Peter Debruge

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For 679 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence
Lowest review score: 0 Another Gay Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 85 out of 679
679 movie reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    With Boyhood, Linklater has created an uncanny time capsule, inviting auds to relive their own upbringing through a series of artificial memories pressed like flowers between the pages of a family photo album.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    A socially conscious work of art as essential as it is insightful.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Even as he beguiles us with mystery, Guadagnino recreates Elio’s life-changing summer with such intensity that we might as well be experiencing it first-hand. It’s a rare gift that earns him a place in the pantheon alongside such masters of sensuality as Pedro Amodóvar and François Ozon, while putting “Call Me by Your Name” on par with the best of their work.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Though the film brims with memorable characters, the show ultimately belongs to Ejiofor, who upholds the character’s dignity throughout.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Far more ambitious than "The Hurt Locker," yet nowhere near so tripwire-tense, this procedure-driven, decade-spanning docudrama nevertheless rivets for most of its running time.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    In execution, Pixar’s 15th feature proves to be the greatest idea the toon studio has ever had: a stunningly original concept that will not only delight and entertain the company’s massive worldwide audience, but also promises to forever change the way people think about the way people think, delivering creative fireworks grounded by a wonderfully relatable family story.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Considering Haneke's confrontational past, this poignantly acted, uncommonly tender two-hander makes a doubly powerful statement about man's capacity for dignity and sensitivity when confronted with the inevitable cruelty of nature.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    What City of Ghosts does best is to humanize those who’ve suffered most from the conflict in Syria, educating us through both outrage and compassion.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    This is the director’s most accessible and naturalistic film, using everyday characters to test how well modern-day Russia is maintaining the social contract with its citizens.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Debruge
    Ida
    It’s one thing to set up a striking black-and-white composition and quite another to draw people into it, and dialing things back as much as this film does risks losing the vast majority of viewers along the way, offering an intellectual exercise in lieu of an emotional experience to all but the most rarefied cineastes.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Had James Thurber worked in animation, the waggish result might look and sound a bit like It’s Such a Beautiful Day, indie cartoonist Don Hertzfeldt’s alternately poignant and absurdist triptych.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Never before has anyone made a documentary like The Act of Killing, and the filmmakers seem at a loss in terms of how to organize the many threads of what they capture...Still, essential and enraging, The Act of Killing is a film that begs to be seen, then never watched again.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    While Lowery’s actual method of delivery may not be scary, it’s sure to haunt those who open themselves up to the experience.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    In another director’s hands, the residents might be labeled “eccentric” and condescendingly depicted for laughs, but Ewan McNicol and Anna Sandilands approach this touch-and-go community with curiosity and humanism, capturing what feels like a deciding moment in a series of struggles so far off the grid, they would otherwise escape our notice entirely.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Chazelle proves an exceptional builder of scenes, crafting loaded, need-to-succeed moments that grab our attention and hold it tight.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Anomalisa’s existence is a minor miracle on multiple levels, from the Kickstarter campaign that funded it (the credits give “special thanks” to 1,070 names) to the oh-so-delicate way the film creeps up on you, transitioning from a low-key dark night of the soul into something warm, human and surprisingly tender.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    A triumph on every creative level, from casting to execution.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    A robust romantic drama, rich in history and full of emotion, Brooklyn fills a niche in which the studios once specialized, using a well-read and respected novel as the grounds for a tenderly observed tearjerker.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    Rosi has long been drawn to quiet lives, but has never been quite so successful in conveying the soulful qualities he sees in them to his audience — until now, using the oblique approach of Lampedusa’s residents to spotlight this growing international crisis, while using his young protagonist’s obliviousness to reflect and indict our own.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    In his first feature, director Joshua Marston passes no judgments. He doesn't condemn drugs. He merely depicts the system that has arisen to support this illicit trade.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Murderball asks you to put all your assumptions about quadriplegics aside and start over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    Herzog himself is one of the great lunatic directors of our century, a mad genius who repeatedly attempts to challenge nature and the gods in his own films.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Visually stunning even in its most banal moments and emotionally perceptive almost to a fault.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Debruge
    The result looks as much like a Natural History Museum diorama as it sounds: a respectful but waxy re-creation that feels somehow awe-inspiring yet chillingly lifeless to behold, the great exception being Jones' alternately blistering and sage turn as Stevens.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Ira Sachs’ Little Men is a little movie brimming with little truths about modern life. It won’t change the world, but it does understand it
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Debruge
    Michael Dudok de Wit’s hypnotizing, entirely dialogue-free The Red Turtle is a fable so simple, so pure, it feels as if it has existed for hundreds of years, like a brilliant shard of sea glass rendered smooth and elegant through generations of retelling.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    For a director who emerged from indie film’s so-called “mumblecore” movement, Gemini feels like a grown-up achievement, and the sign of a director with so much more to give in the future.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    On one hand, the cartoon is never afraid to be cute, but more importantly, it’s committed to being real.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Debruge
    Song of the Sea is differentiated not only by its rich visual design — grayer and more subdued than “The Secret of Kells,” yet still a marvel to behold — but also by its ethereal musical dimension, another collaboration between composer Bruno Coulais and Irish folk band Kila.

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