Peter Debruge

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For 537 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Inside Out
Lowest review score: 0 Another Gay Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 80 out of 537
537 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Pavich does an admirable job tracking down surviving parties (except for the suspicious-sounding cast), opting for a humorous rather than indignant tone to the interviews.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Helmer Lenny Abrahamson (“Garage,” “Adam & Paul”) puts the pic’s eccentricity to good use, luring in skeptics with jokey surrealism and delivering them to a profoundly moving place.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Using Baltimore’s dirt-bike groups as its entry point, the film offers a remarkable grassroots look at how the system is broken at the inner-city level.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Everything about the three principal teens registers as deserving of “human interest” to Rich Hill’s two helmers, whose generous attitude draws us into this deeply empathetic film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Phil Lord and Christopher Miller irreverently deconstruct the state of the modern blockbuster and deliver a smarter, more satisfying experience in its place, emerging with a fresh franchise for others to build upon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Best known as the screenwriter of such subtext-rich adaptations as “The Wings of the Dove” and “Drive,” Amini excels at conveying the subtle, unspoken tensions between characters, selecting a tightrope-risky example with which to make his directorial debut and orchestrating it with aplomb.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The pic owes its believability to Asser, who served as a therapist similar to Oliver’s character, drawing from his experience to shape the world. Asser brings more than just realism, however, crafting the central father-son relationship on the foundation of classical Greek tragedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Meticulously acted, gorgeously shot and hilariously insightful about the strange, inarticulable ways people can get on one another’s nerves, this psychological thriller takes its premise to surprising, darkly comic extremes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The humor springs either from real-world recognition, as Robespierre and her co-writers go where others fear to tread, or in response to the cast’s lively, eccentrically lived-in characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Unlike other actor-directors, Jones never seems to indulge excess on the part of his cast. Though the characters are strong, the performances are understated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This day-in-the-life indie says something profound about an entire generation simply by watching a feckless young man try to figure it out.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The story distinguishes itself from other anime offerings through its attention to both visual and emotional realism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Despite all that it withholds, The Strange Little Cat ultimately proves a far more revealing form of family portrait.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A spunky yet surprisingly sad portrait of a sexually liberated man held captive by his past, forever chasing and trying to rewrite his own legend.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    With St. Vincent, the chief pleasure is comedy, which typically arises from waiting to discover what Bill Murray might do next.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Despite his movie-star reputation and looks, Mortensen remains a remarkably humble screen presence, a trait that’s perfect for a part that demands considerable empathy from whoever’s playing it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Shooting in sleek 35mm, Franz and Fiala have dreamt up a home-invasion scenario where the aggressors lived there all along.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Scherfig approaches the milieu with shrewd anthropological wit, amplifying Wade’s research with her own keen outsider insights — this on top of an expert grasp of tension and tone as the club’s initial allure turns to anxiety and disgust.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Apart from the heavy debt it owes to Malick’s oeuvre, Edwards’ entrancing debut is radically non-generic, either as history film and coming-of-age piece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Though Fanon’s words serve to justify the seemingly unconscionable — violence — the film ends with a very different call to action, one that stresses the need for “new concepts,” as if trying to calm the blood the film has brought to a boil over the dense and daunting 80-odd minutes that have come before.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Yonebayashi’s open-hearted tale, more than any other Ghibli offering, could conceivably have worked just as well in live-action, and yet the tender story gains so much from the studio’s delicate, hand-crafted approach.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Often poignant, occasionally pathetic, but never short of entertaining, Raiders! captures the obsessive hold movies have on young people’s imaginations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A mesmerizing glimpse into Sarno’s search for a sub-Saharan Walden and the implications of that choice.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Nothing about the circumstances revealed in The Harvest could be called normal, and yet it’s a credit to a fertile imagination that the film proves so terrifyingly relatable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Think of Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet as a gift: a work of essential spiritual enlightenment, elegantly interpreted by nine of the world’s leading independent animators, all tied up and wrapped in a family-friendly bow by “The Lion King” director Roger Allers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Alleluia may be a remake, but its somber look couldn’t be more original — all the better for the film to spring its nasty surprises on auds, none more unexpected than the way certain shots remain seared into one’s subconscious in the days and weeks that follow.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    For Guadagnino, it’s not the characters’ fates that matter so much as their dynamics, which Kajganich and the director manipulate with the sort of take-no-prisoners attitude typically reserved for theater, pushing the entire ensemble to their full potential.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The helmer shows exquisite control of the world he has created.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Argentine powerhouse Pablo Trapero (“Carancho,” “White Elephant”) takes a case so upsetting many refused to believe it was possible and retells it in ghastly detail from the p.o.v. of the perpetrators in The Clan, a muscular, Hollywood-style account of the Puccio fiasco.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    With its linear narrative and clear sense of a protagonist, Evolution is both more beautiful (thanks to gorgeous widescreen cinematography, including stunning underwater and nighttime footage, from “The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears” d.p. Manu Dacosse) and accessible than “Innocence,” though the two films clearly function best as the twisted diptych that they are.

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