Peter Debruge
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For 389 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Skyfall
Lowest review score: 0 Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 75 out of 389
389 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Putting the "intelligence" in MI6, Skyfall reps a smart, savvy and incredibly satisfying addition to the 007 oeuvre, one that places Judi Dench's M at the center of the action.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    With plenty to appeal to boys and girls, old and young, Walt Disney Animation Studios has a high-scoring hit on its hands in this brilliantly conceived, gorgeously executed toon, earning bonus points for backing nostalgia with genuine emotion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    An immensely satisfying taste of antebellum empowerment packaged as spaghetti-Western homage... A bloody hilarious (and hilariously bloody) Christmas counter-programmer.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Though the film brims with memorable characters, the show ultimately belongs to Ejiofor, who upholds the character’s dignity throughout.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Not just one of the great racing movies of all time, but a virtuoso feat of filmmaking in its own right, elevated by two of the year’s most compelling performances.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    The film manages to educate without ever feeling didactic, and to entertain in the face of what would, to any other character, seem like a grim life sentence.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    This is the director’s most accessible and naturalistic film, using everyday characters to test how well modern-day Russia is maintaining the social contract with its citizens.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    A triumph on every creative level, from casting to execution.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    With My Flesh and Blood, Karsh finds a worthy subject in the constant day-to-day challenges facing a truly extraordinary family.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Garden State gets it. Not since "The Graduate" has a movie nailed the beautiful terror of standing on the brink of adulthood with such satisfying precision.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Delivers a polished and well-researched look at America 's largest corporate bankruptcy with a laser-sharp focus on the personalities, practices, and fates of the top executives behind the Enron meltdown.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Brothers takes a scenario as old as Genesis – two jealous siblings spar over the affections of the same woman – and renders it fresh and immediate, by virtue of the warm, almost maternal, generosity director Susanne Bier shows her characters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Every so often, a movie blindsides you, leaving you feeling different, enlightened, possibly even improved. Me and You and Everyone We Know is such a movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Three Burials is beautiful, authentic and brutally observant of human nature. With real Tex-Mex backdrops instead of the usual Monument Valley vistas and characters too complex to withstand simple white-hat/black-hat reductionism, Three Burials is a visionary portrait of the New West. This is the terrain of Eastwood and Peckinpah, saddled with the concerns of 21st-century life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Considering Haneke's confrontational past, this poignantly acted, uncommonly tender two-hander makes a doubly powerful statement about man's capacity for dignity and sensitivity when confronted with the inevitable cruelty of nature.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Far more ambitious than "The Hurt Locker," yet nowhere near so tripwire-tense, this procedure-driven, decade-spanning docudrama nevertheless rivets for most of its running time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    While Leon’s script can’t help but be episodic as the characters scheme their way out of one scrape after another, their shenanigans are compulsively watchable, brimming with enough details to make this modest film grow large in the memory.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The beauty of the footage is undeniable, and the aimlessness never overstays its welcome as the film documents that strange stretch in our lives when nothing seems to matter more than the present moment, suspended in a sort of idle immortality.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    This compelling human drama finds fresh energy in the inspirational-teacher genre, constantly revealing new layers to its characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Assembled from three years’ worth of visits to one of the world’s most volatile hot zones, the format of Stolen Seas is as every bit as exciting as its content, raising beguiling questions about how the team managed to acquire the footage so stunningly interwoven by editor Garret Price.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The result is just about the most fun you can have while learning, partly because it strips away any tangents beyond the task at hand, offering a lean, 80-minute account of how this crazy guy erected his own Everest and then proceeded to climb it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    [Francis] Lawrence and his team have calibrated the entire experience for maximum engagement. And while its pleasures can’t touch the thrill of seeing the Death Star destroyed — not yet, at least — the film runs circles around George Lucas’ ability to weave complex political ideas into the very fabric of B-movie excitement.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The circumstances may be contrived, but the characters feel refreshingly genuine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    At this finely tooled tragedy’s core towers Emilie Dequenne, no longer the feral young thing seen in 1999′s “Rosetta,” but a trapped animal pushed to devastating extremes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Chazelle proves an exceptional builder of scenes, crafting loaded, need-to-succeed moments that grab our attention and hold it tight.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    With Boyhood, Linklater has created an uncanny time capsule, inviting auds to relive their own upbringing through a series of artificial memories pressed like flowers between the pages of a family photo album.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Love Is Strange never feels anything less than authentic, like a true story shared by close friends.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Despite the staggering range of material Watermark manages to present — Burtynsky’s five-year undertaking is certainly the most encompassing survey any one artist has ever dedicated to the subject — it’s still just the tip of the metaphorical iceberg.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Beneath the Harvest Sky offers a heartbreakingly authentic, vividly realized account of adolescent frustration and yearning.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    If necessity is the mother of invention, then DreamWorks’ desire to extend the Dragon franchise has propelled the creative team in the most admirable of directions, resulting in what just may be the mother of all animated sequels.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    It’s uncanny how much Dolan’s style and overall solipsism have evolved in five years’ time, resulting in a funny, heartbreaking and, above all, original work — right down to its unusual 1:1 aspect ratio — that feels derivative of no one, not even himself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Binoche leaves audiences with the same exhilarating feeling here — of having witnessed something precious and rare — answering the challenge of Assayas’ script by revealing a character incredibly closer to her soul.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    As in “Water Lilies” and “Tomboy” before this, Sciamma pushes past superficial anthropological study to deliver a vital, nonjudgmental character study.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Visually stunning even in its most banal moments and emotionally perceptive almost to a fault.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    What the film lacks in context it gains in visceral eyewitness value.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Herzog himself is one of the great lunatic directors of our century, a mad genius who repeatedly attempts to challenge nature and the gods in his own films.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    A wild buckle-up-and-blast-off adventure that plunges every corner of kids' favorite subject.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    In a year rich with animation options, Happy Feet stands head and shoulders above its competition.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Virtually everything Americans know about Ellis Island they've learned from the movies, and virtually all those movies were American. Golden Door offers the other side of the story, the one that ends at Ellis Island instead of beginning there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Broken English takes 30 minutes to do what most romantic comedies manage with a simple montage. That's a good thing, by the way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    In the annals of Mediterranean island love stories, Respiro reflects the effortless charm of a film like "Il Postino," rather than the untidy manufactured romance of another "Captain Corelli's Mandolin."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Bardem plays the part with all the pent-up animal rage of a young Robert De Niro.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    A brilliant little exercise. As a horror movie, it packs one genuine scare after another, right up to the moment of its inconceivably ghastly end. As a mystery, it unfolds with an almost supernatural elegance. And as a metaphor for the movies themselves, it's truly exceptional.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Resurrection is a revelation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    In the end, it's not the answer to the kitchen mystery that matters but the revelation that there's ultimately no difference between this bachelor scientist and his bachelor subject.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Reveals more about the German people through sentimental comedy than such overtly political films as "The Nasty Girl" or "The Marriage of Maria Braun."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Think of how M. Night Shyamalan redefined the ghost story (The Sixth Sense), the superhero creation myth (Unbreakable), and the alien-invasion epic (Signs)--and you may get a sense of the genius behind this fascinating new horror film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Nearly perfect in its own cotton-candy way.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Take it from someone who can still feel the hollow rubber tang! of old dodgeball scars: It feels great to be blindsided by a little movie like this.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    In his first feature, director Joshua Marston passes no judgments. He doesn't condemn drugs. He merely depicts the system that has arisen to support this illicit trade.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Conran's Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow is a pastiche of everything from "King Kong" to "The Wizard of Oz," a movie that escalates to a breathless cliff-hanger every 20 minutes or so and reinvents itself with every reel.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Most likely chosen for its shaggy-dog looks, Winn-Dixie is actually a great deal more special than you'd expect, a fitting analogy for a film no parent should be too quick to dismiss.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Murderball asks you to put all your assumptions about quadriplegics aside and start over.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    That rare kind of movie that contrasts "cultured" big-city characters with devout, "simple" folk without being condescending or judgmental of either camp.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Woody's a master wordsmith, and here he's crafted a bit of audience-friendly fare that's smart without feeling exclusionary. It's a portrait of elite society--and the hangers-on who wish to penetrate it--made in an surprisingly accessible way.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    On the surface, each of these characters fits a familiar Latino stereotype--teen harlot, "el bandido" and male buffoon--yet the movie insists on giving each person dimension.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Ultimately, the mock-doc device works because Gyllenhaal and Pena so completely reinvent themselves in-character. Instead of wearing the roles like costumes or uniforms, they let the job seep into their skin, a feat without which "End of Watch's" pseudo-reality never would have worked.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Hoping to do for flesh-eaters what "The Twilight Saga" did for vampires, albeit on a smaller scale, writer-director Jonathan Levine spins Isaac Marion's novel into a broadly appealing date movie about a zombified Romeo and his lively Juliet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Mud
    Mud poses as a mere adolescent adventure tale but explores a rich vein of grown-up concerns, exploring codes of honor, love and family too solid to be shaken by modernizing forces.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Never before has anyone made a documentary like The Act of Killing, and the filmmakers seem at a loss in terms of how to organize the many threads of what they capture...Still, essential and enraging, The Act of Killing is a film that begs to be seen, then never watched again.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    For most of its running time, this personality-packed docu is nothing short of absorbing as it recaps the essential role African-American background singers played in shaping the sound of 20th-century pop music.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Slow as molasses but every bit as rich.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The satire is firmly seated in character, and no one understands how well a good homicide can elucidate character better than Wheatley.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    More inspired by than adapted from Juan Mayorga’s play “The Boy in the Last Row,” this low-key thriller feels like a return to form for Ozon, whose pictures lost their psychosexual edge after the helmer stopped collaborating with Emmanuele Bernheim (“Swimming Pool”).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This rich, beautifully rendered film boasts an arrestingly soulful performance from Marion Cotillard.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    While the plot — too low-key to be called a thriller — points toward obvious extramarital cliches, delicate changes in the overall mood reveal deeper truths.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The Wolverine boasts one of the best pulp-inspired scripts yet. It’s still full of corny dialogue...but there’s a genuine elegance to the way it establishes Logan’s tortured condition and slowly brings the character around to recovering his heroic potential, methodically setting up and paying off ideas as it unfolds.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The source material may be David Sedaris (this marks the first time the essayist has allowed one of his pieces to be adapted), but the tone couldn’t be more Kyle Patrick Alvarez, who once again steers auds to some gloriously uncomfortable places.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A film that lays emotions on the line and then drives them home with music.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    John Turturro brings sensitivity and intelligence to a subject that could have gone terribly awry in Fading Gigolo.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Of all living actresses, only Huppert could capture nuances that alternately elicit sympathy and fierce sexual attraction to a recent stroke victim.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Disguised as a drunken cartwheel through expat paradise, Mark Jarrett’s striking feature juggles questions of mortality along its rowdy cross-country path.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    With the aid of Johnsen’s doc to overcome the obstacles China has put in his path, Ai’s voice carries louder than ever before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Racy subject aside, the film provides a good-humored yet serious-minded look at sexual self-liberation, thick with references to art, music, religion and literature, even as it pushes the envelope with footage of acts previously relegated to the sphere of pornography.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    It’s one thing to declare sex a fact of life and insist that audiences confront their unease at seeing it depicted (or, equally constructive, their intense excitation at its mere mention), but quite another to fashion a fictional woman’s life around nothing but sex. As courageously depicted by Gainsbourg, Jo is ultimately a tragic character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Pavich does an admirable job tracking down surviving parties (except for the suspicious-sounding cast), opting for a humorous rather than indignant tone to the interviews.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Helmer Lenny Abrahamson (“Garage,” “Adam & Paul”) puts the pic’s eccentricity to good use, luring in skeptics with jokey surrealism and delivering them to a profoundly moving place.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Using Baltimore’s dirt-bike groups as its entry point, the film offers a remarkable grassroots look at how the system is broken at the inner-city level.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Everything about the three principal teens registers as deserving of “human interest” to Rich Hill’s two helmers, whose generous attitude draws us into this deeply empathetic film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Phil Lord and Christopher Miller irreverently deconstruct the state of the modern blockbuster and deliver a smarter, more satisfying experience in its place, emerging with a fresh franchise for others to build upon.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Best known as the screenwriter of such subtext-rich adaptations as “The Wings of the Dove” and “Drive,” Amini excels at conveying the subtle, unspoken tensions between characters, selecting a tightrope-risky example with which to make his directorial debut and orchestrating it with aplomb.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The pic owes its believability to Asser, who served as a therapist similar to Oliver’s character, drawing from his experience to shape the world. Asser brings more than just realism, however, crafting the central father-son relationship on the foundation of classical Greek tragedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Meticulously acted, gorgeously shot and hilariously insightful about the strange, inarticulable ways people can get on one another’s nerves, this psychological thriller takes its premise to surprising, darkly comic extremes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The humor springs either from real-world recognition, as Robespierre and her co-writers go where others fear to tread, or in response to the cast’s lively, eccentrically lived-in characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Unlike other actor-directors, Jones never seems to indulge excess on the part of his cast. Though the characters are strong, the performances are understated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This day-in-the-life indie says something profound about an entire generation simply by watching a feckless young man try to figure it out.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The story distinguishes itself from other anime offerings through its attention to both visual and emotional realism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Despite all that it withholds, The Strange Little Cat ultimately proves a far more revealing form of family portrait.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A spunky yet surprisingly sad portrait of a sexually liberated man held captive by his past, forever chasing and trying to rewrite his own legend.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    If there's one thing missing above all else from today's action movies, it's the lost art of the car chase.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    It's like "Lock, Stock" as filtered through the mind of David Mamet, with Craig as the suave middleman holding it all together.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    The result is an eye-opening social portrait in the tradition of "Paris Is Burning," the landmark 1990 documentary that introduced drag balls and ''vogueing'' to the mainstream, but it lacks the earlier film's structure and focus.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    A haunting, poetic film, and yet it suffers two major failings. First, Murray provides too blank a slate for the audience to appreciate whatever insights a more expressive performance might have offered. Second, and far more troubling, is the way Jarmusch refuses to take his female characters seriously.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    Valiant enlists a squad of loveable birdbrains to turn the classic fighter-pilot formula into an upbeat adventure film loaded with laughs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    With its predictable confrontations and tacky fantasy sequences, you feel writer/director Jane Anderson steering the material toward schmaltzy movie-of-the-week territory at every turn.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang is a movie obsessed more with the act of telling a story than the story itself, which explains why, when the movie's finally over, less than half the audience will have understood the finer points of the mystery.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    The most extreme English-language studio release I've seen in years.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    The Proposition leaves you shell-shocked.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Debruge
    Kids will eat it up, while solid voice work from William Shatner and Wanda Sykes should keep this borderline-feral toon from pushing adults over the edge.