Peter Bradshaw
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For 368 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Bradshaw's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Nothing But a Man (1964)
Lowest review score: 20 Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 368
368 movie reviews
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It runs out of steam in the final 10 minutes, but there's some gruesome drama and Cusack is on decent form.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Sightseers is funny and well made, but Wheatley could be suffering from difficult third album syndrome: this is not as mysterious and interesting as Kill List.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It has plenty of energy and drive, and Jeremy Renner is really good, better as a Bourne-y agent than Matt Damon, tougher and more grizzled-looking, more convincing as the professional soldier who has grown careworn and disillusioned in the public service.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    The movie is intensely acted, with a sense of interior longing possibly inspired by Terrence Malick, but it is also sometimes contrived and straining self-consciously for dramatic mood and moment.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It is a strange, clenched movie: weirdly compelling, with an undertone of absurdity worthy of Woody Allen’s Love and Death.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    The Sessions can be sugary, but it's likable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Nothing in the movie matches the fascination of its premise and its opening 10 minutes: the undisturbed status quo is mesmeric. Once the narrative grinds into gear, however, the film's distinctive quality is lost.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It's a bit sucrose, especially at the beginning, but this traditional, sweet-natured family film will tug on the heartstrings.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Some of the movie doesn't exactly convince, and some of the scenes have an actors-improv feel to them, but there's always plenty of humour and energy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Hang on for the outtake bloopers over the credits and you'll see Aniston momentarily unsure how to take a joke at her expense.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    For all the guns and gore, it's as breezy and uncritical as a tale from the True Detective magazine that the cops can't help reading.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It's all watchable and pretty funny, and the big setpiece is the three wildly queeny stewards Joserra, Fajas (Carlos Areces) and Ulloa (Arévalo) going into a drug-fuelled song-and-dance routine: a rendering of the Pointer Sisters' I'm So Excited.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    With a sly dreaminess, Vikander steals the movie from the two males.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    For all the competence and strength of Trapero's direction, the film is not as powerful as it might have been.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    The spectacle of highly competent professionals going about their work is always absorbing, and Simons is an interesting man: reticent, calm, shy, intensely focused but apparently never losing control until the end.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    With playful touches of Spielberg, Shyamalan and even Hitchcock, veteran director Joe Dante has confected a neat little scary movie, not explicitly violent, but pretty scary nonetheless.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Marsh's movie is calm, level, downbeat. The tension is subtle – perhaps subtler than it really should be.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Saving Mr Banks is an indulgent, overlong picture which is always on the verge of becoming a mess. Thankfully, reliable old Tom Hanks snaps his fingers and – spit, spot – everything more or less gets cleared away.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It's an intriguing and distinctive story, soberly told.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Nicolas Cage, Vanessa Hudgens and John Cusack give solid performances in this Prime Suspect-like thriller.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    This film is justifiably celebratory and respectful, and it reaches out beyond the rock fanbase.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It's a straightforward, heartfelt drama, well acted and well produced.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Quite a spectacle, and a nice family outing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    This really is a reasonably, moderately, whelmingly good film.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Her
    I wished I liked it more. It is engagingly self-aware and excruciatingly self-conscious, wearing its hipness on its sleeve; it's ingenious and yet remarkably contrived. The film seems very new, but the sentimental ending is as old as the hills. There are some great moments.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It’s a big, ambitious, continent-spanning piece of work, concerned to show the Armenian horror was absorbed into the bloodstream of immigrant-descended population in the United States, but it is a little simplistic emotionally.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It’s a little hammy and soapy, with an occasional Pythonesque sense of its own importance but this film, directed by Richard Laxton, is performed with gusto.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a formal and pedagogic production, but worthwhile nonetheless.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    This inevitably doesn’t have the charge of the first story, but it is still interestingly weird and dreamlike, and quite disturbing. A commercially driven sequel, sure – but still effective.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    At times it looks like a parade of celebs, but the film comes belatedly to the point when it discusses Corbijn's parents, particularly his late father, whose approval Anton sought but perhaps never quite got.

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