a consistent sense of its own absurdity.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The old hands still seem to be having a good time, so why the hell shouldnít we?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Slight but charming comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The stadiums and performance halls of Pyongyang become staging grounds for massive, highly choreographed political pageants that make the Nuremberg rallies look like dinner theater. You’ve never seen anything quite like these dazzling displays of groupthink.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    It's Garrison and Burnam who hold the film's center, however, with a natural magnetism. Newcomers both, they take the same clean approach to their roles that their characters bring to their tags.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    There’s a lot to like in writer-director Ray Yeung’s low-key romantic comedy, once you get past its overly enunciated identity issues, which were, according to Yeung, the film’s raison d’être.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    What feels genuine in the film -- mother-son bonds, the wedding party -- is surrounded by overdetermined and formulaic scenes lifted from other films.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    For the most part it delivers the goods.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    It would all be too obviously feel-good if Ducastel and Martineau weren't also tuned in to the liberating drift of the open highway and a sharp native humor that adds needed flesh and blood to their walking metaphors.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    A hyperreal, visually layered period style that finds film noir shadows creeping in at the edges of a blue-sky, get-along-to-go-along America.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Manipulative filmmaking at its most gently persuasive.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Kessler frames it all with an ironic eye (Stiller's misfit mogul holds court in cheap motels and burger joints) and with enough big-hearted tenderness to keep the humor from going sour.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Director Chang builds some chilling suspense into the cop's grim investigative routine -- as well as generous helpings of blood: It runs, splashes and sprays as the amputations continue.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Chop Suey really captivates with surfaces; look away for an instant, and the spell is broken.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Fate plays both prankster and deliverer in Firode's never-too-clever scheme, buoyed, like his often-winsome images, by romantic fancy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    The film lapses too often into sugary sentiment and withholds delivery on the pell-mell pyrotechnics its punchy style promises.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    The rough, watercolor washes of its city backdrops mark the film with nostalgia while its story carries us along at an amiable, buoyant pace.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    A conventional if appealing tear-jerker, The Way Home would like to grandmother us all.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Between spy training and sensitivity training, the two (Murphy/Wilson) prove nicely matched comic foils.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    What I mean is that to watch The Phantom Menace as a lifelong "Star Wars" fan is to engage in constant, fragile negotiations between a cherished familiarity and the shock of the new.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    It's a refreshing change from the self-interest and paranoia that shape most American representations of Castro. At the same time, Bravo anticipates that such a view will drive some nuts.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Nemesis never feels true to itself, its energy never fully engaged. Even with Earth on the line in its climactic space battle, the film seems embarrassed that it couldn't have found a better way to work through its issues.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    While Slums of Beverly Hills may sound like a downer, Jenkins tempers the family's downbeat circumstances with sympathetic humor, a quirky camera style and lo-fi retro flavor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Shadow Magic is rich with detail.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Softley starts out a little awkwardly, as he tries to capture turn-of-the-century flux by opening several London scenes from disorienting, too-obvious camera positions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Railsback and Snodgrass struggle against caricature in their own fine performances.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    It's all part of a larger calculus that the filmmakers hope will translate into a thinking person's thriller. If only they themselves knew how to figure it.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    It does, however, fairly bubble with speed-freak energy and a dry, laddish wit that keeps the jokes coming.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Sympathy is disturbingly cast aside so we can wallow in the pathetic. It’s a bad trip, man.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    What at first seems emotionally charged, ultimately comes off as contrived.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Writer-director Avi Nesher and co-screenwriter Roger Berger -- upon whose real-life investigations the film is based -- deliver on the hard-boiled promise of this low-key thriller with plenty of gritty twists and turns.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    A half-baked classic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    The film's larger, surprisingly mature emotional rhythms are strong enough to pull it through.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Jalil penetrates a carnivalesque subculture of self-reinvention and obsession, emotional need and materialist greed, with a camera that is, by turns, cruel, kind and incisive.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    The sharpness of Eyre's opening, however, ebbs away when he takes up the story of Rudy (Eric Schweig) and Mogie (Graham Greene), two brothers with neatly opposed responses to the reservation grind.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    It's an amusing scenario, until even Miike seems to lose his taste for the oddly sweet concoction and allows the film to drift aimlessly to a rainbow-hued finale.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    While the film throws a solid pop punch, you could still swear you've seen it all before.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    xXx
    The film gives good action (amid more tired spy business) but comes riddled with contradictions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Far too complex and provoking.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Ironically, for all the paranoia, York's Defiler and his henchman, an always game Udo Kier, are an oasis of wit in an otherwise parched, self-serious script.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Ultimately, Jolie's efforts to establish a character are dashed against the film's increasingly inane dialogue.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    These live performances and classic music videos drive home the point that part of the Giants' longevity flows from the fact that they can't be explained, only experienced.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Shooting Fish wants to hang with the hip crowd--witness the vibrant colors, the flashy camera work and the stream of catchy pop songs--but its heart just isn't wild enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    The movie's real charms lie in its surprisingly dark atmosphere and its almost subversive sense of humor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    An overly mannered film drowning in the symptoms of dysfunction but unable to tap the root causes of this WASPish clan's pain except in the most oblique and cursory ways. This might be Freundlich's point, considering this family deals with its problems through avoidance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    Director Olli Saarela, who co-wrote the script with Antti Tuuri, offers up a trembling romanticism that gradually hardens -- like Eero's consciousness -- with exposure to the horrors of war.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    It's abundantly clear that Lozano and company have been re-watching "Pulp Fiction" for the last decade, pausing long enough to pick up the fluid rhythms of "Y Tu Mamá También" and "Amores Perros" while completely missing those films' social and political edges.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Paul Malcolm
    It's the zippy chatter among the Serenity's wised-up space pirates that gives the film most of its punch, but with only serviceable action sequences and largely cookie-cutter effects, you can still sense the void just outside.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Written by a team of three, the script is more plagued by groupthink than is the film's future Earth.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    A Rumor of Angels beats its wings furiously, only to sink back into spiritualist goo.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Director Ernest -- doesn't skimp on style in a film that bluntly exploits social conscience to pump up its taste for gore.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Kazantzidis struggles for the flavor of classic romance, with a string of standards on the soundtrack to little avail.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    None of it rings true, and it distracts from the film's real heart, which, on its own, would have made for a strikingly original first film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Struggles to achieve a giddy eccentricity that never fully emerges.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Though the two-hour film can go slack with excess explication, Shiri compensates with an overheated drive that forces the myopia of current events toward a broader field of vision.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Paul Malcolm
    Unfortunately, it's our knowledge of what's actually to come that puts much of the chill and complexity in Hopkins' rather formulaic script.