For 349 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Winter Sleep
Lowest review score: 12 The Man on Her Mind
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 349
349 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In a year when black filmmaking has surged with Oscar-touted films such as “The Butler” and the upcoming “12 Years a Slave,” Murray’s Things Never Said has a quiet eloquence of its own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to directing outstanding performances, Edgerton also suggests psychological processes by means of space, architecture, and décor, exploiting the walls, doorways, windows, and mirrors of the new house to indicate the status of a relationship or self-image.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Religious allusions aside, Alleluia is like “Psycho” combined with “Bonnie and Clyde,” with Norman and Norma Bates as the conjoined criminal couple on the run.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Code Black shows the passion, frustration, and skill of those who work to heal despite the system, but it remains in the dark about why that system is broken and how it can be fixed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As he gets older, Todd Solondz outgrows the cheap shocks and easy nihilism and stumbles toward a mellow misanthropy. He compares his new film Wiener-Dog to “Au Hasard Balthazar” (1966) and “Benji” (1974), though it tends more toward the latter than toward Robert Bresson’s masterpiece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like [The Purge and The Conjuring], Adam Wingard’s sly, diabolical, and oddly moral You’re Next draws on the home invasion/haunted house scenario, but outclasses them with its wit, irony, and technically proficient terror.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The small Indonesian island of Bali still evokes images of a tropical paradise where Westerners can escape the discontents of the so-called developed world. Much of that romance lingers in Bitter Honey.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though overloaded with narration, “Honey” triumphs visually, with stunning shots of bees in flight, tracked in slow motion, “Winged Migration”-style, by who-knows-what technical wizardry.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It’s only the first week of January, but it will be hard to beat Hong Kong director Ding Sheng’s Railroad Tigers for the best opening credit sequence of the year.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Who knows what they’re fighting about, but given the ecstatic ballet of fists and water, tossed bodies and smashed decor, centered by Leung’s majestic impassivity, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is nonstop, epistemological slapstick.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Vitkova brings a distinct gender sensibility to her story, especially with her recurring imagery of milk and blood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not your everyday dilemma, but as depicted in this lushly detailed and passionately performed melodrama, the mores and traditions of this sequestered, seldom depicted group take on a broader relevance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    So despite Tcheng's effort to add a metaphysical layer to the film, it pretty much repeats the narrative seen in many other documentaries about the fashion world, from Wim Wenders's “Notebook on Cities and Clothes” (1989), to “Unzipped” (1995), to “Valentino: The Last Emperor” (2008).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The songs, written by Carney and Gary Clark, have a goofy but genuine appeal. Watch out, or you might end up downloading the soundtrack.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like “An Inconvenient Truth” (2006), the Oscar-winning film about climate change, it is a call to action. As a screed, it builds a credible, engaging argument, presenting evidence, statistics, talking-head testimony, whimsical charts, poignant personal stories, and animated illustrations of digestive processes to make its case.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    “Shadows” has its share of lines that will be repeated by fans ad infinitum (a favorite: “Yes, now Google it”).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Kenner and Schlosser not only remind us of a danger that never went away, but honor the men whose bravery was never recognized.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    “So how are you going to get them to dance together?” Dancing never explains how. Instead, as in similar films such as “Hoop Dreams,” it focuses on the contest, reducing the participants to a handful of representative kids who end up learning something about themselves and others.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A bittersweet, wryly comic, keenly observed look at senescence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Akerman, though, is her own best spokesperson as she discusses her films at locations where they were shot.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though at times it threatens to become too generic to be original, or too original to be generic, it retains enough indirection to frustrate those looking for thrills and to engage those willing to be challenged. And by the time the bottom drops out in a characteristically enigmatic ending, Night Moves distinguishes itself as a genuine Reichardt movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Plá’s comedy is black, but his moral position isn’t black and white.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Presents enough teasing glimpses into the dancer’s personal and inner life to demand a fuller picture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, Hatley chooses not to offer much context or background history regarding that or other aspects of Helm’s half-century career, other than archival footage of Helm and the Band in their prime, press clippings, and comments from the Band “biographer,” Barney Hoskyns.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this alternately whimsical and grim documentary, Zachary Heinzerling relates the couple’s down-and-out, inspiring saga, which slyly comments on the evolution and ironies of the past half century in contemporary art.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A key point, though, is that all the scientists profiled have staked their careers on this one discovery.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than just a footnote to a wayward period of cultural history, The Source Family portrays an American type, the transcendent charlatan, a latter-day Gatsby, not of material riches but of the soul.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Unlike “Belle,” however, in this case Asante does not allow her story to be overwhelmed by period decor and costumes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Bizarre, fascinating, and frustrating documentary.

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