For 386 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Anomalisa
Lowest review score: 12 Dangerous Men
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 386
386 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    More conventional in approach than Linklater’s 12-year filmmaking odyssey, “Identity” demonstrates its boldness not with stylistic originality but with political acuity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It takes a woman to make a great film about the all-male bastion of the French Foreign Legion. Claire Denis did so in her elliptical desert updating of Herman Melville’s “Billy Budd” in “Beau Travail” (1999), and her fellow French director Sarah Leonor nearly equals that feat in The Great Man.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Is it an allegory for contemporary Greece? Beats me. Like the films of Buñuel, it’s about the human condition, regarded with bemusement and acuity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Visually, it has the intense intimacy of a dream.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the self-conscious derivativeness and allusions, Tsai’s debut already demonstrates the contrariness and motifs that have distinguished him as a unique, difficult, and transcendent filmmaker.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like another documentary set in North Dakota, Jesse Moss’s “The Overnighters,” they follow the story for months as it unfolds, offering no editorial guidance except dates and places and a soundtrack by T. Griffith that underscores the growing angst and pending horror. Welcome to Leith. Say goodbye to certitude.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    After “Rocco,” Visconti’s style lost the vestiges of naturalism and indulged in rococo artifice and aristocratic splendor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Unlike “Something in the Air,” or even “Saint Laurent,” Eden is utterly apolitical.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Whether or not Hawke got any answers to his questions about the purpose of being artist, seeking them under the guidance of a teacher like Bernstein resulted in this work of art.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This is a hard movie to watch, and even more painful to think about.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Tom Hiddleston puts in a performance as Williams that ranks with that of Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash in “I Walk the Line.” And Hiddleston gets to do it in a better movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Consider it the PG-rated, Hassidic version of “Bridesmaids” (2011), and like that movie the comedy is rooted in pain, eroding hope, and triumphant faith.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The vividly realized squalor, cruelty, and ugliness engulf everything, including the narrative.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Güeros is brutal, ironic, madcap, and grim. Shot by Damian Garcia in black-and-white with the pristine spontaneity of Godard’s cinematographer Raoul Coutard, it is “Bande à part” (1964) meets “Los Olvidados” (1950).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A kitchen, a guestroom, and swimming pool become battlegrounds. Though hardly revolutionary, “Mother” subverts conventions — both cinematic and social.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Compared to his previous films, The Dance of Reality offers a nearly coherent narrative and a gentle, reconciliatory tone.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    By the movie’s end, viewers will have had a soul-searing brush with the unthinkable that far exceeds any real horror film of recent memory, and surpasses in its impact more traditional features and documentaries about the subject.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In a way, Lipes’s documentary resembles Jonathan Demme and David Byrne’s “Stop Making Sense” (1984) — in which Byrne goes on stage solo with a beat box and the rest of the Talking Heads gather one by one — as much as it does Wiseman’s films.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    At its best, which is often, Their Finest by Danish director Lone Scherfig (“Italian for Beginners;” “An Education”) manipulates appearance and reality, relief and recognition, with exquisite finesse. As befits a film about making films.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Step, the African-American competitive art that is the subject of Amanda Lipitz’s taut, intimate, passionate, and celebratory documentary of the same title, is not to be confused with its Irish namesake in “Riverdance.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Immersive, enlightening documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though “Berberian” bogs down a bit in its infernal spiral, Strickland proves himself to be a rising talent — a master of sound and fury both.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Kogonada establishes a meditative tone and rhythm as his compositions parallel the building’s pleasing symmetries.

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