For 178 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 12 Years a Slave
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 92 out of 178
  2. Negative: 17 out of 178
178 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Putting the "intelligence" in MI6, Skyfall reps a smart, savvy and incredibly satisfying addition to the 007 oeuvre, one that places Judi Dench's M at the center of the action.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    With plenty to appeal to boys and girls, old and young, Walt Disney Animation Studios has a high-scoring hit on its hands in this brilliantly conceived, gorgeously executed toon, earning bonus points for backing nostalgia with genuine emotion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    An immensely satisfying taste of antebellum empowerment packaged as spaghetti-Western homage... A bloody hilarious (and hilariously bloody) Christmas counter-programmer.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Though the film brims with memorable characters, the show ultimately belongs to Ejiofor, who upholds the character’s dignity throughout.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Not just one of the great racing movies of all time, but a virtuoso feat of filmmaking in its own right, elevated by two of the year’s most compelling performances.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    The film manages to educate without ever feeling didactic, and to entertain in the face of what would, to any other character, seem like a grim life sentence.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    This is the director’s most accessible and naturalistic film, using everyday characters to test how well modern-day Russia is maintaining the social contract with its citizens.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Considering Haneke's confrontational past, this poignantly acted, uncommonly tender two-hander makes a doubly powerful statement about man's capacity for dignity and sensitivity when confronted with the inevitable cruelty of nature.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Far more ambitious than "The Hurt Locker," yet nowhere near so tripwire-tense, this procedure-driven, decade-spanning docudrama nevertheless rivets for most of its running time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    While Leon’s script can’t help but be episodic as the characters scheme their way out of one scrape after another, their shenanigans are compulsively watchable, brimming with enough details to make this modest film grow large in the memory.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The beauty of the footage is undeniable, and the aimlessness never overstays its welcome as the film documents that strange stretch in our lives when nothing seems to matter more than the present moment, suspended in a sort of idle immortality.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    This compelling human drama finds fresh energy in the inspirational-teacher genre, constantly revealing new layers to its characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Assembled from three years’ worth of visits to one of the world’s most volatile hot zones, the format of Stolen Seas is as every bit as exciting as its content, raising beguiling questions about how the team managed to acquire the footage so stunningly interwoven by editor Garret Price.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The result is just about the most fun you can have while learning, partly because it strips away any tangents beyond the task at hand, offering a lean, 80-minute account of how this crazy guy erected his own Everest and then proceeded to climb it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    [Francis] Lawrence and his team have calibrated the entire experience for maximum engagement. And while its pleasures can’t touch the thrill of seeing the Death Star destroyed — not yet, at least — the film runs circles around George Lucas’ ability to weave complex political ideas into the very fabric of B-movie excitement.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    The circumstances may be contrived, but the characters feel refreshingly genuine.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    At this finely tooled tragedy’s core towers Emilie Dequenne, no longer the feral young thing seen in 1999′s “Rosetta,” but a trapped animal pushed to devastating extremes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Chazelle proves an exceptional builder of scenes, crafting loaded, need-to-succeed moments that grab our attention and hold it tight.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    With Boyhood, Linklater has created an uncanny time capsule, inviting auds to relive their own upbringing through a series of artificial memories pressed like flowers between the pages of a family photo album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Love Is Strange never feels anything less than authentic, like a true story shared by close friends.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Despite the staggering range of material Watermark manages to present — Burtynsky’s five-year undertaking is certainly the most encompassing survey any one artist has ever dedicated to the subject — it’s still just the tip of the metaphorical iceberg.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Beneath the Harvest Sky offers a heartbreakingly authentic, vividly realized account of adolescent frustration and yearning.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    If necessity is the mother of invention, then DreamWorks’ desire to extend the Dragon franchise has propelled the creative team in the most admirable of directions, resulting in what just may be the mother of all animated sequels.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    It’s uncanny how much Dolan’s style and overall solipsism have evolved in five years’ time, resulting in a funny, heartbreaking and, above all, original work — right down to its unusual 1:1 aspect ratio — that feels derivative of no one, not even himself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Binoche leaves audiences with the same exhilarating feeling here — of having witnessed something precious and rare — answering the challenge of Assayas’ script by revealing a character incredibly closer to her soul.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    As in “Water Lilies” and “Tomboy” before this, Sciamma pushes past superficial anthropological study to deliver a vital, nonjudgmental character study.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Visually stunning even in its most banal moments and emotionally perceptive almost to a fault.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    What the film lacks in context it gains in visceral eyewitness value.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Ultimately, the mock-doc device works because Gyllenhaal and Pena so completely reinvent themselves in-character. Instead of wearing the roles like costumes or uniforms, they let the job seep into their skin, a feat without which "End of Watch's" pseudo-reality never would have worked.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Hoping to do for flesh-eaters what "The Twilight Saga" did for vampires, albeit on a smaller scale, writer-director Jonathan Levine spins Isaac Marion's novel into a broadly appealing date movie about a zombified Romeo and his lively Juliet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Mud
    Mud poses as a mere adolescent adventure tale but explores a rich vein of grown-up concerns, exploring codes of honor, love and family too solid to be shaken by modernizing forces.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Never before has anyone made a documentary like The Act of Killing, and the filmmakers seem at a loss in terms of how to organize the many threads of what they capture...Still, essential and enraging, The Act of Killing is a film that begs to be seen, then never watched again.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    For most of its running time, this personality-packed docu is nothing short of absorbing as it recaps the essential role African-American background singers played in shaping the sound of 20th-century pop music.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Slow as molasses but every bit as rich.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The satire is firmly seated in character, and no one understands how well a good homicide can elucidate character better than Wheatley.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    More inspired by than adapted from Juan Mayorga’s play “The Boy in the Last Row,” this low-key thriller feels like a return to form for Ozon, whose pictures lost their psychosexual edge after the helmer stopped collaborating with Emmanuele Bernheim (“Swimming Pool”).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This rich, beautifully rendered film boasts an arrestingly soulful performance from Marion Cotillard.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    While the plot — too low-key to be called a thriller — points toward obvious extramarital cliches, delicate changes in the overall mood reveal deeper truths.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The Wolverine boasts one of the best pulp-inspired scripts yet. It’s still full of corny dialogue...but there’s a genuine elegance to the way it establishes Logan’s tortured condition and slowly brings the character around to recovering his heroic potential, methodically setting up and paying off ideas as it unfolds.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The source material may be David Sedaris (this marks the first time the essayist has allowed one of his pieces to be adapted), but the tone couldn’t be more Kyle Patrick Alvarez, who once again steers auds to some gloriously uncomfortable places.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A film that lays emotions on the line and then drives them home with music.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    John Turturro brings sensitivity and intelligence to a subject that could have gone terribly awry in Fading Gigolo.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Of all living actresses, only Huppert could capture nuances that alternately elicit sympathy and fierce sexual attraction to a recent stroke victim.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Disguised as a drunken cartwheel through expat paradise, Mark Jarrett’s striking feature juggles questions of mortality along its rowdy cross-country path.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    With the aid of Johnsen’s doc to overcome the obstacles China has put in his path, Ai’s voice carries louder than ever before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Racy subject aside, the film provides a good-humored yet serious-minded look at sexual self-liberation, thick with references to art, music, religion and literature, even as it pushes the envelope with footage of acts previously relegated to the sphere of pornography.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    It’s one thing to declare sex a fact of life and insist that audiences confront their unease at seeing it depicted (or, equally constructive, their intense excitation at its mere mention), but quite another to fashion a fictional woman’s life around nothing but sex. As courageously depicted by Gainsbourg, Jo is ultimately a tragic character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Pavich does an admirable job tracking down surviving parties (except for the suspicious-sounding cast), opting for a humorous rather than indignant tone to the interviews.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Helmer Lenny Abrahamson (“Garage,” “Adam & Paul”) puts the pic’s eccentricity to good use, luring in skeptics with jokey surrealism and delivering them to a profoundly moving place.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Using Baltimore’s dirt-bike groups as its entry point, the film offers a remarkable grassroots look at how the system is broken at the inner-city level.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Everything about the three principal teens registers as deserving of “human interest” to Rich Hill’s two helmers, whose generous attitude draws us into this deeply empathetic film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Phil Lord and Christopher Miller irreverently deconstruct the state of the modern blockbuster and deliver a smarter, more satisfying experience in its place, emerging with a fresh franchise for others to build upon.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Best known as the screenwriter of such subtext-rich adaptations as “The Wings of the Dove” and “Drive,” Amini excels at conveying the subtle, unspoken tensions between characters, selecting a tightrope-risky example with which to make his directorial debut and orchestrating it with aplomb.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The pic owes its believability to Asser, who served as a therapist similar to Oliver’s character, drawing from his experience to shape the world. Asser brings more than just realism, however, crafting the central father-son relationship on the foundation of classical Greek tragedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Meticulously acted, gorgeously shot and hilariously insightful about the strange, inarticulable ways people can get on one another’s nerves, this psychological thriller takes its premise to surprising, darkly comic extremes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The humor springs either from real-world recognition, as Robespierre and her co-writers go where others fear to tread, or in response to the cast’s lively, eccentrically lived-in characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Unlike other actor-directors, Jones never seems to indulge excess on the part of his cast. Though the characters are strong, the performances are understated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This day-in-the-life indie says something profound about an entire generation simply by watching a feckless young man try to figure it out.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The story distinguishes itself from other anime offerings through its attention to both visual and emotional realism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Despite all that it withholds, The Strange Little Cat ultimately proves a far more revealing form of family portrait.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A spunky yet surprisingly sad portrait of a sexually liberated man held captive by his past, forever chasing and trying to rewrite his own legend.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    The result looks as much like a Natural History Museum diorama as it sounds: a respectful but waxy re-creation that feels somehow awe-inspiring yet chillingly lifeless to behold, the great exception being Jones' alternately blistering and sage turn as Stevens.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Though named after a party girl's pet Chihuahua, Starlet could just as easily describe the two exceptional first-timers making their debuts in this brittle, beautifully understated San Fernando Valley character study.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    The cops play things as dirty as the crooks in Gangster Squad, an impressively pulpy underworld-plunger that embellishes on a 1949 showdown between a dedicated team of LAPD officers and Mob-connected Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn) for control of the city.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Entertaining, though conventionally told war story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Fortunately, writer-director Richard LaGravenese has jettisoned most of the novel and refashioned its core mythology and characters into a feverishly enjoyable guilty pleasure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Offsetting stiff acting with rich atmosphere, visuals and music, this long-awaited picture hits the novel's key plot points without denying its spiritual soul.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    A trippy variation on the dream-within-a-dream movie, Boyle’s return-to-form crimer constantly challenges what audiences think they know, but neglects to establish why they should care.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    As the work of one young man bursting with inspiration, the film is a giddy thing to absorb, allowing complete strangers to witness someone performing open-heart surgery on himself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Audiences may not care about this gang when the party starts, but once the dust settles, you’ve gotta admit, they made for pretty good company.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Gordon-Levitt’s script can be a bit on-the-nose at times, but that’s an indulgence easily forgiven in a debut feature, and this ensemble winningly sells the movie’s tricky tonal mix.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    While not quite as charming or unique as the original, Despicable Me 2 comes awfully close.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Breaking it down, The Heat has been engineered to deliver the laughs, and the result certainly does, despite coming alarmingly near to botching the procedural elements along the way.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Here, the laughs come not from the silly voices but a blend of snappy editing and clever character bits, including a recurring joke about an inappropriately named sidekick who calls himself White Shadow (Michael Patrick Bell).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    The director commissioned Struzan to paint the one-sheet for his debut, “Sexina: Popstar P.I.,” and while this sophomore effort is no masterpiece, it’s far more deserving of Struzan’s talent.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    [A] slick, smarter-than-usual conspiracy yarn.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    To the extent that Adele’s hunger for affection resonates with audiences, what emerges is a powerful — if implausible — romance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Much like a work of art, the film invites a range of reactions, though it’s far easier to process than the daubs, doodles and other weird works that now hang all over the country.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Shepard balances a livelier-than-life script with striking, super-saturated images, which makes the film feel bigger than it is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    While Palo Alto doesn’t seem to be saying anything new exactly, it boasts a clear and confident voice of its own, and it will be exciting to see where the young Coppola goes from here.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Affectionately captures the tail end of a culture in which specialized dice, character sheets and hand-painted figurines were the gateway to elaborate flights of imagination.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Ultimately, the enigmatic surface conflict — in which a man must contend with his own carbon copy as rival — proves to be the film’s own worst enemy, for its dark, David Lynchian allure proves almost too compelling, obscuring the material’s deeper themes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    What Erica Rivinoja, John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein’s script lacks in lingering nutritional value, it compensates for with amusing food puns. If nothing else, the pic’s zany tone and manic pace are good for a quick-hit sugar high.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Instead of explaining the system through conventional narration, which would have been extremely helpful, the filmmakers immerse auds in the world they found, capturing its subjects’ behavior with startling candor.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    It may not be balanced or especially sophisticated filmmaking, suffering from a misty-eyed oversimplification of what relationships (gay or straight) actually demand. But for many, it’s precisely the sort of emotional eye-opener needed for young people to find inspiration and naysayers to reconsider their attitudes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    An impressive, thought-provoking astro-adventure that benefits from the biggest screen available.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Hoogendijk has created an artifact that, while not exactly elegant, 400 years hence may prove as vital a window into Amsterdam culture as any of the Dutch masterpieces hanging in the museum itself.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Perhaps the cleverest thing about Barker-Froyland’s delicately contrived debut is how uncontrived she manages to make it seem.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    It’s naughty, campy and wildly uneven.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Awful Nice carves out all the touchy-feely stuff that makes Judd Apatow movies run two reels too long in favor of a jump-cut style that eliminates the fat and keeps the jokes coming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    It Follows is remarkably effective for most of its running time, ratcheting up the tension, then stinging the audience periodically with one of those jolts that sends everyone levitating a couple inches above their seats. But the excitement wears off after a point.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Though virtually every twist on this emotional roller coaster feels preordained by its architect, the director leaves certain mysteries for the audience to interpret, making for a more open-ended and mature work all around.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Writer-director Brian Savelson drags four characters all the way out to the woods to orchestrate the sort of politely confrontational chamber piece best suited to an Off Off Broadway stage in In Our Nature, an eloquent but overly rehearsed drama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Jackson and his team seem compelled to flesh out the world of their earlier trilogy in scenes that would be better left to extended-edition DVDs (or omitted entirely), all but failing to set up a compelling reason for fans to return for the second installment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Considering how graphic Campos is willing to be, "restrained" may not the right word for his approach, and yet Simon Killer withholds so much that some amount of frustration is sure to follow.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    It's nice to have actors of Sarandon and Pepper's caliber onboard for the office-bound wheeler-dealer scenes, but mostly, it's the prospect of witnessing Johnson at the helm of an 18-wheeler as he rams his way through machine-gun fire that excites.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The story of a teen desperate for a father figure who finds encouragement from a wild-and-crazy water-park employee -- rather than from the guy auditioning to be his stepdad -- can be explosively funny in parts, but overall feels pretty familiar, relying more on its cast than the material to win favor.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Promising crude straight-boy humor, but delivering sensitive buddy moments and tons of male nudity, this by-the-numbers gut-buster looks slick, moves fast and packs enough laughs to enliven spring-break receipts and earn its helmers more work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The conflict at the core of the WikiLeaks saga is dramatically lacking.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Despite the inherent perversity of the concept, Mosley succeeds in maintaining a certain sweetness throughout. Even more impressively, she makes her low-budget enterprise look as slick as most midrange studio comedies, demonstrating herself a director with both imagination and technical ingenuity.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    A debut effort that occasionally bogs down in its own symbolism.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Director D.J. Caruso offers a practical solution to the issue of adolescent bullying, as its two young protags respond to a case of vicious hazing not with despair or retaliation, but through teamwork and character-building.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    There’s something decidedly old-fashioned — and also dull as ditchwater — about Jonathan Teplitzky’s retelling of events.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Rather than channeling James Thurber’s satirical tone, Stiller plays it mostly earnest, spinning what feels like a feature-length “Just Do It” ad.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Like too many of Sayles’ films, Go for Sisters seems bound to slip through the cracks, not quite memorable enough to make a lasting impression.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Jeremy Lovering’s tense debut might have worked better had it left more to the imagination. Still, crisp camerawork and amplified sound yield paranoia aplenty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Clearly, Wheatley is bored with the paint-by-numbers approach of his horror contemporaries, but has swung so far in the opposite direction here, the result feels almost amateurishly avant garde at times, guilty of the sort of indulgences one barely tolerates in student films.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    This more broadly appealing project feels daringly frank on the subject of sex. But as is frequently the case with the most saturnalian comedies, it’s actually quite conservative when it comes to allowing its characters to follow through on their uninhibited talk.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    While more coherent than much of Anderson’s recent work, the film proves less successful at combining destruction and damsel-in-distress storytelling within the same frame, serving up blurry images of Milo trying to rescue Cassia while the city crumbles around them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The idea here isn’t to titillate with tawdry teen hormones, but to offer an outlet for all that mental distress young people take on while trying to find their place in the world.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Ida
    It’s one thing to set up a striking black-and-white composition and quite another to draw people into it, and dialing things back as much as this film does risks losing the vast majority of viewers along the way, offering an intellectual exercise in lieu of an emotional experience to all but the most rarefied cineastes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Edwards seems to have miscalculated our investment in his cast...simultaneously underestimating how satisfying some good old-fashioned monster-on-MUTO action can be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    More sensitive than sensational, Candler’s debut doesn’t add much in the way of insight to the juvenile delinquency genre, but boasts a stunning breakthrough performance from newcomer Josh Wiggins as the troublemaker in question.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    There’s really only one ingredient for which The Salvation is likely to be remembered: Eva Green.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The film all too eagerly allows itself to be taken in by Payne’s charms, trying to capture her human side via interviews with her two grown children, while all but ignoring the all-too-obvious cautionary aspect in favor of escapist entertainment.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Suitable for teens — lies somewhere between indignant expose and unusually tasteful exploitation picture, with shower scenes and sweaty young delinquents aplenty.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    What's missing cast-wise is an appealing personality in the sidekick role, and Webb is no match for Mads Mikkelsen.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Reacher is a brawny action figure whose exploits would have been a good fit for the likes of Arnold Schwarzenegger or Sylvester Stallone back in the day, but feel less fun when delegated to a leading man like Tom Cruise. The star is too charismatic to play someone so cold-blooded, and his fans likely won't appreciate the stretch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Strong on texture but taxingly light on narrative.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    With Identity Thief, Melissa McCarthy proves she's got what it takes to carry a feature, however meager the underlying material.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Willis still packs that rapscallion charm, balancing his wisecracking, reluctant-hero shtick with the unstoppable, all-American quality that earned the original film its title. But the chemistry between him and Courtney is nonexistent, with the younger thesp, who makes co-star Cole Hauser look expressive, adding so little to the equation, one can only hope the studio doesn't plan to pass the franchise on to him.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The comedy feels forced as Fey works overtime to insert unnecessary zingers at the tail of every scene. If the cast weren’t so endearing, her actions could easily sour an audience on the whole experience, and Admission digs itself a hole only an ensemble this appealing can escape.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    A North Korean terrorist may be responsible for taking the president hostage, but it’s Bulgarian-made CGI that does the most damage in Antoine Fuqua’s intense, ugly, White-House-under-siege actioner Olympus Has Fallen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Two half-stories about fathers and sons on opposite sides of the law do not a full movie make in The Place Beyond the Pines, the overlong and under-conceived reunion between “Blue Valentine” director Derek Cianfrance and lookalike star Ryan Gosling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    It’s a vibrant journey, but not a terribly illuminating one.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Violet & Daisy feels radically disconnected from recognizable human behavior.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Though Resnais’ gamble seems to have failed, it’s encouraging to see a director on the brink of 90 still willing to experiment in a way most helmers half his age wouldn’t dare.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    More irrelevant than irreverent, the unworthy script from “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure’s” Chris Matheson might play to apocalyptically stoned college kids, but offers nothing in the way of broader social satire, suggesting the waste of a perfectly good Reckoning — not to mention the talents of a cast far funnier than the doom-and-gloom results suggest.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Trading her improv-based filmmaking style for a more traditional screenplay-grounded model, Lynn Shelton delivers an uneven mix of half-formed conflicts.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Collectively, Thanks for Sharing boasts more than enough personalities to keep things interesting, but it lacks the casual spontaneity to make these characters’ journeys anything other than predictable.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    An epic showcase for mediocre CGI and slapdash screenwriting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    In angling for suspense, this low-budget stunt relies a bit too heavily on our suspension of disbelief.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    A scrappy portrait of half a dozen renegade gold-diggers.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Visually, “Walking With Dinosaurs” dazzles with its combination of Animal Logic-animated CG creatures...and beautiful practical backgrounds... Less dazzling is the constant stream of jokey banter, which thwarts the pic’s educational potential and caps its target age awfully low.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Neither Pena nor the pic itself delivers the necessary dynamism, strained by a modest budget and too few extras to sufficiently re-create a movement that found strength in numbers.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Maps struggles to mix its various genres: Part showbiz sendup, part ghost story, part dysfunctional-family drama, the movie instead comes across as so much jaded mumbo-jumbo.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Ultimately, such a stir-crazy two-hander can only be as interesting as its actors.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    This overly devout adaptation of Joe Hill’s sacrilegious text benefits from the helmer’s twisted sensibility, but suffers from a case of overall silliness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    With even less plot than in previous installments to get in the way of its inventive 3D dance scenes, this fifth pic delivers on spectacle... but lacks in chemistry.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    There's a reason creepy character actors seldom play lead, and Karpovsky's amusingly off-kilter quality is better suited to the background, while Prediger (as the stranger he desperately wants to ditch, lest his ex-g.f. discover his infidelity) has the makings of an indie star.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Potter seems at a loss to communicate the ideas behind her agonizingly elliptical picture, leaving auds to marvel at the gorgeous cinematography and scarlet-red hair of its heroine, earnestly played by Elle Fanning in a project undeserving of her talents.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Emperor’s bloodless presentation fails on a fundamental dramatic level, playing like the fancy version of a junior-high educational filmstrip, down to the false suspense of Alex Heffes’ corny ticking-clock score.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Firth and Blunt make a strange couple, and Ariola a musicvideo helmer making his feature debut, should have devoted more time to making the chemistry work than to sustaining the melancholy mood.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Relative to the major brands, the intimate, handcrafted approach should yield more flavor. Instead, Drinking Buddies offers mostly froth.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The film isn’t so much funny as it is merely amusing — a laundry list of inappropriate and potentially embarrassing moments that strive mightily, but never quite manage to land the laugh.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Plop plop. Fizz fizz. Oh, what a missed opportunity it is! In the well-cast but seldom funny satire And Now a Word From Our Sponsor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Apart from its general knock against ageism in Hollywood, The Congress doesn’t have much insight to offer on the subject.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Extravagant but exhausting...this over-the-top oater delivers all the energy and spectacle audiences have come to expect from a Jerry Bruckheimer production, but sucks out the fun in the process,
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    As first features go, A Teacher demonstrates a willingness to provoke, but doesn’t seem to understand the minimum expectations most audiences place on films in terms of both incident and characterization.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Decently acted despite screenplay shortcomings.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    One dead giveaway that the comedy isn’t working is the film’s score, which overcompensates throughout by attempting to bolster every second with bouncy energy.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Cody shows promise as a director, paving over the bumpy patches with clever song choices, but needs to mix things up if she hopes to continue.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    As the years go by and the kids grow — perhaps the only real benefit of Winterbottom’s approach — time begins to run together, making it all too easy for the mind to wander.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    It is, in short, everything you’d expect from a crowd-sourced documentary, designed to celebrate its subject, while mostly just validating the aesthetic taste of its backers.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    This off-putting pic requires open minds and iron nerves.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    As impressive as these visual elements prove to be, the film struggles to grab and maintain audiences’ interest, whether or not they know the underlying legend by heart.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The critters look cute, but behave less so, while the competing-heists concept never quite takes off.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    The film amounts to a lousy sort of magic show, schematically pulling strings to prove its own points.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    Happy Christmas desperately needs some real jokes, rather than settling for the bemused chuckles that accompany its banal observations into human nature.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Debruge
    As horror scenarios go, Puenzo’s setup takes the most heavy-handed approach possible.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    The wallpaper emotes more than Ryan Gosling does in Only God Forgives, an exercise in supreme style and minimal substance.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Even the hackiest of Hollywood writers would have known how to fix its considerable script problems.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Lambert brings a forlorn dimension to his seductive young role, but Bell never really convinces as the older woman. Despite flirting with controversy, the actress seems reluctant to plunge fully into potential unlikability, nor does the film quite give her the chance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Granted, Landesman feels an obligation to history, but there’s something ponderously obvious about the way so many of these scenes are played.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Chemistry you can fake, but charm is far harder to pull off, and Baggage Claim never quite succeeds on that front.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Fancy-sounding dialogue and handsome widescreen lensing goes only so far to disguise the shallowness of the underlying material.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    The script is nearly all dialogue, including several eloquent spoken passages toward the end, but it’s a lousy story, ineptly constructed and rendered far too difficult to follow.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    This been-there-done-that story marks a pretty banal debut for writer-director Alain Marie, who seems far more interested in aping Refn and early-career Michael Mann than in finding his own style.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Debruge
    Though much of the script borders on unbearable, compounded by “Juno” composer Mateo Messina’s tell-you-how-to-feel score, writer Daniel Taplitz manages to sneak in some poignant self-help aphorisms here and there.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    The cross-dressing "Madea" star seems out of his depth playing the hard-boiled detective made famous by Morgan Freeman in "Along Came a Spider" and "Kiss the Girls." Even action helmer Rob Cohen ("The Fast and the Furious," "XXX") seems to be off his game here.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    If nonchalance were an Olympic sport, Max would be a gold medalist, and watching Somebody Up There Likes Me is about as much fun as being a spectator at that event might sound.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    As Scandi directors go, Niels Arden Oplev couldn’t be hotter. After putting his stamp on “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” the Dane has what appears to be his pick of projects. So why follow it up with such revenge-fantasy dreck as Dead Man Down, a derivative collection of brazen plot holes and latenight-cable cliches into which he drags “Dragon” star Noomi Rapace?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    This sloppy, button-pushing black comedy reveals a crew desperately in need of counseling — less in anger management than in the fundamentals of screenwriting, camerawork and structure.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    A partly authentic, partly scripted behind-the-scenes featurette that never quite conveys the star’s “high/curious” interest in all things taboo.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Debruge
    It’s worse than tacky, trivializing depression for a handful of easy laughs and pop-psychology platitudes.