For 379 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Things to Come
Lowest review score: 12 Dangerous Men
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 379
379 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bonello takes on the point of view of Saint Laurent himself, exposing a visionary world seen from within that is as strange and wonderful as that of a magnificently stitched garment turned inside out.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Such miserable people; why should we care? Maybe because Ceylan does. By staging this petulant misery in a snow-filled world of melancholy, unearthly beauty, he underscores their tragedy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    After a period of creative drought, Zhang’s homecoming is a cause for celebration.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    It takes a few minutes to catch on, and it would be indiscrete to specify what it is, but once you figure out what’s really strange about it you have entered the solipsistic prison of a tormented mind.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    May also be among the best war movies of all time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The rest of the film consists mostly of Akerman talking with her mother, blithely and lovingly, about everyday ephemera and about the past (Natalia was a survivor of Auschwitz), both via Skype and at her mother’s genteel home in Brussels.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bi’s singular vision bears comparison to those of other geniuses such as Tarkovsky, Sokurov, David Lynch, Luis Buñuel and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Like those auteurs, he achieves what film is best at but seldom accomplishes — a stirring of a deeper consciousness, a glimpse into a reality transcending the everyday.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Cinematic rarity — a genuinely philosophical film.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    As often happens in films about putting on plays, life imitates art, but in this instance obliquely.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The story offers many opportunities for glibness and sentimentality. Walsh falls for none of them. She enhances the grimness of Lewis’s surroundings, but does not exploit it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Funny, heartbreaking, impeccably observed, and nearly flawless drama.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though “Berberian” bogs down a bit in its infernal spiral, Strickland proves himself to be a rising talent — a master of sound and fury both.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Bernstein communicates Ungerer’s manic spirit and his irrepressible creativity by punctuating the conventions of talking-head interviews and archival footage with animated snippets of Ungerer’s thousands of illustrations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The world of cinema is richer for the voice of Al Mansour; she speaks for the women of her country, and for people everywhere.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This sounds like it could be austere and schematic, but the affecting, authentic performances from the first-time actors make these characters thoroughly authentic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A taut, expertly constructed, and suspenseful police procedural, it also explores the issues of loyalty, trust, betrayal, and revenge that those engaged in such morally ambiguous if essential activities would prefer not to think about.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Of all the great monster mothers in cinema history, Cornelia Keneres (Luminita Gheorghiu, who sets the standard other performances should be judged by this year) ranks high on the list.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the seeming inevitability of tragedy and despair, In Bloom remains true to its title. Though political and personal upheaval threatens to overwhelm them, Eka and Natia’s clarity and courage resist the ignorance, injustice, and rage all around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A fresh perspective on one of the world’s longest conflicts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Compared to his previous films, The Dance of Reality offers a nearly coherent narrative and a gentle, reconciliatory tone.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The opening and closing scenes of this film evoke those in “Crimson Gold.” They are long shots of the outside as seen through a security gate. In “Crimson Gold,” the view is of a chaotic street in Tehran. Here, it is the empty sea. This difference demonstrates what Panahi has been deprived of, and what the world has lost because of it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”

Top Trailers