For 312 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Saint Laurent
Lowest review score: 12 Dangerous Men
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 312
312 movie reviews
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    For the most part, though, the film maintains its low ambitions; it is mostly inoffensive, only occasionally ludicrous, and at times, at least for me, genuinely moving.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though Mira shows skill at evoking mood and building tension despite the constrained circumstances of the premise, the narrative quickly and embarrassingly breaks down.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Plays more like an exercise in nostalgia than a dramatic re-creation of a triumphant fight for civil rights.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    At its best, it delves into the murky areas of memory, childhood trauma, and family conflict. But it forgoes such troubling issues for mumbo jumbo and glowing-eyed wraiths.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Strauch’s orotund prose sounds much like that of Werner Herzog, but without the irony. Herzog’s sensibility is missed here; he could have made a masterpiece about the absurdity of these deluded seekers of Eden.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Does not sink to the bathos of Roberto Benigni’s Oscar-winning film (“Life Is Beautiful”), but it does reduce a period of irredeemable horror to the heroics of a single person.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Belle has the pace and sumptuous cinematography of a Merchant and Ivory production, but none of their memorable characters, subtle performances, or literate dialogue.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Charming, but not seductive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite the climactic hugs all around and spiritual healing celebrated by a tearful service in the cathedral, some moments en route make an impression.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    So where does that leave this coming-of-age comedy written and directed by Jan Ole Gerster? Somewhere in the middle, lukewarm and inoffensive, trying hard not to be plebeian or pretentious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    What follows is no “Citizen Kane,” or even “Velvet Goldmine” (1998), Todd Haynes’s arty tale of a reporter trying to track down a missing glam rock star, in which Collette also starred, playing the missing man’s alcoholic wife.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Based on her short film, Candler’s Hellion pads its slender, commonplace, but potentially rewarding premise with contrivances, clichés, repetitiousness, and, when all else fails, implausible, arbitrary melodrama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Usually a French comedy such as this requires some crude modifications before a studio like Touchstone can remake it for American audiences. In this case, though, they just need to lose the subtitles and dub in the voices of actors like Rob Schneider or Adam Sandler. Until then, bon appetit!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, this is one movie about food that I’m forgetting already.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Violette demonstrates how suffering produces great art, and that the artist isn’t the only one who suffers for it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Sadly, the film rapidly devolves into an AARP version of a Jason Bourne-like vendetta, only bloodier and less meaningful.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite the artful, passionate performances by the cast, his experiment comes across more as contrivance than a work of thoughtful, aesthetic detachment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    When it comes to writing and directing movies, though, Murdoch has some work to do. “Girl” meanders narratively and with random chronology, some scenes playing like tepid music videos, others as unhelpful efforts at exposition, some as strained drama, and some as the genuine, funny, spontaneous interactions of gifted young people.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though it features a plucky female protagonist, Annabelle still possesses the same medieval attitude toward women as “The Conjuring,” reducing the gender to the extremes of self-sacrificing mother and malevolent toy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    David Frankel’s film reduces an extraordinary life to a predictable template of bullying, resolve, success, disappointment, and platitudes — a pattern repeated two or three times until the genuinely moving finale.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Things bottom out when Zoe not only hooks up with another lover (there is not an ounce of body fat in this movie), but also misses her son’s soccer game. And up until then we were all having a good time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Unlike other films that successfully explore abstractions, such as Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love” or the memoiristic collages of Terence Davies, it doesn’t seem to have much going on beneath the drab surface.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Directed by splat-pack director Alexandre Aja (“Piranha 3D”) with uncharacteristic but still gruesome restraint, adapted from what seems a very busy novel by Joe Hill, Horns resembles an awkward collaboration between Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stephen King, and Rob Zombie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Those looking for further enlightenment might want to pass on the feel-good cinematic hagiography known as Awake: The Life of Yogananda.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Humorless, pretentious black-and-white tone poem about a very young Abe Lincoln.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Talya Lavie’s Zero Motivation has more substance than a sitcom, even though it’s broken down into three TV series-like episodes. But it’s no “M*A*S*H” — a film to which some have compared it — either.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    As for the performances, only homely Giovana has heart and depth. The two boys lack chemistry, even in chemistry class, due in part to the trite dialogue, or at least as it is translated in subtitles.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    It’s a self-reflexive tour de force, laugh-out-loud in its outrageousness, a true gift from the Movie God, who, if not Tarantino, is in this case probably Sam Peckinpah. You just have to endure 90 minutes of inanity to get to enjoy it.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    It will also make them laugh. Intentionally or not, director Rob Cohen (“Alex Cross”) has put together the most hilarious camp classic since “White House Down” (2013).
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    To its credit, despite a rough start (witch burning and all that), Seventh Son does not succumb to misogyny.

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