For 405 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Coming Home
Lowest review score: 12 The Man on Her Mind
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 405
405 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The Mauritanian-born Abderrahmane Sissako, one of the great filmmakers of sub-Saharan Africa, does not need to resort to propaganda in Timbuktu to denounce fanaticism. He has poetry. With subtlety, irony, and even humor, he gradually prepares the viewer for the horror to come.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    As powerful as it is as social commentary, Gett triumphs most as an examination of human relationships.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The vividly realized squalor, cruelty, and ugliness engulf everything, including the narrative.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Kogonada establishes a meditative tone and rhythm as his compositions parallel the building’s pleasing symmetries.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Cinematic rarity — a genuinely philosophical film.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Such miserable people; why should we care? Maybe because Ceylan does. By staging this petulant misery in a snow-filled world of melancholy, unearthly beauty, he underscores their tragedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    It takes a few minutes to catch on, and it would be indiscrete to specify what it is, but once you figure out what’s really strange about it you have entered the solipsistic prison of a tormented mind.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A 2009 film only now getting theatrical distribution in the United States, it is perhaps Farhadi’s richest, most complex and ambitious.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The film confronts not just the expected issue of environmentalism but also explores themes of survival, separation, loss, and death.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A key point, though, is that all the scientists profiled have staked their careers on this one discovery.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    I have not seen the film “Fifty Shades of Grey” but I doubt that it evokes the mystery, wit, and eroticism that Peter Strickland’s sumptuously claustrophobic fable of women in love does. All without nudity, bad dialogue, or the requisite wooden acting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The ending is deeply moving.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This is a hard movie to watch, and even more painful to think about.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    As often happens in films about putting on plays, life imitates art, but in this instance obliquely.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Subtlety and irony are not among the film’s virtues.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bi’s singular vision bears comparison to those of other geniuses such as Tarkovsky, Sokurov, David Lynch, Luis Buñuel and Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Like those auteurs, he achieves what film is best at but seldom accomplishes — a stirring of a deeper consciousness, a glimpse into a reality transcending the everyday.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Another complex and magnificently acted melodrama.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than an hour passes before Khaled and Wikström’s stories intersect, and though it would be an exaggeration to say each redeems the other, in this film the other side of hope is not despair, but decency.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is not only the best horror film since “Under the Skin” (2013), but a subversive and often hilarious commentary on race as well.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    After “Rocco,” Visconti’s style lost the vestiges of naturalism and indulged in rococo artifice and aristocratic splendor.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like films such as Cristi Puiu’s “The Death of Mr. Lazarescu” (2005), Glory transforms that realism into metaphors that don’t just criticize a particular system but lay plain the universal exploitation of the weak and honest by the corrupt and powerful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    '71
    Churns out dread, suspense, and hellish splendor with its derelict cityscapes and breakneck action.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Whether or not Hawke got any answers to his questions about the purpose of being artist, seeking them under the guidance of a teacher like Bernstein resulted in this work of art.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this alternately whimsical and grim documentary, Zachary Heinzerling relates the couple’s down-and-out, inspiring saga, which slyly comments on the evolution and ironies of the past half century in contemporary art.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The performances are meticulous and passionate, the narrative low-key and obliquely sensitive enough to conceal, until the traumatic incidents keep piling up, the film’s contrivance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A kitchen, a guestroom, and swimming pool become battlegrounds. Though hardly revolutionary, “Mother” subverts conventions — both cinematic and social.

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