For 2,330 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 I Served the King of England
Lowest review score: 0 Wild Hogs
Score distribution:
2330 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If we must endure yet another spring-summer cycle of comic book superheroes, this movie at least delivers the wham-bang goods (recycled though they may be).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    One glaring question the film doesn’t raise: Why, given his history, is Tilikum still entertaining in sea parks?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    None of Ferrell's movies have ever really done justice to the best of his "Saturday Night Live" work, but those of us who love his comedy have learned to take the good with the bad.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Both actors are a lot better than this material requires – or deserves.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Lindo gives a powerhouse performance of immense feeling and subtlety.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Moneyball presents a misleading story line in order to prop up Billy Beane as some kind of would-be miracle worker antihero. In truth, he's just another tobacco-chewing go-getter trying to make sense of a game that, thankfully, has never quite made sense.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I kept wishing that Still Mine had jettisoned the film’s true-story trappings and moved more deeply into the Craig-Irene duet unencumbered by bad-news bulletins from the building inspectors. Easily the best parts of the film are those in which husband and wife quietly summon up in often the barest of glances and touches a near-lifetime together.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    In Source Code, the new thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, "Groundhog Day" goes metaphysical. Some people, I know, will argue that "Groundhog Day" was already metaphysical. Perhaps, but compared with "Source Code," it's "Caddyshack."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Evocative and disturbing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Director Paul Greengrass downplays the movie's travelogue aspects by repeating the bobbly, hand-held camera style he used on "The Bourne Supremacy." It's not a style I'm fond of.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I’ve never been able to figure out if Reggio is an artist or a con artist. Perhaps, in some ways, he’s both. He has claimed in interviews that he intended to make a movie about “the wonders of the universe.” Whatever he’s made, for better or worse, I’ve never seen anything quite like it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Gloria is a starting-over story that never quite picks up a head of steam. Lelio paces the action as a series of sketches, and the hit-or-miss quality of the material makes for a bumpy ride.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The collision of sleek melodrama and old Woody Allen stand-up routines is at times oddly effective and at other times just odd.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    During vast sections of Broken Embraces, I wished I was watching the actual old-time noirs instead of the miasmic concoction that Almodóvar has made from them.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It plays out all the usual tropes of the investigative-journalism genre – the hot tips, the clandestine meetings, the hand-wringing about ethics, etc. – without adding a jot of novelty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Kushner's proactive stance on gay rights is prominently aired and, to a lesser extent, so are his musings on the Arab-Israeli situation. His participation in the screenplay for Steven Spielberg's controversial "Munich" did not make it into the film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Estevez directs with ease and assurance but, both internally and externally, not enough happens to these people.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    About two-thirds of the way through, Rendition takes a bad turn and sells out most of what made it worth watching in the first place. Witherspoon is given little to do except look weepy, Freeman's change of heart is Q.E.D., and the radical Islamist subplot overwhelms the action, which becomes so confusingly structured that I thought the projectionist had misplaced a reel.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a strange movie – simultaneously rawly realistic and airbrushed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I wish the film, which is mostly a standard-issue talking-heads-and-clips affair, had showcased more of her performing, but what we see still justifies her fleeting fame.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Since Mr. Bean rarely speaks a complete sentence, the effect is of watching a silent movie with sound effects. This was also the dramatic ploy of the great French director-performer Jacques Tati, who is clearly the big influence here.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    No
    The tone of uplift is earned. Larraín’s unarguable point is that, in politics, if we wait for good to issue only from the pure in heart, we will be waiting a very long time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What this film is really about is how interconnected we all are, like it or not, on the Internet, and how alluring and alarming this can be.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What have the Yes Men actually accomplished with their japery? Their film is an inadvertent reminder that activist antics are not the same thing as reform.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    There are enough pleasantries and good jests in this new film to make a meal.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Which is not to say the movie is anything less than diverting. It’s just that diverting is often all it is.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If I had to give a two-word review of Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life, it would be: "Wow! Huh??"
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Bee Season, at its core, is about something powerful: The ways in which family members wreak destruction on each other with the best of intentions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film could be more adept and probing, but the ladies - Cleo Hayes, Marion Coles, Elaine Ellis, Fay Ray, and Geri Kennedy - are delightful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Snarky and enjoyable, but it could have been a ferocious black comedy. No Thank You For Playing It Safe.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Caine is reason enough to see any movie. He gives this clever, somewhat lumbering caper movie a deep-seated soul.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The Town might have amounted to something more than an occasionally good movie about crooks in trouble. There's a knife-edge here, but it's been blunted.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    La Vie en Rose elevates Piaf the archetype over Piaf the artist. Although I question this approach, I'm not sure it could have been done any differently, at least given the facts of Piaf's life. If there is such a way, Duhan didn't find it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Hellboy II comes across as an original. But being original is not always the same thing as being wonderful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The young cast is mostly callow and TV-bland and the special effects don't quite seem worth that hefty price tag, but overall this is a presentable addition to the franchise.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The ultimate feel-good movie about feeling bad. And within those limits, it succeeds all too well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A slight but winning heart-tugger.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Too often ambles into inconsequentiality. And, predictably, Ned becomes a kind of family savior – the idiot becomes the sage. It's Frank Capra for dummies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a major performance (Ruffalo) in a minor movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It would be easy to overrate I've Loved You So Long, which often dampens its best effects with undue tastefulness, but the image of Scott Thomas, with her despairing resilience, stays with one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The wonderful Polish actor Jerzy Stuhr plays the harried papal spokesman. It's a marvelous movie until the halfway point, when it unaccountably devolves into silliness.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    So few unexploitative movies are made about young black men, especially young black gay men, that the overpraise for this frail, sweet, discursive fantasia is understandable – and forgivable. It’s a beautiful film around the edges.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Werner Herzog, better known as one of the finest living directors, plays a bad guy with Teutonic relish. If he doesn't watch it, he'll have a whole other career for himself playing dead-eyed villains.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Fiennes's performance, tricky and impassioned, is the showpiece.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The strongest exchange in the film comes when he is confronted by several angry black activists who believe what he is doing is self-abasing and hurtful to the cause of civil rights. It is left for you to be the judge. I think he’s a hero. Every little bit helps.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    As Molière, Romain Duris is frisky and, playing the wife of his benefactor, Laura Morante proves once again that she is one of the most intelligent and attractive actresses in the world.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Consistently good as long as it centers on Buck and his seriocomic travails.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film, some of which looks staged, is too slick, and its feminist emphasis, complete with Australian performer Sia singing “You can do anything” on the soundtrack, grates. But Aisholpan triumphs over these excesses.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Almodóvar is attempting to create a continuum of genres as well, one that particularly involves the traditional Hollywood “women’s picture” and film noir. That he doesn’t altogether succeed is perhaps due to the fact that Almodóvar is too enraptured by old movie conventions to give them a new life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    With a minimum of actorly fuss, Winger shows us the rage and hurt inside this overcontrolled woman. It's a great piece of acting – high drama at the service of the highest talent.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The movie, despite what you may have gathered from the goofy trailer, is more sweet than silly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's all fairly entertaining but also confusing for anybody who doesn't get the Wall Street lingo. Irons, as the company's chief executive officer, seems to sympathize with us: He keeps asking his minions to explain the impending problems in plain English.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The first-time director, James Marsh, and his co-writer Milo Addica (who wrote "Monster's Ball"), sustain a black-comic tone, and the performances, as far they go, are quietly chilling.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Durkin is a bit too fond of drawn-out scenes of ominous anomie, and he doesn't provide enough psychological ballast for Martha's misery. He doesn't need to. Olsen, with her angelic face and hard-bitten voice, provides it for him.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Langella's performance turns what might have been a "Twilight Zone"-style trifle into something more: a movie about a proud, ornery man combating his fearfulness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Blitz captures high school atmosphere well – not an easy thing to do – but overall the movie coasts on quirkiness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Strangely moving and mournful, but I wish more had been made of the beauty these people are relinquishing, if only as a counterweight to all that artful drear.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    For movie buffs, the only real fun to be had at Inception could be toting up the lifts from other movies, including Cocteau’s “Blood of a Poet” and “The Matrix” series and just about anything by Kubrick.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's all a bit precious and preening, but Coogan is marvelous, almost as good as he was in Winterbottom's "24 Hour Party People."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Braugher perhaps overvalues the parallels between Stephanie and Lydie. The scenario is too schematic and diminishes the power of each woman's story. She frames the drama as a cross between a whodunit and a whydunit, and neither strategy is entirely successful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Fiennes brings to the role a shimmering subtlety.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If Jones were a more accomplished director, and if the relationship between Pete and his captive wasn't so schematic, this movie might have been worthy of Sam Peckinpah.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film works best when it focuses on the touching, crazymaking relationship between the two men.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s all fairly entertaining and eminently disposable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film works best as a straightforward melodrama set in an anything but straightforward world.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    In some ways, this glossily enjoyable movie is a lot closer to Hollywood than Beirut. At times, I thought I was watching some oddball Lebanese variant on "Barbershop."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Fukunaga has a fine, spacious film sense and a gift for action, but the doomy, heavy-handed plot devices and overwrought, overacted gangland set pieces betray a novice's hand.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Lelouch means to transcend the genre. He doesn't really move much beyond his usual glib panache here, but the plot is intriguing and so are the actors.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A lumpy admixture of politics and carnality, but when it all comes together, it has a lingering force.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Black Mass is like a playlist of greatest hits from other, better movies.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Director Stefan Forbes interviews a slew of victims and beneficiaries of the Atwater attack machine and, in the process, gives us an even-handed portrait of a man who, as much as anybody, bears responsibility for the toxicity of high stakes political campaigning on both sides of the aisle.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Milk is an agitprop fantasy about the selflessness of sainthood. If anybody but Penn was playing the saint, we'd probably feel as if we were being sold a bill of goods. Instead, he just about pulls it off. Such is the treachery of talent.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The best commentator is Alda, whose rueful memories of being raised as a boy in burlesque are the film's highlight. "It was a form of abuse," he says of those days, but without rancor. It was, after all, the only childhood he knew.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The filmmaking is often wayward, the scenes of confrontation sometimes too stagey, but Oduye is a marvelous young actress with a camera-ready face brimming with soulfulness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Taut almost to the point of abstraction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Decorous to a fault, in the manner of middling Eric Rohmer talkfests, it's a film that could use some shaking up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s to Nathan’s credit that he doesn’t negate the allure of dirt-bike riding as an escape hatch from inner-city woes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    There are many kinds of heroism, of course, but the version on display in Sully is, well, unsullied, and that sort of thing is more suitable for a monument than a movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A tribute to the therapeutic powers of musicmaking and choral camaraderie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The Wave, directed by Roar Uthaug, is pretty good. It’s also pretty strange. At least for American viewers – and Norwegians, too? – experiencing all these familiar disaster movie tropes in a Scandinavian setting, even on a relatively low budget, can be weirdly disorienting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The irony of this film is that it's all about how we need to come together to conquer a calamity that pushes us apart.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film's moral lesson – that violence begets violence – isn't exactly a showstopper, and the balm that is laid on Nawal and her riven family can't quite compensate for the poison that preceded it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    How does all this play out for those of us – i.e., me – who have not been staying up nights fretting over the origins of the X-Men and Women? The answer is: Fairly well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    We get to see film of daughter Tricia’s wedding (her father is a surprisingly agile ballroom dancer) and other oddities. We also hear more of the famous audiotapes than usual. You’ll be interested to know that Nixon, not in praise, referred to Henry Kissinger as a “swinger.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a universal story that is also, by virtue of its very particular time and place, a singular experience.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The linkages between these mostly brief snippets is somewhat haphazard, but, given the waywardness of her travels, that’s appropriate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Complexly intriguing documentary about psychedelic rock icon Roky Erickson.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's slick stuff, but Lawrence, in her most high-low, sad-comic turn yet, is remarkable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Next time out, more dwarfs, more Aslan, and definitely more Reepicheep.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The Invisible Woman at its best does justice to the complicatedness of its characters – just as Dickens did as a writer.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    By turns fascinating and infuriating.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    For a movie about hard-driving pioneers, there is nevertheless much existential ennui in the air.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    “Séraphine” was haunting; Violette, for all its writhings, is familiar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's a wish-fulfillment fantasy posing as hard-edged realism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Rossi investigates the increasing use of massive open online courses and other flexible programs and talks to such education experts as Columbia professor Andrew Delbanco.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The great Ennio Morricone, still going strong at 87, wrote the marvelous film score.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film is often​ sharp and amusing, but it’s a doodle in the Coen canon.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Things take several turns for the worse as the story plays out, and the film loses much of its charm. But it's a fascinating artifact, and never more so than when it features clips from Chinese and, of all things, Albanian propaganda films.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Penn has a real feeling for the stray moments in life that suddenly rush up and overwhelm us with emotion. He also has an eye for beauty in the wilds, of which this film has many. And he's very good with actors. What he lacks is a sharper eye for the wooziness of romanticism, and that wooziness, despite some truly breathtaking moments, infuses Into the Wild.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Has an inordinate number of good laughs mixed in with the not-so-good ones.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The implicit question overhanging the film: Is the political impetus to present only “positive” imagery of black people an injustice to the fullest range of their experience?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Although nothing beats seeing and hearing the real story, Herzog has done a fairly compelling job of blending staged action with docudrama authenticity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a filmmaker’s conceit. These filmmakers may come from Nebraska, but, from the looks of things, they don’t want to be spending much time there.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If audiences are hesitant to believe that the fraternization in this film really happened, it will be because of the storytelling, not the story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The most interesting character in Imperium is not even Nate. It’s Gerry Conway (Sam Trammell), a seemingly normal family man who reads the great philosophers and loves the music of Brahms and Tchaikovsky, even making an exception for the recordings of Jewish maestro Leonard Bernstein. Terrorists come in all flavors.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Braff plays Aidan with easygoing exasperation and Hudson is better than I’ve seen her since “Almost Famous.” As a director, Braff touches on lots of Big Themes: mortality, marriage, fatherhood, the disillusion of dreams. Nothing quite comes to full boil, though.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A long wallow in misery and, after a while, the pain morphs into polemic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Eric Eason's script is sometimes unduly contrived and derivative, but we are always aware that something larger is being played out.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I found it immensely touching that these women found it in themselves to keep plugging away. Despite everything, they ended their days with a measure of peace and happiness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a flurry of good gags and bad. The good ones are worth sitting around for.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Canet has a good feeling for lowlife atmosphere and he works up a few fine Hitchcockian twirls. Kristin Scott Thomas and Nathalie Baye round out the sleek cast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Movie actors are notoriously inarticulate about their craft, but what about movie directors? If the documentary Great Dir­ectors is any indication, the returns are a bit more promising.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    This is one of those stories that, on some primal level, goes straight to the heart. Be aware that the film features a child rape scene.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The action and special effects are mostly first-rate and Vogt-Roberts maintains a vaguely satiric tone that sidesteps schlockiness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Clear away the annoying avant-gardism and you have a powerful movie about a writer, Phillip, who undergoes a mental breakdown and is pulled halfway back to health by his girlfriend.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Without an actor of Broadbent’s poise and humor, The Sense of an Ending – which, I must add, is appropriately also the title of a famous work of literary criticism by Frank Kermode about theories of fiction – would be a bit too fusty.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Anderson can't quite rise above his own quirkiness. It's not that he can't respond to the beauty he places before us – he can – but his jokiness keeps undercutting his own best efforts. The Darjeeling Limited is a transitional film for him: He's outgrown a comic style that can no longer accommodate his deeper feelings.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Four university students band together under the obnoxious mentorship of Andre (Thibault Vinçon), who is meant to be brilliant but, to me at least, seemed all too obviously a poseur. His betrayal of his friends deepens the movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    At times the filmmakers seem to be taking potshots at Philomena for her placidity; other times Martin is made to seem crass and unfeeling – insufficiently spiritual. Life lessons are imparted, although the players never budge very much from their initial attitudes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What does it all mean? I'm not convinced that Fricke's movies are much more than exalted travelogues, but you certainly feel as if you've been somewhere after you've seen one of them.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film is too artsy for its own good, but it has some marvelous Coen Brothers-style black humor.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Words and Pictures is a minor effort from Schepisi, but minor Schepisi still trumps most of what’s out there.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The sadness and almost Chaplinesque pathos that ensues is well wrought and Close, although she is so recessive that at times she seems to fade into the ether, is quite touching.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Allen is content to have Jasmine, babbling to herself, waft into a psychoneurotic, Antonioni-esque haze that seems preordained by her class and her predicament. Her cry for help, if you wipe away all the artifice, resembles nothing so much as a plea for her charge cards to be reinstated.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The script is more functional than funny, and the animation, while adept, is not altogether memorable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Although I Am Big Bird is no great shakes as a piece of filmmaking, and skews into treacly inspirational terrain, it’s still worth seeing to make the acquaintance of a man who, although he would probably be the last to say so, is an artist of the first rank. And a nice guy, too. What a rare combo.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Nothing more than an efficient time-killer with the added bonus of being based on a real misadventure. But, unlike its benighted cast of characters, it gets the job done without a hitch.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Not always believable, but the film has a moody expressiveness that stays with you.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A couple of scenes directly reference the Iraq war and the Holocaust (where the humans are herded into cattle cars), and this is taking things much too seriously. This is a big blow-'em-up franchise movie. It should not under any circumstances be confused with a Statement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Without Hudson, Dreamgirls would be a whole lot less exciting. Knowles, the ostensible star, is rather bland, and Foxx, surprisingly, seems miscast. Murphy is wonderful, but that should be no surprise.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    See it after you've eaten dinner. And don't see if you've recently been to "Ratatouille."
    • 24 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What links all these characters is Myers's gift for antic, elfin burlesque. He's like a second-best Peter Sellers.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's this year's "An Inconvenient Truth."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A kind of companion piece to Altman’s “The Long Goodbye,” and it’s the sort of failure that only a director (Paul Thomas Anderson) of his talents could make – a movie about a stoner private eye (Joaquin Phoenix) in Los Angeles circa 1970 that seems to have been concocted in a stoned haze of its very own.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The new film Paris by writer-director Cédric Klapisch was originally supposed to carry the subtitle "An Ephemeral Portrait of an Eternal City." That kind of sums it up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If you've seen "To Sir, With Love," "Dead Poet's Society," "The Corn is Green," or "Stand and Deliver" - to take a random sample - you've already seen much of this movie. Swank is good, though, and so is Patrick Dempsey as her suffering husband.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The people who made Flight have done a courageous thing. With all the potential revenue to be had from in-flight movie sales, they have made a movie that is guaranteed to never be shown on an airplane.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Mangold front-loads the action, but near the end there’s a first-rate fight atop a bullet train between Wolverine/Logan and some especially pesky ninjas. It puts the train fights in the recent “The Lone Ranger” to shame.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    With all this going for it, Vicky Cristina Barcelona should be better than it is. But there's something intriguing going on here. It's a movie about the sacrifices that people make to be happy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Despite the film’s emphasis on Ryota’s transformation, the most piercing moment for me came in the scene in which his wife anguishes over her guilt in not realizing right away, as a mother, that Keita was not her birth son.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The rags-to-riches-to-rags trajectory is shopworn, but the sibling rivalries are cantankerous and goofy and Bernal's Tato, who fancies himself a pop singing star, wouldn't make the first cut on "American Idol."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Still, I prefer a bit more drama in my political docudramas. The Conquest never really breaks out of its genre in the way that, say, "The Queen" or "Il Divo" or the more fictionalized "In the Loop" did.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Joffe for the most part amps up the melodrama without tearing Greene's complex weave, but everything unravels toward the end with some staggeringly bad staging. It's as if the film itself had been mugged.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Anthony doesn't have a large emotional range as an actor, and neither does Lopez. Still, the musical numbers, which constitute a hefty portion of screen time, are thrilling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    At its best when it gets into the cutthroat dynamics of academic competition, which are both horrifying and amusing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film is good enough to keep all the Marvel Comics crazed audiences out there deliriously happy while keeping the rest of us earthbound types in moderate thralldom.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Will Tarantino, who is more talented than he allows, ever break out of his perpetual adolescence and make a movie that does more than glorify his love of schlock? Will we ever get a "Tarantino Unchained"?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    My favorite voice/animation combo, however, is Stephen Colbert's very terrestrial president of the United States.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film suffers from late-stage Scorsese-itis – wacky, low-slung, high-octane melodrama with lots of yelling and overacting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Thompson is very good at playing imperious, and she even manages an unexpected trace of flirtiness in a few offhanded moments with Hanks.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The aliens are as gloppy and gross as ever. I especially liked the joke about Andy Warhol being an alien – except didn't we know that already?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    This is a movie about how one’s passion can burn away and leave in its place a vast nostalgia.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Oliver Stone's film paints a reasonably complex portrait of Morrison's life and times. [01 Mar 1991]
    • Christian Science Monitor
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a gangster movie that tries to be more than that, not always successfully. In his own small-scale way, Chandor wants to expand the reach of his vision to “Godfather” status, with Abel as his shining (tainted) knight.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A documentary about the alternately celebrated and reviled German-born philosopher who gave us the catchphrase “the banality of evil.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    More good than bad, at least until its too tidy conclusion. Since it's essentially a three-character movie, it's a good thing that the characters, and the actors who play them, can hold the screen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Hoffman, bloated and flushed, does not look well in this film. But he is such a consummate actor that whatever infirmities he may have been fighting become a part of his performance. His portrayal, complete with a convincing German accent, is a fully rounded portrait of courage and dissolution.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Woody Allen’s Magic in the Moonlight is a “serious” movie attempting to be lighthearted. It deals with the same issues that Allen’s idol, Ingmar Bergman, often grappled with – namely, the battle zone of reason versus mysticism – but offhandedly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Weary as I am of documentaries built around competitions, this one is charming because the three teens, especially the girls, are so radiantly intense about the sport.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Saskia Rosendahl is a highly expressive actress within the limited confines of her character, and the film is studded with memorable scenes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    This camp farce has its moments of high hilarity, and Sedaris is a spark plug, but it's wildly uneven.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    First-time director and co-writer George Ratliff skirts, but never quite crosses, the line into absurdity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Scarlett Johansson plays the head zookeeper and she's a lot less mannered than usual.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    For a movie touting "inner peace," this 3-D sequel sure goes in for its share of battle scenes, but for the most part they are excitingly conceived.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Whether intentionally or not, Martin has given us something truly spooky: A full-fledged portrait of a hollow man.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What rescues Eagle vs. Shark is its focus on Lily. Although Horsley overdoes the winsomeness, she is genuinely appealing. Love erases Lily's geekiness and in its place stands an attractive young woman.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    At best, Helena's wiggy adventures recall such Jean Cocteau films as "Orpheus" and "Blood of a Poet." At worst, they resemble the Vegas act of Cirque du Soleil.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    War Horse, despite its excellences, is a supreme demonstration of a director phoning it in.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Streep’s performance has been criticized for being too theatrical, but that’s off the mark: The character she’s playing is supposed to be theatrical. She’s a woman playing a part – the ravaged matriarch.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Princess, as a singer, is the real deal, with a throaty resonance that at times recalls Nina Simone. What Kutiman, whom she eventually meets in Israel, has given her is a newfound and miraculous platform for her talent.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If, like me, you find the movie technique known as motion capture creepy, you might be put off going to see Steven Spielberg's 3-D The Adventures of Tintin.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Renoir at least looks like a great movie. If you want a full-scale immersion in this material, I recommend “Renoir, My Father,” Jean Renoir’s wonderful 1958 biography. This book is the touchstone for all matters Renoir, both père and fils.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Following the shows from rehearsals to Tony Awards night, she gets behind the scenes and does a good job conveying the incessant anxieties and glee of the talents involved.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Overlong and repetitive as it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, at least delivers the goods.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The problem with The Good Shepherd is that it's a closed-off movie about a closed-off individual. Wilson is inscrutable from the get-go, and remains so. Damon does subtle work within the narrowest of confines.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A movie like Ben-Hur, while almost never stirring or imaginative in the way that the true epics of Griffith or Gance or Kurosawa are, nevertheless has a basic appeal.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Rivette keeps the life-is-a-play metaphysics to a minimum, and the cast, including Jeanne Balibar and Sergio Castellitto, is attractive.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As with much of Soderbergh's avant-garde work, his garde isn't quite as avant as he would have us believe it is. Still, Soderbergh's jazzed stylistics can be smartly entertaining. Without them, an uneven movie like Traffic might seem more of a mélange than it already is.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    By continually interrupting the sequences of the adult couple with scenes of the young pair, Eyre shatters the emotional power of Dench and Broadbent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The set pieces, such as an unmasked Spider-Man trying to stop a runaway subway car, are furiously scary, and compensate for all the icky mooning and moping that Peter does whenever he's questioning his gift, which is most of the time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Tends to settle for easy, homiletic insights. But it also has a collection of first-rate performances by some marvellous actresses.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The hang-loose grodiness of these films has its charms, and the Ray-Banned team of Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, at its best, is good vaudeville.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Costner is always at his best when he’s a little ornery, and Duvall is the same way. His grizzled performance is so thoroughly in character that he even chews as if it were 1882.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cold Mountain has some marvelous, intimate moments and a real feeling, at times, for the loss that war engenders, but it also has more than its share of hokum--which would be more entertaining if the hokum were juicier.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In the scenes between Hanks and Newman, we get glimpses of greatness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    iIsn't really much more than a funny, touching little squiggle, but it has a bracing honesty and pays particular heed to the betweenness in people's lives, to how much goes on when nothing seems to be going on at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It can't compare to what might have been: a full-scale performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as an Irish raging bull--a rebel with a cause. There are still traces of greatness in what he attempts, and it's more than enough to make the movie worth a lingering look.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Crudup, whose features have the appropriate delicacy, plays Ned with complete conviction; it’s difficult to imagine anyone else succeeding as well.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Freaky Friday gives Curtis the chance to go all goofy and showcase her gift for splayed physical comedy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A prime piece of whirlybird filmmaking, and the technique saps what might have been a powerful experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Disney's Lilo & Stitch, which is animated in the traditional way, with watercolor backgrounds, is lovely, and funny, too. It owes a great deal to Japanese anime, but there's also a "Looney Tunes" friskiness to it that's distinctively homegrown.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The best thing about Insomnia is that despite director Christopher Nolan's soft spot for moody-blues obfuscation, he has the good sense to keep his star in practically every shot.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Reygadas is both a sophisticate and a primitive: He sets up his film as a religious allegory, with the nameless painter as a kind of suffering Christ and the old woman--whose name is Ascen, as in Ascension--as his redeemer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The point of this film seems to be that wholesomeness is a sign of maturity, and it partially cancels out the performers. Juliet Stevenson breaks through anyway. She has a charged core, like Judy Davis, and she makes you root for her passage to happiness. [8 May 1991, p.6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The Lost World is a smoother, scarier ride than its predecessor, with twice as many dinosaurs twice as well designed eating twice as many people...But he's not particularly playful with his terrors here, and that's a disappointment coming from a filmmaker who can mix scares and laughs the way no one else ever has.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Powerful, uneven police drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Noé shoots his sequences in long, unbroken takes, and the unblinking horror that results is, I think, the opposite of exploitation. There has been so much lurid bloodletting in the movies that you might think nothing could faze us anymore. Think again.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In a confused world, this is a movie with answers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Russell is unusual among first-time directors in his ability to mold and shape performance. [28 Jul 1994 Pg. F2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Keys takes a scattershot approach to Cuban music, filming not only specific artists, like Los Cohibas and Los Zafiros, but also street musicians in the barrio and just about everywhere else he can find them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Face/Off wouldn't work without two great actors, and it doesn't always work with them. But their gifts justify the whole loony enterprise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As in many a French movie, especially crime movie, the philosophe and the crook turn out to be each other’s mirror image.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It’s both lowdown and effete, a jamboree of whoopee jokes and sick wit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A fine example of what a filmmaker can achieve when she takes on a great subject and lets it play out with all the respect and attention it deserves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Caine is burlesquing his own iconography and enjoying every minute of it. He hasn't lost his dignity, though; it takes a lot of self-possession to act this blissfully silly. He even looks good with bad teeth.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In political terms, True Crime is a far cry from "Dirty Harry" -- it actually stands up for due process of law. In Hollywood, I believe this is known as mellowing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    So deliriously chockablock with high-flying, color-coordinated fight scenes that non-aficionados may find it all a bit bewildering--a gorgeous abstraction. It sure is gorgeous, though, and it has a dream cast
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It all works on the level of a sprightly sitcom: lesbianism for the Lucy-and-Ethel crowd.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Every generation has to discover the same clichés that were drummed into previous generations, and kids could do worse than to learn them from this film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Eastwood's earnestness has its own stoic charm. There's something nutty but also heroic in how he plays this macho-man-with-the-heart-of-a-woman premise with a straight face.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    What unites everything is Jarmusch’s playful, hang-dog absurdism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Watching this movie, you get the feeling that the Depression existed so that Seabiscuit could be memorialized.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Breezily enjoyable but thin.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Arkin has a great and gentle feeling for small-time malcontents, and he knows how to make their woes our own. He does justice to the human comedy -- and redeems the movie.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In The Circle, which is banned in Iran, the enforced society of women is, in effect, a community of adults treated as children.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The film was adapted from a 1993 novel by Robert Bober, who drew on his own childhood experiences, and as it unwinds, one begins to appreciate Deville's desire to see things work out well for these people.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A pretty good documentary about a great subject.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    One of the glummest and most forbidding thrillers ever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    For all its high-end ambitions, This So-Called Disaster has a tabloid-TV-like appeal: We want to see if these volatile performers get on each other's nerves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A smart little teen picture that, for a change, actually features recognizable teens.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    More entertaining than it has a right to be. It's pulpy and preposterous, and yet it gets at a real truth.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Practitioners of Cajun, Creole, and zydeco music strut their stuff. So do the players of a style new to me but instantly beloved: I'm speaking of swamp pop.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Watching this film is a little bit like getting mauled and tickled at the same time. The filmmakers have given the whole shebang a hefty levity, and that's not easy to accomplish in a full-scale disaster movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It’s an odd fable: Viktor is the mysterious visitor who shows us what the American Dream is all about--in the movie’s terms, compassion for others--without ever wanting to become an American himself. He's a spiritual twin to E.T., who also had trouble phoning home.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    If the bad guys in the real world were all this obvious, life would be a whole lot easier.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    When something heartfelt occurs in this movie, you accept it without too much squirming. The disciplined yet intuitive way in which these actors connect is a model of ensemble performance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    For most of the way, One False Move is taut and sure-footed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    More often than not, Moore goes for the guffaw, and as enjoyable as that can be, it falls short of producing the kind of devastating, in-depth analysis that might really challenge the hearts and minds of ALL audiences, left and right. At the very least, this approach undercuts the effectiveness of Moore’s own case.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Hoffman has his specialty, though, and it’s not inappropriate here: He always looks supersmart and yet his reactions to what goes on around him are superslow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Stunning, and it has the added bonus of being about an era that is virtually new to movies. As a dramatic achievement, however, it is not quite so amazing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A kind of psychological whodunit, but without the thrills. The clue-making is rather desultory, as if Cronenberg were indulging a narrative strategy he didn’t really care for.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Complicated thriller that gets more interesting as its complications pile up.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    I'm all for films that don't flow from the usual Hollywood test tubes, but A Civil Action is basically the standard formula with a dash of downbeat.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Max
    Noah Taylor does startlingly well by this role, but the conceit behind the film is a bizarre piece of wish-fulfillment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Entertaining documentary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    An ungainly, intermittently harrowing omnibus filled with moments of piercing sorrow and rage.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As a technical achievement, K-19 is right up there with Das Boot. Don't expect much dramatic depth, though. The fathoms descended in this movie are strictly nautical.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Their instincts as filmmakers override their instincts as moralizers. Menace II Society is best--and most shocking--when it just sets out its horrors and lets us find our own way. [26 May 1993, Calendar, p.F-1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's still possible to have a good time at this movie, and the primary reason is De Niro.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The Village is a better movie (than Signs) --probably his best since "The Sixth Sense"--but it indulges Shyamalan's penchant for messianic uplift.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    There's nothing much to the movie, except for the amiability of the actors and the layers of feeling Linklater provides, but that's just almost enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Mamet doesn't take the material as far as it can go -- we're left with a pleasing fable about the battle of the sexes and the virtues of persistence in a just cause. The neatness of it all is both appealing and appalling, and perhaps this combo is what finally hooked Mamet.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's sweet and winsome and a little pat, done with just enough feeling to lift it out of its class. [15 Mar 1995, Pg.F5]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A loose-limbed documentary about the hip-hop D.J. scene that, for know-nothings like me, is highly informative without being in the least academic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In this otherwise rather schematic swatch of social catharsis, Brazil's Fernanda Montenegro gives the best performance by an actress I've seen all year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The stage is set for a wonderful movie, and yet The Luzhin Defence, based on the Vladimir Nabokov novel The Defense, never courts greatness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's a pure (guilty) pleasure trip. That's pleasure, De Palma–style -- twisted, dirty, voyeuristic, a vast glissando of amorality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Great on atmosphere and less good on everything else. That’s not entirely a knock.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's a film enthralled by its own lower depths… Although Bad Lieutenant is structured as a redemptive thriller, it functions primarily as a freak show with religioso overtones. [30 Dec 1992, Calendar, p.F-7]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Evans, in effect, is the real producer here, and the film, which mostly consists of artfully blended archival footage, comes across like a last will and testament.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Taut and straightforward and a little grungy, which is how these movies ought to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    I much prefer the whacked-out, Dr. Strangelove-ish brand of political-apocalypse film to all this straitlaced you-are-there dramaturgy, which seems a throwback to the early sixties not only in time but in spirit. But what Thirteen Days sets out to do it does admirably.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The emotional resolutions aren't pat, exactly. But they're not messy either, and for material this inherently volatile, that seems like a cheat.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Its stars, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, are on screen virtually all of the time, and they're always worth watching. But the film puts such a premium on tastefulness that it never threatens to become exciting. [23 Nov 1990]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cory Yuen's So Close is a kind of Hong Kong martial-arts variation on the Charlie's Angels movies, only better.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cunningham's depth of feeling transformed the book's premise into something beyond sniggers or camp, and the best moments in the movie, which was directed by theater veteran Michael Mayer in his film debut and adapted by Cunningham, have a similar emotional charge.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's a B-movie with A-accouterments.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Eminently disposable, but that's its charm. It stays with you just long enough to make you smile.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Pleasingly shaggy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    del Toro blends agit-prop politics and ghoulishness without making the entire enterprise seem silly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A true killing comedy would require a great deal more sophistication than first-time writer-director Peter Duncan brings to the party. He hasn't made a black comedy, really; it's more like a black spoof.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    She sometimes falls into the same trap that Lenny Bruce fell into, playing the taboo-breaking emancipator, but for the most part she's blessedly bawdy.
    • New York Magazine (Vulture)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Excruciatingly vivid.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Too much of this fantasy is filled out with artsy folderol, but it's a movie like no other--except, maybe, one by Guy Maddin.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A lovely confection.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The director of "Gallipoli" and "The Year of Living Dangerously" has muffled the rage and darkness of his best work in favor of an antiquated pleasingness. Master and Commander is a too-comfy classic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    His (Aoyama) existential odyssey is so attenuated and aloof that he turns suffering into an art thing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Jeunet wants us to know that times are hard for dreamers and that one shouldn't pass up a chance for true love. He means it, no doubt, but he doesn't have the simplicity of soul to quite bring off the sentiment. Still, we're charmed by the attempt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Parts of this film are as blandly lulling as a mood tape, but at best it’s a literally soaring experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    At its most basic level, Cast Away is a graceful and powerfully rendered survivalist saga.... And yet there's something generic about Chuck's plight. The filmmakers don't opt for the usual happy-face Hollywood ending, but even the half-smile they provide smacks of inspirationalism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Party Girl has the courage of its own no-braininess.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The usual Sayles mix of torpor and talent prevails here.
    • New York Magazine (Vulture)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    At its best in the interludes between explosions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Our familiarity with the actors, and their comfort in this period setting, lend the piece an unexpected air of naturalism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Has some rapturously observant sequences concerning childhood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Gleeson is a wonderful actor and he keeps a lid on the blarney. He manages to convey a lot – fear, anger, compassion, rue – with only the slightest of squints and frowns. But he’s still the center of a cooked-up cavalcade of souls.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s a truism, reinforced here, that actors often are the last to comprehend how they do what they do. No matter. What they give us is all that counts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I’ve never seen a better performance – or whatever you want to call it – from a two-year-old.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Gretchen Mol is unrelentingly charming in the role and she almost - almost - makes you believe that someone as unclouded as this could actually exist. This film would go well on a double bill with "The Stepford Wives."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film, which swivels frantically between first responders, survivors, and investigators, has a percussive force, but its best scene, unbearably tense, is a quiet one, when a Chinese app designer (an excellent Jimmy O. Yang) is carjacked by the Tsarnaev brothers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Director Henry Selick is all too effective at conjuring grody ghastliness. He's less effective at giving that ghastliness a human dimension, a resonance, a reason for being beyond cheap thrills.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    With all the talk in Page One about the demise of print journalism and the rise of new media, this shiny spacious emporium seems like both a beacon and a staggering folly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What The Revenant attempts but fails to do is create a larger vision from all this survivalist mayhem. It’s a useful how-to guide for how to stay alive after a bear attack – or a human attack, for that matter – but it doesn’t soar. It crawls.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Overwritten and overcooked, Remember Me still manages a few explosive sequences between Pattinson and Pierce Brosnan.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What we get are themes and variations on previous good work, to lessening effect.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Joy
    Lawrence is terrific at playing tough, as she also demonstrated in her previous outings with Russell, “Silver Linings Playbook” and, especially, “American Hustle." But maybe it’s time for her to take a rest from him for a while. There’s a lot more to this actress than bold and brassy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Promised Land is more effective as an anti-fracking screed than as a drama. Damon has his low-key charisma and Van Sant captures the enraged anomie of the community, but, except for one big plot twist, everything in this film is telegraphed from the first frame.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Low point would be Knightley's hysterical opening sequences in which she appears to be trying to trying to contort herself into a Moebius strip. Overacting this gross can only have been enabled by a director. Didn't Cronenberg look at the rushes? Or did he think he was back in "Dead Ringers" territory?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Despite the all-too-harrowing familiarity of these scenes, they seem more like illustrations than dramatizations of trauma.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    If Hollywood must have franchises, we could do worse than one highlighting people who have lived a long life and are not on altogether friendly terms with technology. But imagine what this cast could do with something less tutti-frutti!
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film's predictability dampens its best parts. Having decided to make a movie about a dreaded subject, the filmmakers too often retreat into the comfort zone of easy assurances and flip quips.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Travolta gives a hangdog performance as the world-weary cop obsessed with rooting out the killers. Hayek and Leto share a few tart black comic moments as the film spirals into a bloodbath.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    O'Neill and Curry, both heretofore nonactors, can't put across much more than a single emotion at a time, but their amateurishness isn't as annoying as it might have been in a movie with higher aspirations and artistry.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Not quite funny enough, or serious enough, falls into the muddle middle.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What you get in Trouble with the Curve is standard-issue late-career Eastwoodiana. The growl, the snarl, the crotchetiness are already familiar to us from "Million Dollar Baby" (2004) and "Gran Torino" (2009), his last appearance as an actor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The foundation of this sympathy is Hoover's complicated sexuality. Eastwood and Black have attempted to provide Hoover with the balm he denied himself in his own lifetime. It doesn't work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    All of this has its value, but Plummer, in rollicking good form, without a shred of sentimentality, is primed for greatness, and Mills keeps cutting away from him just when things are getting interesting.

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