For 379 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Menashe
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 379
379 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    His (Hawke) subtle performance also draws attention away from the creaky plot machinery, as does the Spierig brothers’ eye for the seemingly throwaway but pregnant detail.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Despite outstanding performances, the characters lose subtlety as they grow more extreme, and their secrets when spelled out become anticlimactic. Maybe with a little more mystery, the evil would seem less banal.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not known for subtlety, Besson gets the expected laughs, and then some. He also exercises an unwonted finesse, not only with the allusions, but also with variations on the “f” word that, if not poetic, are at least funny.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    True, a lot of marmalade gets spread around, and at times the zaniness gets a bit too slap-sticky, but it’s all good clean fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    '71
    Churns out dread, suspense, and hellish splendor with its derelict cityscapes and breakneck action.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The film veers from farce to tragedy and relates a twisted variation on the American Dream.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [Terence Stamp] and Vanessa Redgrave, as well as supporting actors Christopher Eccleston and Gemma Arterton, raise Paul Andrew Williams’s entry in the golden age genre from mawkish to genuinely heartwarming.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    An effusive, sad, visually gorgeous, and illuminating portrait of the artist.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Egoyan ekes out an engaging and meaningful potboiler.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    What Meet the Patels could use is a little more meat.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In a year when black filmmaking has surged with Oscar-touted films such as “The Butler” and the upcoming “12 Years a Slave,” Murray’s Things Never Said has a quiet eloquence of its own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to directing outstanding performances, Edgerton also suggests psychological processes by means of space, architecture, and décor, exploiting the walls, doorways, windows, and mirrors of the new house to indicate the status of a relationship or self-image.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Religious allusions aside, Alleluia is like “Psycho” combined with “Bonnie and Clyde,” with Norman and Norma Bates as the conjoined criminal couple on the run.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Code Black shows the passion, frustration, and skill of those who work to heal despite the system, but it remains in the dark about why that system is broken and how it can be fixed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As he gets older, Todd Solondz outgrows the cheap shocks and easy nihilism and stumbles toward a mellow misanthropy. He compares his new film Wiener-Dog to “Au Hasard Balthazar” (1966) and “Benji” (1974), though it tends more toward the latter than toward Robert Bresson’s masterpiece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like [The Purge and The Conjuring], Adam Wingard’s sly, diabolical, and oddly moral You’re Next draws on the home invasion/haunted house scenario, but outclasses them with its wit, irony, and technically proficient terror.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The small Indonesian island of Bali still evokes images of a tropical paradise where Westerners can escape the discontents of the so-called developed world. Much of that romance lingers in Bitter Honey.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though overloaded with narration, “Honey” triumphs visually, with stunning shots of bees in flight, tracked in slow motion, “Winged Migration”-style, by who-knows-what technical wizardry.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Perhaps it’s just as well that other issues remain in the background and the film focuses instead on the bond between Leavey and Rex. Not only is it a compelling metaphor for a woman finding independence and empowerment, it dramatizes a primal emotional relationship that proves heartbreaking and triumphant.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It’s only the first week of January, but it will be hard to beat Hong Kong director Ding Sheng’s Railroad Tigers for the best opening credit sequence of the year.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The film manages to be both crudely hilarious and bluntly satiric while also establishing sympathetic characters, a sharp contemporary wit, a sly, dry absurdism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Rendered heartfelt and compelling by an outstanding cast.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Who knows what they’re fighting about, but given the ecstatic ballet of fists and water, tossed bodies and smashed decor, centered by Leung’s majestic impassivity, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is nonstop, epistemological slapstick.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Vitkova brings a distinct gender sensibility to her story, especially with her recurring imagery of milk and blood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not your everyday dilemma, but as depicted in this lushly detailed and passionately performed melodrama, the mores and traditions of this sequestered, seldom depicted group take on a broader relevance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    So despite Tcheng's effort to add a metaphysical layer to the film, it pretty much repeats the narrative seen in many other documentaries about the fashion world, from Wim Wenders's “Notebook on Cities and Clothes” (1989), to “Unzipped” (1995), to “Valentino: The Last Emperor” (2008).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The songs, written by Carney and Gary Clark, have a goofy but genuine appeal. Watch out, or you might end up downloading the soundtrack.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Raw
    When Ducournau keeps the viewer off balance and doesn’t lose her own, she shows signs of being an outstanding stylist and storyteller, balancing mood, composition, startling images, slow-burning suspense, and sardonic humor.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like “An Inconvenient Truth” (2006), the Oscar-winning film about climate change, it is a call to action. As a screed, it builds a credible, engaging argument, presenting evidence, statistics, talking-head testimony, whimsical charts, poignant personal stories, and animated illustrations of digestive processes to make its case.

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