For 173 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Paul Malcolm's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 90 X
Lowest review score: 0 Rollerball
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 173
  2. Negative: 53 out of 173
173 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    How Miike gets us from amiable point A to debilitating point B is a remarkable act of manipulation and control that may leave you feeling sucker-punched, even brutalized, but you won't forget the experience anytime soon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Malkovich and Dafoe play off each other with a devilish hamminess.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The film's plainness, and the understated force of van der Groen and Petersen's performances, sharpen its complexity of feeling until all mawkishness is cut away.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Spins a warm and fuzzy tale about love and happiness in the cutthroat art business.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Captivating coming-of-age story.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    A pure font of high-flying kung fu artistry, the likes of which has since transformed the way Hollywood's good guys and bad kick the crap out of one another.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    It's Garrison and Burnam who hold the film's center, however, with a natural magnetism. Newcomers both, they take the same clean approach to their roles that their characters bring to their tags.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Whether on the high seas or in the Holy Land, the film exhibits a colorful, bouncy sense of the epic (the whale's Jaws-inspired arrival even elicits a few chills), while its saving grace is a consistent sense of its own absurdity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    At 60 minutes, the film never stops feeling like a guided tour, while we're wishing it was a sleepover.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Thraves escapes formula by shaping the film around low-key incidents instead of speeches or overt lessons. There are plenty of side streets here.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The film's jarring shifts in tone ultimately serve well the complexity of the film's narrative entanglements; they feel more honest than similar Hollywood offerings.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The old hands still seem to be having a good time, so why the hell shouldnít we?
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Bowman and production designer Wolf Kroeger do an excellent job of evoking a twice-baked England, while writers Gregg Chabot, Kevin Peterka and Matt Greenberg keep the script devilishly pitched just shy of preposterous (it's McConaughey who stumbles beyond).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    While Stiller and De Niro can play hilariously off one another, the film -- despite its happy ending -- feels unresolved.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    It's whiz-bang, techno fun, with a touch of Latino flavor.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Slight but charming comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Maquiling offers us the unexpected pleasures of taking the side streets in a film about how even minor-key adventures can make a life stuck in low gear something to look back on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    There’s a lot to like in writer-director Ray Yeung’s low-key romantic comedy, once you get past its overly enunciated identity issues, which were, according to Yeung, the film’s raison d’être.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    Grisman's warm, loving home movie in the guise of a documentary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Paul Malcolm
    The stadiums and performance halls of Pyongyang become staging grounds for massive, highly choreographed political pageants that make the Nuremberg rallies look like dinner theater. You’ve never seen anything quite like these dazzling displays of groupthink.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    What feels genuine in the film -- mother-son bonds, the wedding party -- is surrounded by overdetermined and formulaic scenes lifted from other films.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    It would all be too obviously feel-good if Ducastel and Martineau weren't also tuned in to the liberating drift of the open highway and a sharp native humor that adds needed flesh and blood to their walking metaphors.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Director Chang builds some chilling suspense into the cop's grim investigative routine -- as well as generous helpings of blood: It runs, splashes and sprays as the amputations continue.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    A hyperreal, visually layered period style that finds film noir shadows creeping in at the edges of a blue-sky, get-along-to-go-along America.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Fate plays both prankster and deliverer in Firode's never-too-clever scheme, buoyed, like his often-winsome images, by romantic fancy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Softley starts out a little awkwardly, as he tries to capture turn-of-the-century flux by opening several London scenes from disorienting, too-obvious camera positions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    A conventional if appealing tear-jerker, The Way Home would like to grandmother us all.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    For the most part it delivers the goods.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    Between spy training and sensitivity training, the two (Murphy/Wilson) prove nicely matched comic foils.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Paul Malcolm
    What I mean is that to watch The Phantom Menace as a lifelong "Star Wars" fan is to engage in constant, fragile negotiations between a cherished familiarity and the shock of the new.

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