For 2,080 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Tale of The Princess Kaguya
Lowest review score: 0 Mixed Nuts
Score distribution:
2,080 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a major performance (Ruffalo) in a minor movie.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I wish the truly searing moments in this film were not continually counterbalanced by an overall historical-reenactment stiffness in the presentation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a filmmaker’s conceit. These filmmakers may come from Nebraska, but, from the looks of things, they don’t want to be spending much time there.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    At times the filmmakers seem to be taking potshots at Philomena for her placidity; other times Martin is made to seem crass and unfeeling – insufficiently spiritual. Life lessons are imparted, although the players never budge very much from their initial attitudes.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film suffers from late-stage Scorsese-itis – wacky, low-slung, high-octane melodrama with lots of yelling and overacting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Thompson is very good at playing imperious, and she even manages an unexpected trace of flirtiness in a few offhanded moments with Hanks.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Streep’s performance has been criticized for being too theatrical, but that’s off the mark: The character she’s playing is supposed to be theatrical. She’s a woman playing a part – the ravaged matriarch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a universal story that is also, by virtue of its very particular time and place, a singular experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The Invisible Woman at its best does justice to the complicatedness of its characters – just as Dickens did as a writer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Despite the film’s emphasis on Ryota’s transformation, the most piercing moment for me came in the scene in which his wife anguishes over her guilt in not realizing right away, as a mother, that Keita was not her birth son.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I’ve never been able to figure out if Reggio is an artist or a con artist. Perhaps, in some ways, he’s both. He has claimed in interviews that he intended to make a movie about “the wonders of the universe.” Whatever he’s made, for better or worse, I’ve never seen anything quite like it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Gloria is a starting-over story that never quite picks up a head of steam. Lelio paces the action as a series of sketches, and the hit-or-miss quality of the material makes for a bumpy ride.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s to Nathan’s credit that he doesn’t negate the allure of dirt-bike riding as an escape hatch from inner-city woes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s all fairly entertaining and eminently disposable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film works best as a straightforward melodrama set in an anything but straightforward world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I’m not sure that anybody coming to this film to witness her for the first time would necessarily pledge eternal allegiance. Still, she’s sui generis, and in the theatre world, as in life (yes, there is an overlap), that counts for a lot.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The movie doesn’t delve especially deeply into the psychology of double-agentry, and the shifting viewpoints between Israelis and Palestinians flattens the drama instead of broadening it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If we must endure yet another spring-summer cycle of comic book superheroes, this movie at least delivers the wham-bang goods (recycled though they may be).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a flurry of good gags and bad. The good ones are worth sitting around for.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Although the cast, which also includes Jennifer Jason Leigh and Christine Lahti in sharp cameos, is very good, Wiig’s performance is self-effacing to a fault. Like a lot of comic actors, she overcompensates in dramatic roles by wearing a very long face.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Jim Jarmusch has made a vampire movie, but, as you might expect, not just any old vampire movie. “Twilight” fans will not be amused, but Jarmusch’s usual coterie of art-film followers will likely find the movie his best in years.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    He uses Vacth, a beauty who somewhat resembles the young Nastassja Kinski or Dominique Sanda, for her eerie, implacable hauteur. There is a mask behind her mask.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Overlong and repetitive as it is, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, at least delivers the goods.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Words and Pictures is a minor effort from Schepisi, but minor Schepisi still trumps most of what’s out there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The ultimate feel-good movie about feeling bad. And within those limits, it succeeds all too well.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    “Séraphine” was haunting; Violette, for all its writhings, is familiar.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Rossi investigates the increasing use of massive open online courses and other flexible programs and talks to such education experts as Columbia professor Andrew Delbanco.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Braff plays Aidan with easygoing exasperation and Hudson is better than I’ve seen her since “Almost Famous.” As a director, Braff touches on lots of Big Themes: mortality, marriage, fatherhood, the disillusion of dreams. Nothing quite comes to full boil, though.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    I found it immensely touching that these women found it in themselves to keep plugging away. Despite everything, they ended their days with a measure of peace and happiness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Hoffman, bloated and flushed, does not look well in this film. But he is such a consummate actor that whatever infirmities he may have been fighting become a part of his performance. His portrayal, complete with a convincing German accent, is a fully rounded portrait of courage and dissolution.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Woody Allen’s Magic in the Moonlight is a “serious” movie attempting to be lighthearted. It deals with the same issues that Allen’s idol, Ingmar Bergman, often grappled with – namely, the battle zone of reason versus mysticism – but offhandedly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The implicit question overhanging the film: Is the political impetus to present only “positive” imagery of black people an injustice to the fullest range of their experience?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The material veers a bit too predictably from near farce to serioso dramatics but the trajectory here makes emotional sense.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What hits home is Renner’s performance, which gives full weight both to Webb’s fierce, abiding love for journalism and his despair when his livelihood – his reason for being – is trashed. It’s a tragedy, doubly so since the core of Webb’s allegations remains unchallenged today.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Too much of Wild is broken up by flashbacks that tend to dissipate rather than enhance Strayed’s trek. At times she is swallowed up almost to the point of vanishing by the immensity of the vistas.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a strange movie – simultaneously rawly realistic and airbrushed.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A kind of companion piece to Altman’s “The Long Goodbye,” and it’s the sort of failure that only a director (Paul Thomas Anderson) of his talents could make – a movie about a stoner private eye (Joaquin Phoenix) in Los Angeles circa 1970 that seems to have been concocted in a stoned haze of its very own.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a painfully uneven movie, but its best moments are ravishingly good.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Clint Eastwood’s second film this year, American Sniper, about the late Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, is considerably better than his first, “The Jersey Boys.” As a piece of direction, it’s as taut as anything he’s ever done.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The best thing about the movie is David Oyelowo’s performance as King. He doesn’t simply portray King; he inhabits him.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s a gangster movie that tries to be more than that, not always successfully. In his own small-scale way, Chandor wants to expand the reach of his vision to “Godfather” status, with Abel as his shining (tainted) knight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A standout is Ben Mendelsohn’s Aussie nutcase.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If you’ve ever fantasized about busting up somebody’s nuptials, this movie is for you.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The saving grace of Queen and Country is that its nostalgia is not laced with sentimentality. Even working in this conventional mode, Boorman doesn’t try to strong-arm us into blubberiness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's still possible to have a good time at this movie, and the primary reason is De Niro.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    iIsn't really much more than a funny, touching little squiggle, but it has a bracing honesty and pays particular heed to the betweenness in people's lives, to how much goes on when nothing seems to be going on at all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The hang-loose grodiness of these films has its charms, and the Ray-Banned team of Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, at its best, is good vaudeville.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    She sometimes falls into the same trap that Lenny Bruce fell into, playing the taboo-breaking emancipator, but for the most part she's blessedly bawdy.
    • New York Magazine (Vulture)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    If the bad guys in the real world were all this obvious, life would be a whole lot easier.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A lovely confection.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It all works on the level of a sprightly sitcom: lesbianism for the Lucy-and-Ethel crowd.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The usual Sayles mix of torpor and talent prevails here.
    • New York Magazine (Vulture)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    By continually interrupting the sequences of the adult couple with scenes of the young pair, Eyre shatters the emotional power of Dench and Broadbent.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A loose-limbed documentary about the hip-hop D.J. scene that, for know-nothings like me, is highly informative without being in the least academic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    I'm all for films that don't flow from the usual Hollywood test tubes, but A Civil Action is basically the standard formula with a dash of downbeat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Practitioners of Cajun, Creole, and zydeco music strut their stuff. So do the players of a style new to me but instantly beloved: I'm speaking of swamp pop.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    del Toro blends agit-prop politics and ghoulishness without making the entire enterprise seem silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The stage is set for a wonderful movie, and yet The Luzhin Defence, based on the Vladimir Nabokov novel The Defense, never courts greatness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    I much prefer the whacked-out, Dr. Strangelove-ish brand of political-apocalypse film to all this straitlaced you-are-there dramaturgy, which seems a throwback to the early sixties not only in time but in spirit. But what Thirteen Days sets out to do it does admirably.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Complicated thriller that gets more interesting as its complications pile up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    At its most basic level, Cast Away is a graceful and powerfully rendered survivalist saga.... And yet there's something generic about Chuck's plight. The filmmakers don't opt for the usual happy-face Hollywood ending, but even the half-smile they provide smacks of inspirationalism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Pleasingly shaggy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In The Circle, which is banned in Iran, the enforced society of women is, in effect, a community of adults treated as children.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In political terms, True Crime is a far cry from "Dirty Harry" -- it actually stands up for due process of law. In Hollywood, I believe this is known as mellowing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    His (Aoyama) existential odyssey is so attenuated and aloof that he turns suffering into an art thing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In the scenes between Hanks and Newman, we get glimpses of greatness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Evans, in effect, is the real producer here, and the film, which mostly consists of artfully blended archival footage, comes across like a last will and testament.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Costner is always at his best when he’s a little ornery, and Duvall is the same way. His grizzled performance is so thoroughly in character that he even chews as if it were 1882.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    At its best in the interludes between explosions.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    More entertaining than it has a right to be. It's pulpy and preposterous, and yet it gets at a real truth.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Arkin has a great and gentle feeling for small-time malcontents, and he knows how to make their woes our own. He does justice to the human comedy -- and redeems the movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's a pure (guilty) pleasure trip. That's pleasure, De Palma–style -- twisted, dirty, voyeuristic, a vast glissando of amorality.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Jeunet wants us to know that times are hard for dreamers and that one shouldn't pass up a chance for true love. He means it, no doubt, but he doesn't have the simplicity of soul to quite bring off the sentiment. Still, we're charmed by the attempt.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Rivette keeps the life-is-a-play metaphysics to a minimum, and the cast, including Jeanne Balibar and Sergio Castellitto, is attractive.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The emotional resolutions aren't pat, exactly. But they're not messy either, and for material this inherently volatile, that seems like a cheat.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Reygadas is both a sophisticate and a primitive: He sets up his film as a religious allegory, with the nameless painter as a kind of suffering Christ and the old woman--whose name is Ascen, as in Ascension--as his redeemer.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Max
    Noah Taylor does startlingly well by this role, but the conceit behind the film is a bizarre piece of wish-fulfillment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Great on atmosphere and less good on everything else. That’s not entirely a knock.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Breezily enjoyable but thin.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Hoffman has his specialty, though, and it’s not inappropriate here: He always looks supersmart and yet his reactions to what goes on around him are superslow.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Has some rapturously observant sequences concerning childhood.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Tends to settle for easy, homiletic insights. But it also has a collection of first-rate performances by some marvellous actresses.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As a technical achievement, K-19 is right up there with Das Boot. Don't expect much dramatic depth, though. The fathoms descended in this movie are strictly nautical.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Powerful, uneven police drama.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    One of the glummest and most forbidding thrillers ever.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As with much of Soderbergh's avant-garde work, his garde isn't quite as avant as he would have us believe it is. Still, Soderbergh's jazzed stylistics can be smartly entertaining. Without them, an uneven movie like Traffic might seem more of a mélange than it already is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In this otherwise rather schematic swatch of social catharsis, Brazil's Fernanda Montenegro gives the best performance by an actress I've seen all year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The best thing about Insomnia is that despite director Christopher Nolan's soft spot for moody-blues obfuscation, he has the good sense to keep his star in practically every shot.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A prime piece of whirlybird filmmaking, and the technique saps what might have been a powerful experience.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Eminently disposable, but that's its charm. It stays with you just long enough to make you smile.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Entertaining documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As in many a French movie, especially crime movie, the philosophe and the crook turn out to be each other’s mirror image.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Mamet doesn't take the material as far as it can go -- we're left with a pleasing fable about the battle of the sexes and the virtues of persistence in a just cause. The neatness of it all is both appealing and appalling, and perhaps this combo is what finally hooked Mamet.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Caine is burlesquing his own iconography and enjoying every minute of it. He hasn't lost his dignity, though; it takes a lot of self-possession to act this blissfully silly. He even looks good with bad teeth.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Every generation has to discover the same clichés that were drummed into previous generations, and kids could do worse than to learn them from this film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Stunning, and it has the added bonus of being about an era that is virtually new to movies. As a dramatic achievement, however, it is not quite so amazing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Disney's Lilo & Stitch, which is animated in the traditional way, with watercolor backgrounds, is lovely, and funny, too. It owes a great deal to Japanese anime, but there's also a "Looney Tunes" friskiness to it that's distinctively homegrown.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    An ungainly, intermittently harrowing omnibus filled with moments of piercing sorrow and rage.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Noé shoots his sequences in long, unbroken takes, and the unblinking horror that results is, I think, the opposite of exploitation. There has been so much lurid bloodletting in the movies that you might think nothing could faze us anymore. Think again.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A kind of psychological whodunit, but without the thrills. The clue-making is rather desultory, as if Cronenberg were indulging a narrative strategy he didn’t really care for.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Freaky Friday gives Curtis the chance to go all goofy and showcase her gift for splayed physical comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Watching this movie, you get the feeling that the Depression existed so that Seabiscuit could be memorialized.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Parts of this film are as blandly lulling as a mood tape, but at best it’s a literally soaring experience.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cory Yuen's So Close is a kind of Hong Kong martial-arts variation on the Charlie's Angels movies, only better.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Excruciatingly vivid.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A fine example of what a filmmaker can achieve when she takes on a great subject and lets it play out with all the respect and attention it deserves.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The director of "Gallipoli" and "The Year of Living Dangerously" has muffled the rage and darkness of his best work in favor of an antiquated pleasingness. Master and Commander is a too-comfy classic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cold Mountain has some marvelous, intimate moments and a real feeling, at times, for the loss that war engenders, but it also has more than its share of hokum--which would be more entertaining if the hokum were juicier.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Keys takes a scattershot approach to Cuban music, filming not only specific artists, like Los Cohibas and Los Zafiros, but also street musicians in the barrio and just about everywhere else he can find them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A pretty good documentary about a great subject.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It’s both lowdown and effete, a jamboree of whoopee jokes and sick wit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    For all its high-end ambitions, This So-Called Disaster has a tabloid-TV-like appeal: We want to see if these volatile performers get on each other's nerves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A smart little teen picture that, for a change, actually features recognizable teens.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Too much of this fantasy is filled out with artsy folderol, but it's a movie like no other--except, maybe, one by Guy Maddin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    What unites everything is Jarmusch’s playful, hang-dog absurdism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It’s an odd fable: Viktor is the mysterious visitor who shows us what the American Dream is all about--in the movie’s terms, compassion for others--without ever wanting to become an American himself. He's a spiritual twin to E.T., who also had trouble phoning home.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    More often than not, Moore goes for the guffaw, and as enjoyable as that can be, it falls short of producing the kind of devastating, in-depth analysis that might really challenge the hearts and minds of ALL audiences, left and right. At the very least, this approach undercuts the effectiveness of Moore’s own case.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The set pieces, such as an unmasked Spider-Man trying to stop a runaway subway car, are furiously scary, and compensate for all the icky mooning and moping that Peter does whenever he's questioning his gift, which is most of the time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Cunningham's depth of feeling transformed the book's premise into something beyond sniggers or camp, and the best moments in the movie, which was directed by theater veteran Michael Mayer in his film debut and adapted by Cunningham, have a similar emotional charge.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The Village is a better movie (than Signs) --probably his best since "The Sixth Sense"--but it indulges Shyamalan's penchant for messianic uplift.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The film was adapted from a 1993 novel by Robert Bober, who drew on his own childhood experiences, and as it unwinds, one begins to appreciate Deville's desire to see things work out well for these people.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    So deliriously chockablock with high-flying, color-coordinated fight scenes that non-aficionados may find it all a bit bewildering--a gorgeous abstraction. It sure is gorgeous, though, and it has a dream cast
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Taut and straightforward and a little grungy, which is how these movies ought to be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Crudup, whose features have the appropriate delicacy, plays Ned with complete conviction; it’s difficult to imagine anyone else succeeding as well.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Eastwood's earnestness has its own stoic charm. There's something nutty but also heroic in how he plays this macho-man-with-the-heart-of-a-woman premise with a straight face.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Our familiarity with the actors, and their comfort in this period setting, lend the piece an unexpected air of naturalism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In a confused world, this is a movie with answers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It can't compare to what might have been: a full-scale performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as an Irish raging bull--a rebel with a cause. There are still traces of greatness in what he attempts, and it's more than enough to make the movie worth a lingering look.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The Lost World is a smoother, scarier ride than its predecessor, with twice as many dinosaurs twice as well designed eating twice as many people...But he's not particularly playful with his terrors here, and that's a disappointment coming from a filmmaker who can mix scares and laughs the way no one else ever has.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Watching this film is a little bit like getting mauled and tickled at the same time. The filmmakers have given the whole shebang a hefty levity, and that's not easy to accomplish in a full-scale disaster movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Face/Off wouldn't work without two great actors, and it doesn't always work with them. But their gifts justify the whole loony enterprise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A true killing comedy would require a great deal more sophistication than first-time writer-director Peter Duncan brings to the party. He hasn't made a black comedy, really; it's more like a black spoof.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's a film enthralled by its own lower depths… Although Bad Lieutenant is structured as a redemptive thriller, it functions primarily as a freak show with religioso overtones. [30 Dec 1992, Calendar, p.F-7]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Their instincts as filmmakers override their instincts as moralizers. Menace II Society is best--and most shocking--when it just sets out its horrors and lets us find our own way. [26 May 1993, Calendar, p.F-1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    There's nothing much to the movie, except for the amiability of the actors and the layers of feeling Linklater provides, but that's just almost enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Russell is unusual among first-time directors in his ability to mold and shape performance. [28 Jul 1994 Pg. F2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It's sweet and winsome and a little pat, done with just enough feeling to lift it out of its class. [15 Mar 1995, Pg.F5]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The point of this film seems to be that wholesomeness is a sign of maturity, and it partially cancels out the performers. Juliet Stevenson breaks through anyway. She has a charged core, like Judy Davis, and she makes you root for her passage to happiness. [8 May 1991, p.6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Its stars, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, are on screen virtually all of the time, and they're always worth watching. But the film puts such a premium on tastefulness that it never threatens to become exciting. [23 Nov 1990]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Party Girl has the courage of its own no-braininess.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    When something heartfelt occurs in this movie, you accept it without too much squirming. The disciplined yet intuitive way in which these actors connect is a model of ensemble performance.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The young cast members, including Justin Long and Ryan Reynolds, are often spirited and funny, and restaurantgoers are left with a valuable lesson.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Harrelson does his considerable best to redeem the hackneyed role of the dreamboat do-gooder. No matter how conventional his roles may be, he always gives them a feral quality, an eccentricity, that lifts them out of the ordinary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The uneven Nine Lives has an impressive cast, but the best section features the great Mexican actress Elpidio Carrillo as a prison inmate kept from her child.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Frankly, the most disturbing thing about Prime is that Uma Thurman is now officially an Older Woman.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Despite all the heavy artistic artillery Mendes has brought to bear, his movie isn't all that far removed conceptually from "Top Gun" - which was also about military men itching for a chance to rock 'n' roll. The only difference is, "Top Gun" was unabashedly a popcorn movie while Jarhead is a box of unpopped kernels passing itself off as a full meal.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Now that it is at last on screen, my reaction is ... what's all the fuss?
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As the depraved John Wilmot, the second Earl of Rochester, Johnny Depp adds yet another sly sleazoid to his burgeoning portrait gallery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Syriana falls down at the most basic storytelling level, and this incoherence damages even the good parts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best, and perhaps the only, reason to see Duncan Tucker's Transamerica is for Felicity Huffman's touching, shape-shifting performance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Melvin Van Peebles gets the idolatrous treatment in this documentary by first-time director Joe Angio that traces his subject's career as San Francisco cable-car conductor, rap pioneer, filmmaker, Broadway producer, stockbroker, and all-around womanizer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    An actress named Moon Bloodgood, who started out as a hip-hop dancer and Laker Girl before getting into movie and TV work, plays a bush pilot and sometime girlfriend of Jerry's. The role is bland but that name is great.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    If Freedomland reminds you of Spike Lee's "Clockers," that's not by accident. Like that film, it's adapted by Richard Price from his novel and is set in the neighboring Northern New Jersey communities of Dempsy, predominantly poor and African-American, and the largely white blue-collar suburb of Gannon.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is meandering and highly uneven, but Robert Downey Jr. is truly oddball as a venomous drama critic, and watching that ball once again roll through Bill Buckner's legs is torture (for Red Sox fans anyway).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Most Mafia movies are unduly sympathetic, but this one takes the cake. Peter Dinklage is excellent as the mob's chief lawyer.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Judged on any kind of rational level, this film is a mess, and Fairuza Balk, as a punky friend of Howard's son, gives the single most annoying performance I have ever seen. But Franz Lustig's cinematography has a Walker Evans-like power.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In Sidney Lumet's "Dog Day Afternoon," which only looks better with the years, New York was as much a character in that film as its people. It was a movie that took its cue from the energy of the city. The Inside Man takes its cue mostly from other movies.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Blethyn, as Frank's wife, is less high-strung than usual, which is a boon.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best reason to check the film out is Ejiofor's performance, which is packed with grace and wit and pathos.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Gretchen Mol is unrelentingly charming in the role and she almost - almost - makes you believe that someone as unclouded as this could actually exist. This film would go well on a double bill with "The Stepford Wives."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best parts of the movie are its occasional animated sequences.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What keeps the film watchable, aside from the vibrant musical numbers in the nightclub, is Garcia's obvious love for the Cuba of his ancestors, of his dreams. A lot goes wrong in this overlong movie, but it has a human touch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Art School Confidential mostly just makes you feel bad - period. It puts you in a foul mood and leaves you there.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's asking too much of Ratner to impart some kind of visionary flourish to the proceedings. But without it, these comic-book movies all tend to look the same.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    May be accurate around the edges, but at its heart it's a fairy tale.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The movie's gross-out effects are impressive but wearying. How apt that the director's name is Gore.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    When Cohen and Ferrell are eyeing each other, you never saw a loopier pair.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The actors, who portray a reunion that is more sparring match than love fest, strike occasional sparks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    An overly stately affair that often substitutes production values for imagination.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    If a movie that uses the word "relationship" 7,000 times puts your teeth on edge, stay away.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Compared to "Capote," this new film is altogether lighter.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Messrs. Iñárritu and Arriaga have played this card one too many times. If they really want to appear radical the next time out, my advice is: Tell a single story and tell it well. What a concept.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There's something foul about staging the assassination of a sitting president in order to push a political agenda that could just as easily have been put forward without resorting to such sensationalism.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Because Crowe is hamstrung by his role, he never strikes the requisite sparks with Cotillard. This is quite an achievement, since her beauty is on par with Provence's.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Like Jim Carrey, Ferrell seems to think that the way to be taken seriously as a dramatic actor is to drain himself of everything that audiences love about him.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Much more silly than romantic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Garner is good, and so is Brian Dennehy as a crusty ranch owner; Abigail Breslin, playing a leukemia patient, demonstrates that she was not a one-note wonder in "Little Miss Sunshine."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Whether this is all a case of life imitating art or vice versa matters little. Few of these movies aspire to art. What counts is the trajectory of uplift.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Director Alexandra Lipsitz doesn't do much more than chronicle the noise, but it's intermittently fun stuff.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Perfect Stranger is far from Hitchcock, and Berry, although she gets an A for effort, can't do much with the half-baked characterizations.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Travolta gives a hangdog performance as the world-weary cop obsessed with rooting out the killers. Hayek and Leto share a few tart black comic moments as the film spirals into a bloodbath.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Far from a flop, and I'm sure the Spider-maniacs will eat it up. For me, it's a buffet without much aftertaste.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Hartley is very adept with actors, though – or at least some of them. Posey, for her part, displays a pert quizzical quality that's very charming and very funny. And Goldblum is tailor-made for Hartley's minimalist patter.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Depp and Rush are still in there plugging away. They’re troupers, but the series is all used up. If there is to be another sequel it will have to be called "Pirates of the Caribbean – At Wit's End."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's a modest film in most respects, but Albert Finney as Alfie is a man of great importance indeed, reminding us again that he's one of the most towering talents in film today.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As summer franchise superhero flicks go, it's tolerable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's all a lot closer to melodrama than drama, but Thalbach is a dynamo.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Too much of Sunshine is like a cross between a middling "Alien" movie and "Solaris" (the woozy Steven Soderbergh version).
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's movie-making as match-making.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Ratner, who has been accurately dubbed a "fauxteur," does an OK job keeping the action swirling, especially in the finale atop the Eiffel Tower.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At times this indie is as repetitive and self-indulgent as its protagonist, but it captures a bit of the madness of being unrequitedly in love.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    By skewing the film into a father-son inspirational saga, the filmmakers sell out the best possibilities in their material. Lurie clearly wants Resurrecting the Champ to be "more" than a sports movie, or a newspaper movie. Ironically, he ends up with less.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Taymor's flower-powery phantasmagoria is ambitious but ultimately tiresome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Cronenberg has a distinctive style – deadpan absurdism laced with fright and all executed with slow deliberation. But too much of Eastern Promises is cultish and silly.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As the movie moves through its murder mystery mode and begins racking up political points, Hank becomes a stand-in for all those Americans bewildered and beleaguered by the war. He becomes a Symbol.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Most of the love in Feast of Love is unrequited, untapped, or unfulfilled. The fine cast, which includes Jane Alexander, Selma Blair, and Radha Mitchell, is also somewhat underused.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The filmmakers's attempts to balance out the gung-ho shoot-'em-ups with an overlay of "fairness" are rudimentary. The movie works us into a frenzy of righteous revenge, it makes us cheer each kill by the FBI warriors, and then it tells us that this violence only breeds more violence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Set in Japanese-occupied Shanghai during World War II, Ang Lee's uneven new film is a bit like a Chinese variant on Paul Verhoeven's "The Black Book." The sex scenes in this otherwise overly prim period piece are extremely graphic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Without the steadfast intelligence of Clooney's performance, Michael Clayton wouldn't work half as well as it does.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Smith, it should be noted, has compared Neville in interviews to Job. Tone down the highfalutin references. In the end, this is a sci-fi zombie movie, folks.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What we get are themes and variations on previous good work, to lessening effect.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There is a great movie to be made about the first stirrings of rock 'n' roll. Honeydripper is not that film, but it certainly whets your appetite for it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Cao Hamburger works well with child actors and has a spare, unforced style. But too much of this film is desultory and thin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    A faltering attempt at black comedy mixed with romantic melodrama, Married Life is always on the verge of being interesting but never quite gets there.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The filmmakers are smart enough – or cynical enough – to realize that we don't watch movies like Under the Same Moon in order to be surprised. We go to them for a good cry.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What we're left with is outrage in a vacuum. It's impossible to separate out the stop-loss tactic from the misadventures of the war itself, and that's what this film, to its discredit, accomplishes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    My only regret is that the film could not somehow take a leap forward to 1988. I would love to have seen what Lee and Will could do with "Die Hard."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Some of the set pieces are ravishing, more often they're ravishingly clunky.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Turn the River becomes a standard fatalistic misfits-on-the-run movie with more than its share of improbabilities. It's as if Eigeman didn't realize how good the best parts of his film were, and so went ahead and trashed them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At times, the movie resembled nothing so much as Kabuki with Cosmos.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    We are treated to all manner of worshipy recollections from a stable of Thompson's admirers, including, believe it or not, Patrick Buchanan and James Baker. Who said gonzo politics doesn't make for strange bedfellows?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Like much reality TV, sections of American Teen seem patently staged, or coached, for the camera.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Was Maher afraid he might muddy his clownish jape if he actually brought into the mix a learned theologian?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The conceit here is that if a boy and a girl love the same music, that means they're in love. Who am I to argue with such poetic whimsy?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Like all too many docs these days, it chronicles a contest while caricaturing the contestants.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Eastwood gets all noirish for us but, like Jolie's performance, there's a rote quality to it all. Even the mournful little ditties that Eastwood composed for the soundtrack seem canned.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The entire film has the glibness of a music video. Boyle has managed to make dire poverty seem glossy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    A heavy dose of corn syrup. Director Darren Aronofsky's herky-jerky, hand-held camera stylistics have a veneer of verity, but don't be fooled. This pastiche, written by Robert Siegel, is purest Hollywood.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At worst is inoffensive. But that's the point. When you're making a movie about people whose lives are torn up in this way, inoffensiveness is, well, offensive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Jenkins has an admirable feeling for, as the French would say, mise en scène, and a gift for placing actors in naturalistic settings. What he lacks at this point is a strong story sense.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Director Henry Selick is all too effective at conjuring grody ghastliness. He's less effective at giving that ghastliness a human dimension, a resonance, a reason for being beyond cheap thrills.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What it's mainly about is movie stars skittering from locale to locale while bullets whiz by and the plot thickens – or, more to the point, curdles.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    An OK action film, but only the humorless will find it heretical – or educational.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best thing to come out of Sunshine Cleaning is the confirmation that Adams, one of Hollywood's most delightful comediennes, is also capable of piercing drama.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is deliberately old-fashioned in its approach; the story line is resolutely linear and the production values are deluxe. It all makes for a fairly enjoyable, if schematic, backstage extravaganza.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The movie, starring Rogen as a mall cop with anger management issues, is essentially a goony romp flecked with disturbing eruptions of violence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This love letter to Valentino from director Matt Tyrnauer seems intended for the already smitten.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There are many things wrong with Julie and Julia but, if you're looking to get hitched, you won't find a better booster.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Because we know almost from the get-go that things will turn out bad-to-bittersweet for them, the movie is like one long autopsy of what went wrong, starting with Day No. 488.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Lee has always had an affinity for innocence and an abiding affection for outcasts, and both traits serve him well in Taking Woodstock -- but only up to a point. Beyond that point, where sanctification meets reality, the film floats up, up, and away.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Not quite funny enough, or serious enough, falls into the muddle middle.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film's one extraordinary aspect, which makes it well worth seeing despite its carefully coiffed shagginess, is Maya Rudolph's performance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Could have used a lot more grit. Without it, we're left with a crime movie fantasia that slips all too easily into the ether.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Whereas the original, directed by Joseph Sargent, was essentially a well-oiled B movie, the new incarnation, directed by Tony ("Enemy of the State") Scott, is bristling with high-tech gimcrackery and over-the-top camera flourishes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Although his movie often resembles the kind of promotional video one might find as an extra on a concert DVD, N'Dour in full throttle is a sight, and sound, to behold.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    No one else in Inglourious Basterds comes close to Landa for sheer charisma.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's all kind of silly and amorphous, but the scenes between Yi and Cera, whether or not they were scripted, have a babes-in-the-wood loveliness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Anonyma stands out in A Woman in Berlin not only because of her ragged nobility but also because, alas, Färberböck has surrounded her with a gaggle of Berliners who seem right out of Central Casting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What the film is saying, so far as I can tell, is that, if cut, you will bleed. And bleed. As the vampire's kindred Seven Deadly Sinner, wild-haired Kim Ok-vin looks like she's having a high old time.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At around the halfway point the film takes an intriguing swerve, as Kyle is canonized and Lance is unexpectedly launched into celebrityhood. Flashes of deadpan outrageousness occasionally redeem the dourness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Washington doesn’t look as if he’s having much fun, and who can blame him? Perhaps he agrees with me: Apocalypse movies, like apocalypse heroes, need some laughs, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Oswalt captures the rabidness of the die-hard fan, the kind you can hear at any moment on the sports talk shows.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Cloud 9 may not be my idea of a great movie, but it doesn't pretend that old folks are, by definition, sexless. In the movie business, this qualifies as a revolution.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As it is, The Maid is a study of a character who rarely emerges from the opaque end of the spectrum.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Uma Thurman looks frumpy in Motherhood. This is the only pressing reason to see it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Invictus has an understated grace, but too often it comes across as hero-worshipy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s a dirgelike odyssey sparked by Julianne Moore’s overheated turn as George’s best friend – a welcome respite from Firth’s clenched emoting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Deft and fast-moving, but shouldn’t a musical have at least a few songs you can hum on your way home?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The Karate Kid will probably work best for young audiences unaware of its predecessor – or of much of anything else for that matter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is never less than intelligent and never more than accomplished.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Téchiné's movies are always worth seeing, and The Girl on the Train, for all its faults, has moments that resonate
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The whole thing is piffle, but it moves fast enough to stay entertaining.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Overwritten and overcooked, Remember Me still manages a few explosive sequences between Pattinson and Pierce Brosnan.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As Leonard, Nivola isn’t bad, which is good, since the entire movie revolves around him.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Aside from these two actors (Downey/Rourke), Iron Man 2 isn’t much of a whoop-de-do.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Something is going on all the time, even if that something is oftentimes clumsy, nonsensical, or flat. But the sheer whoosh of the story line keeps you watching anyway.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    All this is mighty silly, but there's something to be said for watching a French movie that, for a change, isn't about l'amour, existential angst, or madness. It's oddly reassuring to know that Hollywood isn't the only place where dithery, disposable spy spoofs are manufactured.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    For the literal-minded, there’s an added bonus: Johnny Cash singing Solitary Man over the opening credits.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Brand can seem simultaneously randy and strung-out and is often very funny. Hill is surprisingly touching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    O'Neill and Curry, both heretofore nonactors, can't put across much more than a single emotion at a time, but their amateurishness isn't as annoying as it might have been in a movie with higher aspirations and artistry.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    A little of Solondz's deadpan creepiness goes a long way with me. Life During Wartime is about how people are not what they seem to be, but most of its characters aren't rich enough to exhibit single, let alone double, lives.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Resembles nothing so much as a workmanlike TV crime thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It wants to be a movie about the intersection between criminality and the class system but, for that, it could have used a bit more class.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Is Jack, who is patterned on a real-life character, sociopathic or just plain clueless? Gallo doesn't seem to care. He cares about parading before us lowlifes living the high life.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The rural atmosphere is well wrought and so is the depiction of phony evangelism – but it all devolves into the usual heebie-jeebies by the end.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The humor is broad, the jokes not of the first freshness, and the cast, especially Bousdoukus, is hammy. And, for the record, the upscale menu, which is supposed to be scrumptious, doesn't look as tasty as the downscale one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is provocative but also scattershot and not nearly as conclusive as it pretends to be. The almost complete absence of naysayers in any of the sections is a tip-off that the game is rigged.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Your heart goes out to all these kids, but Guggenheim's take on education stacks the deck against them even further by implying that only charters offer a ray of hope. Would that it were that simple.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    RED
    RED is a poisoned valentine to the CIA, and that approach, too, is in keeping with its cold-war sentimentality.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Despite the all-too-harrowing familiarity of these scenes, they seem more like illustrations than dramatizations of trauma.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Michael Apted's direction veers into listlessness, but there is, at times, a pleasing elegance to the production, too. It doesn't assault you. Small favors are better than none.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As a testament to positive thinking, 127 Hours will probably stand as a ringing affirmation for reckless survivalists. For those of us not so affirmed, Boyle's paean to heroism – a better title for it might have been "A Farewell to Arm" – is merely the best gross-out music video ever made.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's more than enough that the Wilsons were punished and pilloried for telling the truth. We don't need to see them sanctified by righteousness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I would rather have seen a documentary about the real women instead of this workmanlike dramatic rendition.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In its final half-hour, all the stops are pulled. The movie is still wildly implausible but at least it's hurtling forward. The only thing missing from the proceedings is a windmill for John to tilt at.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Only Amy Adams, playing Mickey's tough-tender girlfriend Char­lene, manages to be convincingly working-class without seeming either dopey or rabid or strung-out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Love & Other Drugs is a slick weepie made by smart guys who want you to know they're better than the schlockmeisters. They've outsmarted themselves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    No doubt some of it is charming enough to induce giggles in its preteen target audience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Best when it's morphing into seriousness. Too often the comic bits seem like sops to the audience.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Too often the sequences in this movie play out like snatches from a terrific play that somehow got lost along the way.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film isn't helped by Kline's cameo, although his comic timing is impeccable. The problem is that what he's timing – the role of an aging ego-swelled roué – is very tired stuff.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Although the filmmakers try to avoid roteness, the conflicts tend to play out along circumscribed lines. This gives the film a seesaw sameness. It's all a bit too diagrammed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Essentially three movies in one: The staged reenactment of Columbus's expedition, the filming of that staged expedition, and the contemporary local uprising. It's a lot to bite off, especially since Bollaín's budget doesn't seem to be much larger than Sebastián's.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    He was the Beatles of the hair business.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's an omnisexual variation on François Truffaut's "Jules and Jim," although stylistically, with its emphases on hipper-than-thou attitudes and moody-blues visuals, it's much closer to the early work of Jean-Luc Godard and Wong Kar-Wai.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Wilson has a gawky affability here that helps redeem much that might otherwise seem tasteless (as opposed to tasteless-but-funny).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The happy endings in "HTYMP," as sweet as they are to experience, seem more engineered than inevitable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Capotondi keeps circling his movie in and out of dream states and waking states as the whodunit morphs into who-cares-who-dunit?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Essentially The Conspirator is a courtroom drama with occasional bulletins from the outside world. It plays out to its predictable end with the doggedness, if not the verve, of a "Law and Order" episode.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's certainly not a "breakthrough" comedy, unless the breakthrough is that women will flock to slobby, heartfelt romps starring Kristin Wiig instead of Seth Rogen. It's progress, sort of.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Better than bland but never quite rises above the level of a pretty good TV movie of the week.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    An oddly discursive documentary that is, ultimately, more about Pierre Bergé, his companion and business partner of 50 years.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    All of this has its value, but Plummer, in rollicking good form, without a shred of sentimentality, is primed for greatness, and Mills keeps cutting away from him just when things are getting interesting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's also a mistake, I think, to have Oliver and Jordana be so emotionally flat. No doubt Ayoade was reaching for a hipper-than-thou vibe here, but their inexpressiveness is more annoying than cool.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In Beautiful Boy, Ku manages to take a new-to-movie subject and flatten it into something that, despite its harrowing contours, is often grindingly familiar.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Switching between the 1950s, the '60s, and the present, it's compelling in a middling miniseries kind of way – expansive but not terribly deep.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's not only light, it's thin. It's self-deprecating to a fault. Reynolds is required to practically wink at the audience, as if to say,"I know this looks silly."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Has its lewd funniness, though not often enough to make it worthy of not only "Bad Santa" but, more to the point, "School of Rock."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Marginally better than its predecessor, but the same problem still remains: Cars just aren't very interesting as anthropomorphic animation vehicles (pun intended).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    With all the talk in Page One about the demise of print journalism and the rise of new media, this shiny spacious emporium seems like both a beacon and a staggering folly.

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