Peter Debruge

Select another critic »
For 668 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 Pretty Persuasion
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 85 out of 668
668 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    In keeping with Gitai’s typically austere oeuvre, it’s a long, slow and sober piece — one could even call it a documentary, despite the fact that actors have been hired to perform deposition scenes derived directly from Shamgar transcripts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Like too many of Sayles’ films, Go for Sisters seems bound to slip through the cracks, not quite memorable enough to make a lasting impression.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Politics aside, however, the movie delivers on the inspiration of its premise, featuring just the sort of laughs one hopes for.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The Wave sticks mostly to the big-studio formula (albeit on a much smaller budget), introducing a handful of bland soon-to-be-victims before bombarding them with spectacular digital effects.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Beatty tries hard to re-create the look and feel of late-’50s Hollywood as it existed both on-screen and off, aided by DP Caleb Deschanel and terrific costume and set contributions. And yet, it actually comes off too conservative for its own time, with stiff performances from Collins and Ehrenreich.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Having learned a thing or two from Baz Luhrmann, Almereyda substitutes guns for daggers and picks his locations carefully, creating a rich, sultry-looking environment within which to stage the drama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    This more broadly appealing project feels daringly frank on the subject of sex. But as is frequently the case with the most saturnalian comedies, it’s actually quite conservative when it comes to allowing its characters to follow through on their uninhibited talk.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Rather than presenting a nuanced ending that’s open to interpretation, Barrett simply leaves us scratching our heads as to what just happened.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Though Felicioli and Gagnol’s visuals suggest colorful kidlit illustrations come to life, their labor-intensive style isn’t for everyone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Where the film goes is both unexpected and necessary, since however grounded and relatable these thinly detailed characters might be, the movie doesn’t actually seem to be going anywhere.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Jackson and his team seem compelled to flesh out the world of their earlier trilogy in scenes that would be better left to extended-edition DVDs (or omitted entirely), all but failing to set up a compelling reason for fans to return for the second installment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Racing Extinction tends to be far more effective when presenting its enlightened activists as heroes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Rats is that rare breed of nature doc, one designed not to foster greater empathy for a misunderstood species, but rather to exploit our preexisting fears of the filthy critters in question.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    What the movie lacks in originality it makes up for in personality, as Kosturos brings the kind of rare alchemy to the role of Ali that makes all present feel as if they’re watching the birth of a movie star.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The conflict at the core of the WikiLeaks saga is dramatically lacking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Edwards seems to have miscalculated our investment in his cast...simultaneously underestimating how satisfying some good old-fashioned monster-on-MUTO action can be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The shattering of one’s noble ideals is a delicate thing to capture on film, and White plays the moment of rupture with a banality that threatens to undermine our faith in her as storyteller more than in the system itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The idea here isn’t to titillate with tawdry teen hormones, but to offer an outlet for all that mental distress young people take on while trying to find their place in the world.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Though the slow-boil chemistry is there, the script feels flat, content to rely on the surface friction between its lead actors, rather than creating scenes in which we can really get to know the pair’s respective personalities before testing their limits in the field.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Amusing as the Cooties script manages to be, one gets the distinct impression that its authors didn’t bother to visit a school at any point in the research or writing process, missing out on any number of jokes they could have made at public education’s expense.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    This reunion between Kristen Stewart and the director who gave her one of her best-ever roles in 2014’s “Clouds of Sils Maria” is a broken, but never boring mix of spine-tingling horror story, dreary workplace drama and elliptical identity search, likely to go down as one of the most divisive films of Stewart’s career.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    What the film lacks in originality, it makes up for via its star’s naturally glamor-resistant sensibility, giving us an unpolished glimpse into the personal life of a professional runner.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Clearly, Wheatley is bored with the paint-by-numbers approach of his horror contemporaries, but has swung so far in the opposite direction here, the result feels almost amateurishly avant garde at times, guilty of the sort of indulgences one barely tolerates in student films.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Though relatively conservative in its approach, Lars Kraume’s teleplay-style treatment of a still-touchy subject has the nerve to name names.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    A debut effort that occasionally bogs down in its own symbolism.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The script never quite succeeds in making us care about Allan as a character (despite dubbing its quavering narration into English for the ease of American auds), but it finds an interesting balance for a personality who leaves a trail of disaster in his wake.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    While Lautner is to be admired for his physical commitment to the role, the below-the-line team lighting, shooting and choreographing his moves deserves equal credit. The film wouldn’t have worked without such a versatile team, which otherwise operates without a trace.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    As heroines go, it’s refreshing to get one as complex as this: When psychologically scarred female characters do turn up in thrillers, they’re usually little more than shivering victims who set a group of male cops in motion, but here, Libby does her own detective work, while Hendricks lends star power to the flashback scenes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Trumbo may be clumsy and overly simplistic at times, but it’s still an important reminder of how democracy can fail (that is, when a fervent majority turns on those with different and potentially threatening values), and the strength of character it takes to fight the system.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    More sensitive than sensational, Candler’s debut doesn’t add much in the way of insight to the juvenile delinquency genre, but boasts a stunning breakthrough performance from newcomer Josh Wiggins as the troublemaker in question.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Something about working with Pacino forces what could have been a breaks-the-mold character portrait into factory-made territory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    There’s really only one ingredient for which The Salvation is likely to be remembered: Eva Green.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Writer-director Brian Savelson drags four characters all the way out to the woods to orchestrate the sort of politely confrontational chamber piece best suited to an Off Off Broadway stage in In Our Nature, an eloquent but overly rehearsed drama.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Suitable for teens — lies somewhere between indignant expose and unusually tasteful exploitation picture, with shower scenes and sweaty young delinquents aplenty.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Cavill and Hammer have each toplined major tentpoles before, so it’s something of a mystery why neither makes much of an impression here, but there’s a curious vacuum at the center of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. that almost certainly owes to its casting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Written raggedly enough for the actors to bring their own chemistry to what aspirationally feels like one of Robert Altman’s backstage dramas (a la “Nashville” or “Ready to Wear”), Magic Mike XXL is most fun when it isn’t trying to justify itself, but just kicking back with the guys — or better yet, giving them a fresh excuse to show off their creativity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Without sacrificing the piece‘s warm comic undertones, this minimally adapted theatrical piece remains richer and far more thought-provoking than a typical night at the movies — if only the entire cast were as strong as Stewart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Benefiting enormously from its evocative Sicilian setting, this widescreen experience makes bewitching use of space, time and sound, creating an almost meditative atmosphere in which patient-minded auds might respond to its themes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Certain images...leave lasting impressions, though Garciadiego’s script doesn’t seem to do enough with the story, other than laying it out in linear order for Ripstein to film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The film all too eagerly allows itself to be taken in by Payne’s charms, trying to capture her human side via interviews with her two grown children, while all but ignoring the all-too-obvious cautionary aspect in favor of escapist entertainment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Though undeniably gorgeous, it is punishingly long, frequently boring, and woefully unengaging at some of its most critical moments.... Still, viewed through the narrow prism of films about faith, Silence is a remarkable achievement.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Promising crude straight-boy humor, but delivering sensitive buddy moments and tons of male nudity, this by-the-numbers gut-buster looks slick, moves fast and packs enough laughs to enliven spring-break receipts and earn its helmers more work.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The entire scenario, contrived to within an inch of its life, takes Poelvoorde’s appeal for granted. Marc’s anxiety becomes our own once he realizes what he’s done, though Jacquot makes it much more compelling to watch his characters fall in love than it is to see them writhe and twist amid its complications.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Rather than channeling James Thurber’s satirical tone, Stiller plays it mostly earnest, spinning what feels like a feature-length “Just Do It” ad.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    There’s something decidedly old-fashioned — and also dull as ditchwater — about Jonathan Teplitzky’s retelling of events.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Edmands maintains too measured a pace as he cycles through the various lives affected, to the extent that one begins to wonder when things will start kick in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    In tapping Satrapi to interpret this project, the producers have done about as well as one could expect with such material. Still, a bit more consistency in style would have gone a long way.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Ida
    It’s one thing to set up a striking black-and-white composition and quite another to draw people into it, and dialing things back as much as this film does risks losing the vast majority of viewers along the way, offering an intellectual exercise in lieu of an emotional experience to all but the most rarefied cineastes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Unimaginative and downright predictable by grownup standards, but bursting with elements sure to appeal to younger auds.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Simultaneously clever and exasperating, the film puts a novel spin on the genre Roger Ebert dubbed “the Dead Teenager Movie.”
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Herzog’s script loses its way in the desert at one point, dutifully chronicling a life whose principal conflicts are a bit too abstract to dramatize. In the end, it’s not clear what’s driving Bell, nor what’s holding her back.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    It's nice to have actors of Sarandon and Pepper's caliber onboard for the office-bound wheeler-dealer scenes, but mostly, it's the prospect of witnessing Johnson at the helm of an 18-wheeler as he rams his way through machine-gun fire that excites.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    The story of a teen desperate for a father figure who finds encouragement from a wild-and-crazy water-park employee -- rather than from the guy auditioning to be his stepdad -- can be explosively funny in parts, but overall feels pretty familiar, relying more on its cast than the material to win favor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Considering how graphic Campos is willing to be, "restrained" may not the right word for his approach, and yet Simon Killer withholds so much that some amount of frustration is sure to follow.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Rather than linger on the project’s shortcomings, which only disappoint relative to the story’s incredible creative potential, it should be said that in partnership with Berla, Malzieu has created a fully realized, wildly imaginative storybook world and populated it with eccentric characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    It cuts to the heart of the self-doubt, fear and prejudice associated with modern homosexuality.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    While more coherent than much of Anderson’s recent work, the film proves less successful at combining destruction and damsel-in-distress storytelling within the same frame, serving up blurry images of Milo trying to rescue Cassia while the city crumbles around them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    What little dimension Maudie offers is a direct result of Hawkins’ contributions, which draw from her character’s past to add texture to her performance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Jeremy Lovering’s tense debut might have worked better had it left more to the imagination. Still, crisp camerawork and amplified sound yield paranoia aplenty.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Given the escalating ambition of Noe’s oeuvre and the pornographic promo materials teased in advance of the pic’s Cannes premiere, who would have thought that Love would ultimately prove to be Noe’s tamest film?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Director D.J. Caruso offers a practical solution to the issue of adolescent bullying, as its two young protags respond to a case of vicious hazing not with despair or retaliation, but through teamwork and character-building.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The film is a snarl of contradictions, starting with the discrepancy between Mann’s obsessive demand for realism and the consistently implausible screenplay.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The movie deprives us of either a tragic villain or a sympathetic lead, hoping that its grab bag of squirm-inducing details — dental drills, stillborn livestock, flesh-eating eels — will suffice, when in fact, they reveal how a shorter, tighter treatment ought to have done the trick.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    This is precisely the type of moviegoing experience engineered for those who still get a laugh when the Baha Men hit "Who Let the Dogs Out?" accompanies a doggie mayhem montage.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    While this Kid isn't up to "Spy Kids" standards, the good news is the film hews closer to the high-concept kids' movies of the 1980s than to all that Disney Channel goo that's been repackaged for the big screen lately.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The entire movie rides on Paul Kaye's performance.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Imagine what someone like Danny DeVito might have done with the material, taking it in that darker "War of the Roses" direction instead of languishing in this sunny, not-nearly-sinister-enough "Legally Blonde" territory.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    A filmmaker like John Sayles ("Sunshine State") who shares Hiaasen's issue-conscious outlook might have framed the lesson a bit more eloquently. But Shriner blows it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    If you were hoping to find another "Nemo," you're likely to be let down by this insincere and borderline unpleasant alternative.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Visually, “Walking With Dinosaurs” dazzles with its combination of Animal Logic-animated CG creatures...and beautiful practical backgrounds... Less dazzling is the constant stream of jokey banter, which thwarts the pic’s educational potential and caps its target age awfully low.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The lack of a single clear character with whom to identify ultimately proves problematic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    All told, in giving parents nothing to object to, director Alexs Stadermann (who got his start making straight-to-video sequels for Disney) has also given them little to get excited about, apart from the idea of sharing Maya with another generation of preschoolers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Unlike this summer's compulsively watchable "Hustle & Flow," Get Rich or Die Tryin' captures none of the thrill of finding your voice, recording a demo or landing a concert.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    If nothing else, You I Love delivers a brisk and spirited little taste of contemporary Russian culture through the eyes of three spontaneous, unpredictable and oddly charming characters.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Look past the gimmick, and all that remains is an overly arty study of a lopsided marriage in which super-attentive husband James (Jason Clarke) actually seems to prefer when his wife Gina (Blake Lively) can’t see — and another opportunity for Lively to prove that she’s more than just a pretty face.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Haley and Basch have mistaken what the AARP calls “movies for grownups” for a kind of mushy feel-good pablum, throwing together a handful of familiar clichés in the hope that Elliott’s charm will carry the day.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Though colorfully embellished with authentic detail and logistically complex to bring to the screen, Ayer’s script is bland at the most basic story level, undermined by cardboard characterizations and a stirring yet transparently silly climactic showdown.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Though no one would accuse The Bronze of not being funny, it somehow manages not to be funny often enough.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    We’ve heard the same lesson countless times before in other movies, and though it’s certainly impressive to see Conor’s anxieties manifest themselves in such a stunning Ent-like being, as monsters go, Bayona’s creation is all bark and no bite.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Basically the first movie all over again, with plenty more of the bridge-jumping, rocket-launching action that audiences loved about the original.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    The trouble is that for all the narrative intrigue and excitement such an endeavor might suggest, director Sean Ellis’ less-than-dramatic recreation of this daring act of defiance proves surprisingly stiff...barely redeemed by an even more surprisingly intense finale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Strong on texture but taxingly light on narrative.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    It would seem Towne is too much in love with the book to recognize its fundamental limitations as a film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    There's a lot to be said for a movie that isn't after instant fame, but only wants to make audiences feel good.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    One of the great pleasures of the original Love Bug comes in watching all the live-action stunts, and CG just isn't the same.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    A mobster movie without whackings, a thriller without suspense and a courtroom drama without resolution, this turgid retelling of an unsolved missing-persons case functions mostly as a portrait of a young woman who loved too passionately and the manipulative creep incapable of reciprocating her affections.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Their movie is cold, and I mean that not as a weather pun, but in the sense that it's impossible to warm up to a character who sees the awful things happening around him strictly in terms of how they affect him.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    This is superficial entertainment to say the least. But if you're looking for laughs, then Just Friends is just fine.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    From its opening scene, the film feels desaturated and airless, as if the intrusion of energy or color might upset the characters’ delicate task of healing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    In angling for suspense, this low-budget stunt relies a bit too heavily on our suspension of disbelief.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    American audiences have seen Ju-On. And The Grudge just goes to show why remaking it is such a frivolous idea: What's the use in wasting so much energy if the filmmakers aren't going to fix what was wrong with the movie in the first place?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Almost certain to polarize audiences, this bit of emotional agitprop plays like a watered-down "Short Cuts" or "Magnolia" with a shrill, one-note message: We're all a little bit racist.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Borderline reprehensible, High Tension is a living nightmare, but then, why else would you see it?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    These two are meant to be together, as the film’s clever title suggests, though all the truly interesting things they accomplished happen only after that reunion.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    One of those slow-baked Southern character studies about taking an old flat tire of a man and finding some way to love him anyway.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Whereas E.B. White's beloved novel introduced kids to the cycle of life, tenderly broaching the tricky subject of mortality, this latest movie version plays like just another piece of vegetarian agitprop.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    This inventive family movie sets up the most delightful premise, then squanders it on the kind of yawn-inducing CG adventure you might expect from one of those long, plot-heavy cut scenes that slow down video games.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    While both funnier and scarier than Ivan Reitman’s 1984 original, this otherwise over-familiar remake from “Bridesmaids” director Paul Feig doesn’t do nearly enough to innovate on what has come before.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    With Identity Thief, Melissa McCarthy proves she's got what it takes to carry a feature, however meager the underlying material.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Debruge
    Coolidge knows he's not making "Death of a Salesman" here (he names the store managers Glen Gary and Glen Ross in tribute to David Mamet's elegy to the American Dream), but he's got the same eye for detail that made "Office Space" great. What he lacks is Arthur Miller's (or even Mike Judge's) sense for character.

Top Trailers