For 142 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 The Man on Her Mind
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 83 out of 142
  2. Negative: 24 out of 142
142 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Bernstein communicates Ungerer’s manic spirit and his irrepressible creativity by punctuating the conventions of talking-head interviews and archival footage with animated snippets of Ungerer’s thousands of illustrations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though “Berberian” bogs down a bit in its infernal spiral, Strickland proves himself to be a rising talent — a master of sound and fury both.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Of all the great monster mothers in cinema history, Cornelia Keneres (Luminita Gheorghiu, who sets the standard other performances should be judged by this year) ranks high on the list.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The world of cinema is richer for the voice of Al Mansour; she speaks for the women of her country, and for people everywhere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This sounds like it could be austere and schematic, but the affecting, authentic performances from the first-time actors make these characters thoroughly authentic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the seeming inevitability of tragedy and despair, In Bloom remains true to its title. Though political and personal upheaval threatens to overwhelm them, Eka and Natia’s clarity and courage resist the ignorance, injustice, and rage all around.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A taut, expertly constructed, and suspenseful police procedural, it also explores the issues of loyalty, trust, betrayal, and revenge that those engaged in such morally ambiguous if essential activities would prefer not to think about.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A fresh perspective on one of the world’s longest conflicts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Compared to his previous films, The Dance of Reality offers a nearly coherent narrative and a gentle, reconciliatory tone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The opening and closing scenes of this film evoke those in “Crimson Gold.” They are long shots of the outside as seen through a security gate. In “Crimson Gold,” the view is of a chaotic street in Tehran. Here, it is the empty sea. This difference demonstrates what Panahi has been deprived of, and what the world has lost because of it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The performances ratchet up to giddy near-hysteria, as Hilde toys with Solness’s randiness and repressed memory.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Who knows what they’re fighting about, but given the ecstatic ballet of fists and water, tossed bodies and smashed decor, centered by Leung’s majestic impassivity, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The quest ends in a surprise Capra-esque resolution, which both satisfies and cloys.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like [The Purge and The Conjuring], Adam Wingard’s sly, diabolical, and oddly moral You’re Next draws on the home invasion/haunted house scenario, but outclasses them with its wit, irony, and technically proficient terror.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not known for subtlety, Besson gets the expected laughs, and then some. He also exercises an unwonted finesse, not only with the allusions, but also with variations on the “f” word that, if not poetic, are at least funny.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [Terence Stamp] and Vanessa Redgrave, as well as supporting actors Christopher Eccleston and Gemma Arterton, raise Paul Andrew Williams’s entry in the golden age genre from mawkish to genuinely heartwarming.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than just a footnote to a wayward period of cultural history, The Source Family portrays an American type, the transcendent charlatan, a latter-day Gatsby, not of material riches but of the soul.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    An effusive, sad, visually gorgeous, and illuminating portrait of the artist.