For 204 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 36 out of 204
204 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bonello takes on the point of view of Saint Laurent himself, exposing a visionary world seen from within that is as strange and wonderful as that of a magnificently stitched garment turned inside out.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Such miserable people; why should we care? Maybe because Ceylan does. By staging this petulant misery in a snow-filled world of melancholy, unearthly beauty, he underscores their tragedy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Whether or not Hawke got any answers to his questions about the purpose of being artist, seeking them under the guidance of a teacher like Bernstein resulted in this work of art.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The vividly realized squalor, cruelty, and ugliness engulf everything, including the narrative.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Compared to his previous films, The Dance of Reality offers a nearly coherent narrative and a gentle, reconciliatory tone.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    By the movie’s end, viewers will have had a soul-searing brush with the unthinkable that far exceeds any real horror film of recent memory, and surpasses in its impact more traditional features and documentaries about the subject.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In a way, Lipes’s documentary resembles Jonathan Demme and David Byrne’s “Stop Making Sense” (1984) — in which Byrne goes on stage solo with a beat box and the rest of the Talking Heads gather one by one — as much as it does Wiseman’s films.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though “Berberian” bogs down a bit in its infernal spiral, Strickland proves himself to be a rising talent — a master of sound and fury both.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The world of cinema is richer for the voice of Al Mansour; she speaks for the women of her country, and for people everywhere.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Plympton will be cheated if Cheatin’ doesn’t at least get nominated for a best animated feature Oscar.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Bernstein communicates Ungerer’s manic spirit and his irrepressible creativity by punctuating the conventions of talking-head interviews and archival footage with animated snippets of Ungerer’s thousands of illustrations.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The Mauritanian-born Abderrahmane Sissako, one of the great filmmakers of sub-Saharan Africa, does not need to resort to propaganda in Timbuktu to denounce fanaticism. He has poetry. With subtlety, irony, and even humor, he gradually prepares the viewer for the horror to come.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite his neuroses, VanDyke displays self-awareness and humility, and a charisma that ranges from the goofiness of Owen Wilson to the grandiosity of his hero, Lawrence of Arabia.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    As powerful as it is as social commentary, Gett triumphs most as an examination of human relationships.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It would violate a taboo to relate how this movie magic, masterfully orchestrated by Weinstein and Measom, is done. Their film is as smooth as Randi’s patter and demonstrates how the documentarian’s camera is quicker than the eye.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the seeming inevitability of tragedy and despair, In Bloom remains true to its title. Though political and personal upheaval threatens to overwhelm them, Eka and Natia’s clarity and courage resist the ignorance, injustice, and rage all around.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A 2009 film only now getting theatrical distribution in the United States, it is perhaps Farhadi’s richest, most complex and ambitious.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    I have not seen the film “Fifty Shades of Grey” but I doubt that it evokes the mystery, wit, and eroticism that Peter Strickland’s sumptuously claustrophobic fable of women in love does. All without nudity, bad dialogue, or the requisite wooden acting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A taut, expertly constructed, and suspenseful police procedural, it also explores the issues of loyalty, trust, betrayal, and revenge that those engaged in such morally ambiguous if essential activities would prefer not to think about.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Of all the great monster mothers in cinema history, Cornelia Keneres (Luminita Gheorghiu, who sets the standard other performances should be judged by this year) ranks high on the list.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is a delight for flamenco fans and provides a fascinating introduction for those unfamiliar with the music. But as cinema, despite the lush cinematography of Vittorio Storaro, it is lacking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The opening and closing scenes of this film evoke those in “Crimson Gold.” They are long shots of the outside as seen through a security gate. In “Crimson Gold,” the view is of a chaotic street in Tehran. Here, it is the empty sea. This difference demonstrates what Panahi has been deprived of, and what the world has lost because of it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A fresh perspective on one of the world’s longest conflicts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This sounds like it could be austere and schematic, but the affecting, authentic performances from the first-time actors make these characters thoroughly authentic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The performances ratchet up to giddy near-hysteria, as Hilde toys with Solness’s randiness and repressed memory.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It’s the kind of outrageous comedy that you might even take your folks to, though probably not your kids. Say what you will about Harmony Korine and his demented geriatrics, at least they take their trash seriously.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    That’s the key to this movie — the way Thérèse looks at things; it’s a rare film that focuses on a woman actually looking and how she responds to what she sees.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Related with stolid majesty, with long shots of brooding landscapes and close-ups of opaque faces, the film provides poor preparation for the subversion of genre conventions to follow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though at times Siddharth can resemble a well-photographed report on India’s social and economic ills, Mehta subtly employs different styles to sustain the poetry, poignancy, and drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Frustratingly elusive and seductively louche, Lespert’s “Yves” probes a cryptic myth and a fragile soul, penetrating neither, but conjuring up a taste of Saint Laurent’s suffering, genius and style.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to being very funny, In a World . . . also makes a case for women to be, well, heard. But in terms of cohesion and narrative, it doesn’t quite come together as a movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    What Stranger by the Lake lacks in suspense and back story it makes up for in atmosphere: It’s a subtle exercise in the pathetic fallacy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Filmmaker Joe Berlinger isn’t so much inspired as disgusted by the notorious gangster in his newest documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like other offbeat and original efforts such as Spike Jonze’s “Her,” Jonathan Glazer’s “Under the Skin,” and Richard Ayaode’s dour “The Double,” it juggles genres, reverses expectations, and resorts to fantasy in order to explore the enigmas of gender, identity, and love.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Silva doesn’t resort to any fancy tricks to depict his characters’ inner experiences. But something happens nonetheless, a bonding of sorts that is almost, if not quite, convincing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is an extended home movie that is also a sociological experiment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It takes a personal rather than a political perspective, exploring the ambiguities of truth and individual identity rather than the complexities of an ongoing historical calamity. And though the human drama is hypnotically gripping, it comes at the expense of the bigger picture.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In person, as seen in Fifi Howls From Happiness, Mitra Farahani’s ambitious and self-reflexive documentary of the artist’s last days, Mohassess enthusiastically acts out those traits. It’s a performance enhanced by his diabolical, phlegm-choked laughter at his own bleakly ironic pronouncements and denunciations of the world in general.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As remorseless in style as it is in message, In the Fog offers little hope and few pleasures, but earns admiration for its elegant exploration of the lowest depths of the human condition.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    His (Hawke) subtle performance also draws attention away from the creaky plot machinery, as does the Spierig brothers’ eye for the seemingly throwaway but pregnant detail.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not known for subtlety, Besson gets the expected laughs, and then some. He also exercises an unwonted finesse, not only with the allusions, but also with variations on the “f” word that, if not poetic, are at least funny.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    True, a lot of marmalade gets spread around, and at times the zaniness gets a bit too slap-sticky, but it’s all good clean fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    '71
    Churns out dread, suspense, and hellish splendor with its derelict cityscapes and breakneck action.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [Terence Stamp] and Vanessa Redgrave, as well as supporting actors Christopher Eccleston and Gemma Arterton, raise Paul Andrew Williams’s entry in the golden age genre from mawkish to genuinely heartwarming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    An effusive, sad, visually gorgeous, and illuminating portrait of the artist.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In a year when black filmmaking has surged with Oscar-touted films such as “The Butler” and the upcoming “12 Years a Slave,” Murray’s Things Never Said has a quiet eloquence of its own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Code Black shows the passion, frustration, and skill of those who work to heal despite the system, but it remains in the dark about why that system is broken and how it can be fixed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like [The Purge and The Conjuring], Adam Wingard’s sly, diabolical, and oddly moral You’re Next draws on the home invasion/haunted house scenario, but outclasses them with its wit, irony, and technically proficient terror.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The small Indonesian island of Bali still evokes images of a tropical paradise where Westerners can escape the discontents of the so-called developed world. Much of that romance lingers in Bitter Honey.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though overloaded with narration, “Honey” triumphs visually, with stunning shots of bees in flight, tracked in slow motion, “Winged Migration”-style, by who-knows-what technical wizardry.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Who knows what they’re fighting about, but given the ecstatic ballet of fists and water, tossed bodies and smashed decor, centered by Leung’s majestic impassivity, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not your everyday dilemma, but as depicted in this lushly detailed and passionately performed melodrama, the mores and traditions of this sequestered, seldom depicted group take on a broader relevance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    So despite Tcheng's effort to add a metaphysical layer to the film, it pretty much repeats the narrative seen in many other documentaries about the fashion world, from Wim Wenders's “Notebook on Cities and Clothes” (1989), to “Unzipped” (1995), to “Valentino: The Last Emperor” (2008).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like “An Inconvenient Truth” (2006), the Oscar-winning film about climate change, it is a call to action. As a screed, it builds a credible, engaging argument, presenting evidence, statistics, talking-head testimony, whimsical charts, poignant personal stories, and animated illustrations of digestive processes to make its case.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    “Shadows” has its share of lines that will be repeated by fans ad infinitum (a favorite: “Yes, now Google it”).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    “So how are you going to get them to dance together?” Dancing never explains how. Instead, as in similar films such as “Hoop Dreams,” it focuses on the contest, reducing the participants to a handful of representative kids who end up learning something about themselves and others.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though at times it threatens to become too generic to be original, or too original to be generic, it retains enough indirection to frustrate those looking for thrills and to engage those willing to be challenged. And by the time the bottom drops out in a characteristically enigmatic ending, Night Moves distinguishes itself as a genuine Reichardt movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Presents enough teasing glimpses into the dancer’s personal and inner life to demand a fuller picture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, Hatley chooses not to offer much context or background history regarding that or other aspects of Helm’s half-century career, other than archival footage of Helm and the Band in their prime, press clippings, and comments from the Band “biographer,” Barney Hoskyns.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this alternately whimsical and grim documentary, Zachary Heinzerling relates the couple’s down-and-out, inspiring saga, which slyly comments on the evolution and ironies of the past half century in contemporary art.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A key point, though, is that all the scientists profiled have staked their careers on this one discovery.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than just a footnote to a wayward period of cultural history, The Source Family portrays an American type, the transcendent charlatan, a latter-day Gatsby, not of material riches but of the soul.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Bizarre, fascinating, and frustrating documentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The quest ends in a surprise Capra-esque resolution, which both satisfies and cloys.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Including the high expectations set up by the film’s early going, Eubank had a thoughtful thriller in the works but along the way he got his signals crossed.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Think Like a Man Too vastly surpasses the septic “The Hangover Part III.” If Story and company keep thinking like filmmakers, maybe three will be the charm.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    In other words, Citizen Koch is preaching to the choir. Which might not be a pointless exercise, seeing how the choir failed to show up for the last midterm election in 2010, and might need extra motivation not to repeat that mistake this November.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    A bittersweet musing about the nature of parenthood and about the conflict between nature and nurture, it is as banal and insightful as its title.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though Mazer’s ambition is laudable, he has not yet integrated the comedy of manners into the comedy of no manners.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Powell never achieves the absurdist, uncanny poetry of that scene in Herzog’s film where a “demented” penguin marches into oblivion, but he does arouse wonder at nature’s sublimity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though it touches on the usual themes of youthful innocence and imagination challenged by misfortune, and on occasion achieves moments of supremely subtle, sublimely exquisite detail, “Momo” strains when it comes to evoking whimsy and magic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though admirable in ambition, McGowan’s decision to broaden his simple story’s scope diminishes an affecting melodrama about the increasingly common, insufficiently acknowledged plagues of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Although Raymond’s career extended over five decades of London sleaze, decadence, and celebrity, neither director nor actor provide much insight into the man or his times, not to mention the significance of Raymond’s prime product.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Flawed as it is, “River” reminds us where all the great music came from.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It’s like a Parisian variation on Nicole Holofcener’s “Please Give,” or the premise of another PBS Masterpiece Theater series with Smith.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Visitors is lovely, soothing, like the cinematic equivalent of tasteful elevator music, but it doesn’t convey as much truth as a single glimpse into Triska’s eyes.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    When the two veteran actors team up in Vermont writer-director Jay Craven’s wry, uneven Northern Borders, adapted from Howard Frank Mosher’s novel, they mesh so well they almost hold the rest of the movie together. But their nuanced performances underscore the weakness of the rest of the cast, and Craven’s erratic tonal shifts from the whimsical to the sentimental trip up the episodic plot.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    In the war between zombies and vampires for the domination of American popular culture, the zombies currently seem to have the edge. So suggests a montage in Rob Kuhns’s amusing but perfunctory documentary about the origins of the 1968 ur-text of zombiedom, George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    As a suspenseful true crime story, 24 Days succeeds. As a warning against the ever present dangers of anti-Semitism, it is eloquent and disturbing. It’s in combining the two that Arcady mishandles the case.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    With his thoughtful exploration of the conflict between desire and responsibility, and his self-reflexive exploration of the themes of voyeurism, ambition, and personal identity, Reeves’s debut shows signs of a talented filmmaker.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The film at times genuinely touches on the bittersweet magic of first love.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    So here’s a tip: Don’t desert this film before giving it a chance. You might not want seconds, but eventually it dishes up a satisfying slice of life.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Escape From Tomorrow, Moore’s sometimes surreal, sometimes sophomoric, black comic phantasmagoria, makes for a bumpy theme park ride.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though Derrickson offers some new twists on old tricks, and evokes a mood of menace with rainy streets, gloomy interiors, and the transformation of comforting everyday objects into something horrible, the story soon devolves into variations of many movies we have seen before.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though engrossing and aesthetically admirable, at times the humorless artiness verges on absurdity. It’s hard to take a film too seriously when plum jam and Bach’s “Chaconne” vie for equal cinematic significance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    A grade A, meat-and-potatoes genre flick.

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