For 2,436 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
Lowest review score: 0 I Now Pronounce You Chuck & Larry
Score distribution:
2436 movie reviews
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Despite its deficiencies, and the inadequate screen time allotted to Theron (who's quite good), Sleepwalking has a core of feeling. It's about a do-gooder who, lacking all skills for it, does good anyway. His emotional odyssey has real poignancy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Sadly, it lacks the classic awfulness that might have lifted it into the pantheon of Truly Bad Movies. Instead, what we have here is a garden variety bad movie, of which there have been all too many lately.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This intermittently terrific cerebral thriller does, indeed, hinge on the proper use of dictionary definitions, but the film is really about the oppressive blahness of small-town, postcommunist Romania. In such surroundings, parsing definitions can almost stand for high drama.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    Gets points for oddness. Excellence is another matter.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    LaBute is attacking our society’s obsession with the surface of things, whether it be a painter’s canvas or a human one, but his drama is, in itself, relentlessly superficial.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's been a while since we've had a good monster movie, and while Cloverfield probably won't give you sleepless nights, it will certainly keep you awake in the theater.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A high-class weepie for adults who disdain the lower forms of four-hankiedom.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Oswalt captures the rabidness of the die-hard fan, the kind you can hear at any moment on the sports talk shows.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The battle scenes and a few of the human vignettes are powerful, but too often the film falls back on conventional plot mechanics.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Another charmless Hollywood thriller.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    The Golden Compass is a blatant attempt to duplicate the success of the "Harry Potter" franchise. The only thing missing is richly imagined characters, a comprehensible story line, good acting, and satisfying special effects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Although the film, for the most part, is told from the perspective of the IRA, it does not blithely take its side.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The philosophic notions in I Love Huckabees are ultimately not much more than window dressing for some fancy slapstick.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    If, as the ads would lead you to believe, you go to see The Break-Up expecting a romantic comedy, you will be severely disappointed. If you go to it expecting a good movie, you will also be severely disappointed.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This computer-animated feature is consistently inventive, if a bit busy and overlong.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Neither terrible nor excellent; Hayek, who also co-produced, may have obsessed for years about this project, but the result is a fairly standard this-happened-and-that-happened biopic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    The film becomes cumulatively stranger as it goes along, and it has a lulu of a kicker.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The best thing about Insomnia is that despite director Christopher Nolan's soft spot for moody-blues obfuscation, he has the good sense to keep his star in practically every shot.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Berri is very good at bringing out his characters' emotional contradictions so that we seem to be discovering them right along with Jacques and Laura.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's a good thing that this movie has so many crisscrossing subplots. If one gaggle of whiners gets on your nerves, rest assured the scenery will soon change and another will take center stage.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Bong's style is comically tart even in the film's most noirish moments.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Rainer
    The people who made this movie have either seen too much mayhem -- or they haven't seen any.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best parts of the movie are its occasional animated sequences.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    Life imitates art, except there’s precious little of either here.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Just because Cole Porter's biography was botched and airbrushed in "Night and Day," starring Cary Grant, doesn't mean De-Lovely, which is up-front about Porter's homosexuality, is a whole lot better.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The best moments in “Parnassus” are not otherwordly but worldly. It’s a movie about a dying magician and the death of magic. This is a subject that obviously means a lot to Gilliam, and he makes us feel it in our bones.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Halfway through the movie, I decided a better title for this weepie contraption would be “The Hurt Letter.”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I wanted to be transported by this movie; I wasn't quite. But I respect it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What goes on inside the mind of a terrorist who is willing to blow himself for the cause? The War Within is one of the few films that attempts to deal with this subject in a nonexploitative way.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Too eager to please to be truly dislikable, and Roberts and Cusack have a fine rapport.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Some of the set pieces are ravishing, more often they're ravishingly clunky.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fortunately, there are more than enough moments when the heavy-handedness gives way to the sheer bliss of ordinary magic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    It occurred to me that Emmerich and Co. might be playing this whole thing for laughs. It probably occurred to them, too.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Harrelson does his considerable best to redeem the hackneyed role of the dreamboat do-gooder. No matter how conventional his roles may be, he always gives them a feral quality, an eccentricity, that lifts them out of the ordinary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Mos Def makes it work. It's a truly daring piece of acting because it skirts racial stereotyping and is so out of key with everything else in the movie. But that's just why it is so good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    When Cohen and Ferrell are eyeing each other, you never saw a loopier pair.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This film would be better if it wasn't so slick. Still, parts of it are enjoyably shaggy, and Hopkins is very endearing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The timing is slack and the jokes repetitive. But, like most Will Ferrell movies, it has enough riotous moments to carry you through the dull stretches.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    One of the most dreamily unsettling documentaries ever made.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    Kim exalts nature--life’s passage--without stooping to sentimentality. He sees the tooth and claw, and he sees the transcendence. Whether this is a Buddhist attribute, I cannot say, but the impression this movie leaves is profound: Here is an artist who sees things whole.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    This thinly autobiographical gangsta odyssey never achieves liftoff, and Jackson is unconvincing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    There has to be a good reason to put yourself through yet another junkie odyssey and Candy flunks the test.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    This ghastly swatch of pulp horror is compelling at the most basic level, but so little is going on in it that you might as well be watching a sadistic lab experiment performed on mice.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's all a lot closer to melodrama than drama, but Thalbach is a dynamo.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The Hong Kong director Wong Kar Wai has an undeservedly high reputation as a master stylist. He's more like a master window dresser.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Watching it is like getting a peek behind the curtain. But it's frustrating, too, because the casting of Emadeddin as a murderer-in-the-making precludes any psychological depth. And as an indictment of social inequality, which is the film's calling card, Panahi inadvertantly makes a far better case for the haves than for the have-nots.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    If you're the kind of moviegoer who likes puzzling out the plots of insoluble movies, then by all means rush to see Stay, a great big blurry mess.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    What actors! The great Miriam Margolyes has a wonderful cameo as a scullery maid, and Colin Firth manfully endures a face full of frosting. And then there's Angela Lansbury, playing her first movie role in 20 years as the villainous Aunt Adelaide.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    What begins as a twisted sex romp turns film noir-ish. Guthe is so anxious to show us what a larcenous tramp Mini is that he never shows us any other sides to her.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Field made a thriller about what we are capable of in the name of hatred -- and of love.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    At its best, the film compares favorably to its obvious antecedents, "Rififi" (which Melville once hoped to direct) and "The Asphalt Jungle."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    The personal triumphs in Happy-Go-Lucky may be small-scale but its embrace is all-encompassing. It's a wonderfully humane movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Dews perhaps makes too much of the notion that Allis was a woman out of her time – a feminist precursor. This is too sociological a formulation for such a patently psychological crisis.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    The scene is so emotionally ravishing that it breaks you apart. The peacefulness that finally descends on Séraphine in the film's final moments is more than a balm. It's a benediction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Like all good noirs, it has an almost comic appreciation for how the best-laid plans can go horribly wrong. No matter how bad things get, they can always get worse. I watched the film in a state of rapt enjoyment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    Glenconner is such a class-conscious caricature that he doesn't need the filmmakers to do him in; he does a sterling job all by himself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Destined to become this year's love-it-or-hate-it movie. Is it OK to say I merely liked it a lot?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Reygadas is both a sophisticate and a primitive: He sets up his film as a religious allegory, with the nameless painter as a kind of suffering Christ and the old woman--whose name is Ascen, as in Ascension--as his redeemer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Harry comes through loud and clear as a conflicted, edgy, avid young man. He's turned into EveryTeen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The animation is consistently sporty and there are some choice comic riffs on martial arts movies.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Reilly is a good foil for Ferrell, but too many of their scenes together have the effect of improv night at the comedy club.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Terrifying precisely because it doesn't go in for cheesy shock tactics and special effects. (Those sharks are REAL.)
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    The film's Russians are all played by French and Australian actors. Too bad Butterworth didn't find a Russian to play the Brit. That would have made the inauthenticity complete.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Exhaustingly action-packed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Obviously a movie made by smart and talented people but sometimes you can outsmart yourself.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Worth seeing for the expert archival selections, but a decidedly mixed bag for anyone familiar, or unfamiliar, with the times.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It's intermittently amusing, and Bening actually gives a performance instead of a star turn, but the claws should have been sharper.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Roth's deep-dish introspection would be difficult for any movie to achieve, but with the right cast and more passion, we might have been pulled right into Coleman's psychic prison. The Human Stain isn't a movie of ideas, and it's too inert to be a probing character study. No stain is left behind, just a wan watermark.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    He doesn’t entirely succeed, but the attempt has poignancy: As uneven as much of his recent work has been, Bertolucci's still in love with the movies, and his ardor--if not always the ends he puts it to--is exhilarating.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Invictus has an understated grace, but too often it comes across as hero-worshipy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    What we're getting in this movie isn't necessarily better; it's just more.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The movie has a lush mysteriousness that represents a bygone, almost antique style of romanticism. It bears almost no resemblance to the current crop of mostly rat-a-tat movies. To view it is to enter a time warp, and there is some pleasure in stepping back into the languor.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Perfect Stranger is far from Hitchcock, and Berry, although she gets an A for effort, can't do much with the half-baked characterizations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Devotees of the "Whole Earth Catalogue" may regard this film as a nostalgia trip, but it's much more comprehensive, more forward-looking than that.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    By making Nacho a do-gooder, Hess defuses Black's subversive energy. You could argue that Black also played a do-gooder in "School of Rock," but the kids in that film were a lot spunkier, and Black wasn't constantly playing for sympathy as he does here.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    In a movie with so much graphic suffering by innocent Africans, it’s a bit disconcerting that so much loving attention is paid to Bruce Willis’s anguished mug. There’s an uncomfortable Great White Father (and Mother) aspect to this movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    The script, instead of being what we tolerate in order to savor the visuals, is a delight all by itself.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The problem is, the geek in question, at least as Jesse Eisenberg plays him, doesn't have the emotional expansiveness to fill out a movie. Perhaps sensing this, the filmmakers play out the story line from multiple points of view and crowd the stage with a pageant of voluble supporting characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    In Aviva Kempner's affectionate documentary Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg, Berg, who once polled second only to Eleanor Roosevelt as one of America's most respected females, is given her due. Or at least her showbiz due.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    In much the same way that Godard used heroines like Anna Karina or Bardot, Toback showcases Campbell's face as a placard of unknowability--a quality he recognizes as inherently feminine. The (inadvertent) question we are left with is, How much is there to know about her anyway?
    • 21 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    On the reasonable assumption that no movie featuring an Elvis impersonator can be wholly bad, I was prepared for a high old time at 3000 Miles to Graceland, which exhibits a plenitude of Elvi. The exhibition does not last very long, however. Less than a third of the way through, the filmmakers jettison the premise and trash their own movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    There are some virtuoso moments (the discovery of the mutilated corpse is extremely well done and blessedly ungraphic), but overall the result is much less than prime De Palma.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    In all, it's a fun exercise in nostalgia but a three-hour homage to grade Z movies is a long sit. Grunge overload sets in early.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The point of this film seems to be that wholesomeness is a sign of maturity, and it partially cancels out the performers. Juliet Stevenson breaks through anyway. She has a charged core, like Judy Davis, and she makes you root for her passage to happiness. [8 May 1991, p.6]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The conceit of the movie is that everyone is obsessed by something and never really tunes into anybody else.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    "In the Company of Men," "Your Friends & Neighbors," and "The Shape of Things," at least held you. Possession piddles away as you're watching it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This love letter to Valentino from director Matt Tyrnauer seems intended for the already smitten.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    An amazing, galvanic experience. It's about the hushed-up story of Benito Mussolini's first wife and child, but no one will ever mistake this movie for a standard biopic. It's too raw, too primal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    This movie is a one-of-a-kind experience – blarney carried to rhapsodic heights.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The only genuine moments of emotion come not from the lead actresses but from that great trouper Blythe Danner.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Good contributes very little to a conundrum that has occupied historians and psychologists for half a century.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Judging from this film, a pop cultural resurgence in Afghanistan seems ultimately unstoppable, even with a resurgent Taliban, if for no other reason than that 60 percent of the population is under 21. Also, this is a country, as we see again and again, that loves to sing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The real love story here is between Moore and his bullhorn.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If you are not already familiar with Williams’s best plays and film adaptations, this musty magnolia of a movie won’t encourage you to seek them out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The Mexican writer-director Fernando Eimbcke attempts to give this story a melancholy overlay, but its main interest is in its confirmation that teenagers are pretty much the same everywhere.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Barrymore pulls off the neatest trick of the year: She makes all this pop schlock matter.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    Why do filmmakers persist in remaking films that were already great to begin with? Why not instead remake bad movies that had terrific premises?
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    Driven is recommended only to those gentle souls who want to know what it looks like to crash into a wall at 200 mph.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Crystal Skull is a fun ride, but if we have to wait 19 years for the next one, that's OK by me.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I'd be more inclined to call this French dysfunctional family epic gabby and preeningly self-indulgent – in a word, annoying.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    It's all so resolutely uninspired that even the kids in the audience may want to duck out.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    This unrated documentary, which contains no hard-core shots, could have used more hog and less hedge, if you catch my drift: When Jeremy drones on about his quest to be cast in mainstream movies, dullness sets in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    DiCaprio's performance is a revelation only for those who have underestimated him. In Scorsese's previous films, "The Gangs of New York" and "The Aviator," he seemed callow and miscast, but here he has the presence of a full-bodied adult. He's grown into his emotions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Ray Lawrence, well regarded for his two previous films, "Bliss" and "Lantana," expands Carver's work into an indictment of colonialism and an examination of the chasm that supposedly exists between men and women over matters of the heart.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    Belzberg doesn't intervene during the moments of violence, believing that the film can force social change only by showing the worst. If she is correct, then this film should move mountains.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Too much of Sunshine is like a cross between a middling "Alien" movie and "Solaris" (the woozy Steven Soderbergh version).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Essentially two movies for the price of one. But those halves add up to more than most movies right now.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    All in all, a harrowing, one-of-a-kind movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What keeps the film watchable, aside from the vibrant musical numbers in the nightclub, is Garcia's obvious love for the Cuba of his ancestors, of his dreams. A lot goes wrong in this overlong movie, but it has a human touch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    An exuberantly garish French movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    Spellbindingly original -- Like the wild orchid, Adaptation is a marvel of adaptation, entwined with its hothouse environment and yet stunningly unique.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Without her (Kelly Macdonald), the generally well-acted The Merry Gentleman would descend into terminal lugubriousness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    This is certainly the grubbiest Holmes in movie history.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Contact sure is pretentious. It doesn't deliver on the deepthink, and it lacks the charge of good, honest pulp. It's schlock without the schlock.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    The Lost World is a smoother, scarier ride than its predecessor, with twice as many dinosaurs twice as well designed eating twice as many people...But he's not particularly playful with his terrors here, and that's a disappointment coming from a filmmaker who can mix scares and laughs the way no one else ever has.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    Excess Baggage, Alicia Silverstone's first feature from her First Kiss Productions, turns out to be a rather shaggy and uninvolving jaunt.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The entire enterprise ultimately seems designed to turn Austen into a self-help guru.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Mongol is a throwback to a more respectable tradition. The largeness of its scope arises naturally from the material, not the budget. The movie earns its stature.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    The novelist Cormac McCarthy was served well by the Coen Brothers' adaptation of his novel "No Country for Old Men" but comes a cropper in The Road, a lugubrious trek through postapocalyptic debris.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Best performance, minute for minute, comes from Adriane Lenox, whose cameo as Michael's drug-addled mother is the film's standout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Carrell has stated in interviews that his accent "falls someplace between Bela Lugosi and Ricardo Montalban," and that's about right.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    “Twilight” is essentially an adolescent female fantasia about coming to terms with one’s sexuality. There I’ve said it. And I’m sure no one else has ever said it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The veteran rock musician Nick Cave wrote the screenplay and John Hillcoat directed, both somewhat in thrall to Sam Peckinpah. The bonds of family are the centerpiece of this highly uneven, hyperviolent film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's a modest film in most respects, but Albert Finney as Alfie is a man of great importance indeed, reminding us again that he's one of the most towering talents in film today.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Powerful, uneven police drama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Noé shoots his sequences in long, unbroken takes, and the unblinking horror that results is, I think, the opposite of exploitation. There has been so much lurid bloodletting in the movies that you might think nothing could faze us anymore. Think again.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Given the decibel level of this movie, it's a miracle that these guys were able to give creditable performances. To give you an idea of the magnitude of the achievement: Imagine delivering a stirring rendition of the Gettysburg Address while standing under Niagara Falls.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Rothemund's use of the recorded testimony, while it gives his film a startling veracity, also limits his imagination. It prevents him from delving too deeply into the psychology of these activists.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Over time, though, with films such as "Lost Highway" and, to a lesser extent, "Mulholland Drive," Lynch's movies became less personal and more private. Whatever he is working out in his new film, Inland Empire, it's beyond the reach of all but his idolators.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    It's camp noir, but the director, Renny Harlin, doesn't allow the jokes, feeble as they are, to take hold. He slam-bangs the action as if he was prepping "Die Hard 2," so that even Clay's self-infatuated strut and bleary leer don't have time to register. The film is pointlessly souped up. [11 Jul 1990, p.1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    McCarthy is so careful not to take a political stand that his film seems neutered by good intentions. In the spirit of squishy humanism, he soft-pedals a hard-hitting topic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Ballast lacks ballast. Much praised by aficionados of minimalist indie cinema – hey, who needs a plot when you've got mood? – it's a wearying slog through anomie in a Mississippi Delta township.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is never less than intelligent and never more than accomplished.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    His drug-smuggling underworld, specifically the Amsterdam-New York connection, is likewise drably depicted. Is this because director Kevin Asch and screenwriter Antonio Macia deliberately played it down, or are they just incompetent? I’ll be charitable and vote for the former, but sometimes sensationalism is preferable to being altogether unsensational.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    The lifelong friends in Fred Schepisi's marvelous Last Orders actually seem like lifelong friends.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This film is apolitical in the best sense - it bears witness to a time and a place.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    This is the loopiest star vehicle in ages.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    Ends with a bunch of goofy outtakes--which are as dismal as the rest of the movie. How do you decide what to leave out when there's nothing worth keeping in?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    In a confused world, this is a movie with answers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The problem is that Allen is getting a bit long in the tooth to be playing a romancer-rescuer, and since he and Helen Hunt have a rather frigid actorly rapport, we have plenty of time to notice the awkward, and barely acknowledged, disparity in their ages.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 10 Peter Rainer
    Is it possible none of these actors read the script before they signed on? Were New Line executives perhaps too hung up on hobbits to notice how whacked out this movie is?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    An arty sleepwalk. Thornton has developed a style of acting that goes beyond minimal into the near nonexistent.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Sometimes a movie thinks it's one thing (charming) when it's really something else (creepy). Such is the case with writer-director Stephen Belber's Management.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It’s easy to call this film a video action game starring real people, but that “real” part means a lot.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Stay home.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The cast is something of an indie movie hall of fame that includes Giovanni Ribisi, Mary Steenburgen, Brittany Murphy, and Toni Collette. Marcia Gay Harden is particularly fine as the murdered girl's mother.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    The latest, and, one fears, not the last episode in the kiss-kiss-bang-bang saga of L.A. police Detectives Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover) and Martin Riggs (Mel Gibson) is even more of a comic strip than its immediate predecessor. [15 May 1992]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    At one point, Val bemoans how stupid the country is, how dumbed-down everything has become. Allen's new movie is far from dumb, but it has an air of abdication about it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    As Lucas’s girlfriend April, Isild Le Besco brings a sprig of sunshine into the film’s fetid hollows.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In Sidney Lumet's "Dog Day Afternoon," which only looks better with the years, New York was as much a character in that film as its people. It was a movie that took its cue from the energy of the city. The Inside Man takes its cue mostly from other movies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Viewers expecting a blistering attack on the fast-food business, or an Altmanesque panorama, will be disappointed, but it's a sensitive and humane piece of work.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It radiates intelligence. Of how many historical epics can that be said these days?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Cloying as much of this stuff is, it's not cynical. Curtis seems genuinely convinced that love is all around. Far be it from me to say otherwise. We don’t speak the same language.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It has a sweetness all its own.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What makes Nolte so much stronger than the other performers is precisely this sense of mysteriousness and indirection, which doesn't really correspond to the Adam Verver of the novel but certainly jibes with James's overall method.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Draggy pastiche of tired gags and half-baked homilies.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    At times, Bullock seems as confused by the plot as we are. Even if you cut the writer Bill Kelly and the director Mennan Yapo a lot of slack, there are plot holes galore. May I suggest that it's time to declare a moratorium on movies about time?
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    Wherever you were schooled, in public schools or private, in the slums or in the suburbs, you will recognize yourself in this film and laugh and beam and cower.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    It’s tough to be Tracy and Hepburn, let alone Doris Day and Rock Hudson, when you're trying to get your mouth around lines that wouldn't pass muster on a UPN sitcom.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    It's as if an obsessed movie nut had decided to collect every bad war-movie convention on one computer and program it to spit out a script.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    A mesmerizing documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    An astounding, one-of-a-kind movie.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    But the erotic potential of animation has never been realized and Cool World doesn't even try. [11 Jul 1992]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    If you have a hankering for a pretty good Woody Allen movie and want to brush up on your French at the same time, Shall We Kiss? is the ticket.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    There's ample reason to stay with this series. When Harry says "I love magic," you believe it.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    There's enough family dysfunction here to fill out a dozen soppy soap operas.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Too many different stories are vying for attention here, and none of them are very good.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Renner gives a full-bore performance of great individuality and industriousness, but essentially his character is as glamorized as any classic Westerner.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Lee has phenomenal presence, and his movements are so balletically powerful that his rampages seem like waking nightmares. Lee keeps you watching The Crow when you'd rather look away.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Russell is unusual among first-time directors in his ability to mold and shape performance. [28 Jul 1994 Pg. F2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Smashing for much of the way; as a piece of fantasy moviemaking, franchise-style, it beats the bejesus out of "Harry Potter."
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    As thin and jokey as this movie often is, I prefer it to the serioso treatment that usually encrusts this type of material. At its best, The Savages captures the lunacy that comes with coping with sorrow.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Keys takes a scattershot approach to Cuban music, filming not only specific artists, like Los Cohibas and Los Zafiros, but also street musicians in the barrio and just about everywhere else he can find them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    Zemeckis tries to juice things up by staging numerous chase scenes up and around London, but do we really need "A Christmas Carol: The Action Picture"?
    • 33 Metascore
    • 10 Peter Rainer
    The film is filled with actors you want to see -- just not in this thing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    There's a timelessness, an immanence to what she (Varda) shows us.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Spacious, headlong entertainment.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    The Bucket List is a movie for oldsters that, paradoxically, looks as if it was made for 15-year-olds. If this is what is meant in Hollywood as "thinking outside the box," then it's time to get a new box.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    21
    The more moralistic 21 gets, the less enjoyable it is.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    In The Game, Fincher pulls back from the total gross-out but sustains a tone of aggravated anxiety. Hitchcock could have done this material and still made its perversities pleasurable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    Spacey is turning into another Robin Williams: Between this film and "Pay It Forward" he cops the prize for the Sappiest Performances by an Actor Previously Known to Have Great Talent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I'm not sure I have it in me to rant yet again about what a deprivation it is for our finest actor to deny us his genius in this way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    As an actress, Madonna has to work on her vulnerability more.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Because almost all animated films now are computer generated, the 2-D animated Curious George has the not-unpleasant patina of an antique.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    The Pinochet Case is a searing album of remembrance from those who, having survived, suffered most.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Despite all the computer-generated effects and highflying superhero theatrics, this roughly $120 million movie is, with few exceptions, remarkable only in its small human touches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Based on the 1938 novel by Winifred Watson, it's a deluxe romance that most of the time plays like farce.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The bloom is decidedly off the pinkish rose. Martin has a few inspired moments but in order to get to them you have to wade through a mosh pit of unfunny gags.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    The best thing The Edge of Love could do for you is to send you back to Thomas's poetry. Dash this folderol.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    I don't mean to unduly target Kill Bill Vol. 2 --it's certainly no worse than most of the blam-blam fare out there. But what I crave now are movies that speak to me in a different way about violence, that acknowledge the fact that real people are harmed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As it is, The Maid is a study of a character who rarely emerges from the opaque end of the spectrum.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fitfully effective as a battle movie, and Mel Gibson does his rugged best to take center stage without seeming to. But the movie is self-righteous in a way that's frequently unseemly.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Most Mafia movies are unduly sympathetic, but this one takes the cake. Peter Dinklage is excellent as the mob's chief lawyer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    In some ways the movie's straightforward style is more appropriate to the horror than a more souped-up approach would have been. With material this strong, sometimes the best thing a filmmaker can do is to stay out of the way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Goony, so-so comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The movie is a decidedly mixed bag, in part, because of the equally pronounced disparities between Burton and Carroll – and between Burton and Disney, for that matter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s a dirgelike odyssey sparked by Julianne Moore’s overheated turn as George’s best friend – a welcome respite from Firth’s clenched emoting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    It would have better if Brooks had invested more time trying to discover what makes AMERICANS laugh.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Frances McDormand deserves much better than Lisa Cholodenko’s flat-footed Laurel Canyon...McDormand alone makes the picture worth seeing: Her character is a rash combo of steel and dissolution and regret.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    This is Eastwood's first acting job since "Million Dollar Baby," and his range, like his raspiness, is fairly one-note.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Spiritual redemption is a big theme of Narnia, but on a purely entertainment level, the movie also goes a long way in redeeming the current sad state of children's fantasy filmmaking.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    Sandler being Chaplinesque isn't pretty; he's just doing his smart-aleck slacker shtick with a moister eye.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    What United 93 demonstrates, as if we needed proof, is that it is too soon - it may always be too soon - to sort out the feelings from that day.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Whitaker is terrifying in a way that we recognize not from old movies but from life.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A pleasantly disposable romantic comedy starring the once and future indie-queen Parker Posey.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    The plot's many complications pretty much all add up, which is a rarity these days for a murder mystery. It's possible that audiences don't even care anymore if a film makes sense as long it's entertaining.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    Beautifully directed by Phillip Noyce, the film -- is a full experience, a love story and a murder mystery that expands into a meditation on the deep deceptions of innocence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Undeniably powerful, but also rather numbing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    Delivers more goose bumps than anything Hollywood has served up in years – which I hope does not mean that Bayona, a first-time feature director and music video whiz, will be enlisted to direct "Saw V."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    A stinker.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Face/Off wouldn't work without two great actors, and it doesn't always work with them. But their gifts justify the whole loony enterprise.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    The first full-scale documentary about the history of those years, and it lays out lucidly the involvement of the Communist Party in the young men's defense and the ways in which the trials, against the backdrop of the Depression, replayed the murderous quarrels of the Civil War all over again.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Divided We Fall is intended to be restorative, but its wish fulfillments, while charming, are also a bit too gaga for that.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The movie's gross-out effects are impressive but wearying. How apt that the director's name is Gore.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The black comedy Noise may be a one-joke movie but it's a resonant one.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    The Saint exists almost entirely as a vehicle for Kilmer's quick-change smarty-pants swagger, and it's inconceivable without him. He's great fun to watch--a squirish master thief with a wide streak of lewdness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Not only Duvall shines. Murray, in case anybody still doubted it, is one of the finest character actors in America.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    A solid achievement, but those in the press who have been trumpeting its greatness may be going in for a bit of self-congratulation. The movie plays very well to the choir.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best, and perhaps the only, reason to see Duncan Tucker's Transamerica is for Felicity Huffman's touching, shape-shifting performance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    An overly stately affair that often substitutes production values for imagination.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Rainer
    For all its triteness, Sheridan's sentimentality has its poignancy: This adolescent boy is all set up to live out a halcyon life he'll never have.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Depp and Rush are still in there plugging away. They’re troupers, but the series is all used up. If there is to be another sequel it will have to be called "Pirates of the Caribbean – At Wit's End."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    The best thing you can say about Mad Money is that it has a good cast. The worst thing you can say about it is that the cast is extremely ill-used.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    At times, Pride and Glory seems to be about a war between actors, not cops. Nobody comes off well.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    Rarely has there been so obscenely precise a depiction of ravaged innocence. This young girl has nothing to live for--and an entire life ahead of her in which to live it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Jenkins has an admirable feeling for, as the French would say, mise en scène, and a gift for placing actors in naturalistic settings. What he lacks at this point is a strong story sense.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    An inchoate mass of half-baked (and sometimes blackened) Oedipal dramaturgy. Coppola has made some of the greatest films ever made in traditional narrative mode, but whenever he goes into his indie-outsider dance, he stumbles badly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Streep and Tomlin are so attuned to each other that it's as if they had worked together all of their lives. In fact, it's their first time. Streep has become a wonderfully soulful comedian; Tomlin always was one.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    By the end of the film, everybody has been triple- and quadruple- and even quintuple-crossed, but the characters still standing all seem to be very pleased with themselves for a job well done. If only we could figure out what the job was exactly.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    This series is in its fortieth year; it might be nice to see Bond battle a readily identifiable, real-world villain for a change. There's certainly no shortage.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    As in many a French movie, especially crime movie, the philosophe and the crook turn out to be each other’s mirror image.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Up
    As a piece of poetic compression, it ranks with the opening of Orson Welles's "The Magnificent Ambersons."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    The marvel of Cage's performance is that, somehow, it's all of a piece. That's the marvel of the movie, too. This is one fever dream you'll remember whole.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Thanks to Tukur, what we get here is still something: a stunning portrait of a good man caught in a widening inferno.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    What makes the film intriguing, and somewhat off-putting, is that Romain is deliberately portrayed as a heel; he strains his relations with his lover and his family, except for his grandmother (Moreau), to the breaking point.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    This may be the first crime thriller to explicitly utilize superstring theory but, in its woozy romanticism, it's not that far removed from this year's other time-warp movie, "The Lake House," about two lovers living in parallel years - or "Frequency," which starred Jim Caviezel as a good guy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Director Danny Boyle and screenwriter John Hodge (who is a physician!) keep the action spurting forward, but their approach is oblique. We seem to be catching the odds and ends of scenes; it's as if the filmmakers wanted to make a movie in which all the expected high points were skimped.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It's awfully difficult at this point in film history to come up with a car chase that's startlingly new, but Gray pulls it off. It's the best of its kind since "The French Connection."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    A crime thriller that is strong on sultry atmosphere--you practically break into a sweat watching it--but weak on believability.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    It’s both lowdown and effete, a jamboree of whoopee jokes and sick wit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    Plenty of terrible movies know how to work your tear ducts. Here's a weepie that, in Pfeiffer's performance, touches you on the highest levels.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The film's biggest unexplored question: Why is someone with a reputation for laying bare the truth so addicted to plastic surgery?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    A hushed and powerful piece.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    No better than the first – which means it will probably be creamed by critics and make a jillion dollars. But really, standards are standards.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It makes the same misstep that Allen's comedies often do: It assumes that the lives of these people are only about sex and love, and so that's all we ever see of them. This one-and-a-half-dimensionality wears thin.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Rapp has clearly been influenced by such lyrically disaffected '70s movies as "Five Easy Pieces." He brings out in Deschanel a sense of yearning, an avidity, that hits home.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The back-and-forth between the performers is tensely choreographed, and Buscemi does a good job opening up the action, which mostly takes place in a Manhattan loft.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Peter Rainer
    He (Gibson) ramrods his way through the bugged-out hysterics as if he were appearing in a movie that actually made sense. What a brave heart.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    Waltz With Bashir is a supremely courageous act, not only as a piece of filmmaking, but much more so as a moral testament.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It melodramatizes everything and yet its overall effect is something more than melodrama.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    All in all, a visual and musical feast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This movie might have been better if it hadn't fashioned itself as a cross between "Citizen Kane" and "Chinatown," and instead had used Reeves's story to dramatize the transitional state of 1950s Hollywood.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Messrs. Iñárritu and Arriaga have played this card one too many times. If they really want to appear radical the next time out, my advice is: Tell a single story and tell it well. What a concept.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a powerful subject, but director McG and screenwriter Jamie Linden haul out every cliché in the playbook.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Nobody can play stupid better than Daniels – think "Dumb and Dumber" – and, as it turns out, few can play smarter. He's a sharp asset in a sharp movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    A richly appointed period piece, it features kingly tantrums, mistresses, bodices, roaring fireplaces, incest, and mutton. It also features sharply enunciated, period-perfect dialogue in which nary a contraction can be heard.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    I wish Fontaine would follow up with a sequel: "Coco After Chanel." Tautou's performance cries out for a second act.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    A prime example of a dysfunctional-family comedy that also doubles as a road movie. Even the vehicle of transport is dysfunctional.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 42 Peter Rainer
    The result is this metabiography that says almost nothing about the great photographer's life or art.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It would take a filmmaker of truly astonishing versatility to harmonize all these disparate tones...But there are moments in Dreamcatcher when Kasdan gives you the giggles and the creeps at the same time, and that’s not easy to do.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Like many a Hollywood political drama, Lions for Lambs carries a full head of steam that is indistinguishable from a lot of hot air.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    As hig concepts go, You Don't Mess With the Zohan" takes the cake.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    A fine example of what a filmmaker can achieve when she takes on a great subject and lets it play out with all the respect and attention it deserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The actors, all of whom seem too posed and pretty, are not particularly accomplished, and director Luis Mandoki lacks the visual imagination to bring the story to a boil.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Hartnett has been stuck in the young-adult heartthrob mode for some time now, but this comic thriller may launch him into meatier fare.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    This monstro-budgeted sequel to The Matrix has more than twice as many special effects as the original... there is also more than twice as much philosophic bull as before--and there was plenty of that the first time around.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    August Evening is rambling, diffuse, and at times so "sensitive" it makes your teeth hurt. And yet it's also intermittently quite affecting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Peter Rainer
    The work of an obsessive who has developed a light touch--though some of his more outright themes and pronouncements can be heavy-going.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    This is a movie about, among other things, pain, and it's made by someone who understands its expression.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    There's a new sensibility at work here, wry yet lushly disaffected, and it will be worth watching what Martel does next.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    Its wasted cast includes Dyan Cannon, Sally Kellerman, Len Cariou, and Brenda Vaccaro, who miraculously manages to give a fine performance in this malarkey.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Joe Eszterhas's screenplay is vastly more thoughtful than his scripts for "Basic Instinct" and its ilk, but the storytelling is too spotty for the movie to become the effective moral tale it might have been.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    At its best, the movie makes you feel like a kindred spirit.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    The most joyously cinematic movie I've seen this year. Chomet's astonishing imagination conjures images you could swear you've seen in your dreams.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Like all too many docs these days, it chronicles a contest while caricaturing the contestants.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Rainer
    Jackson is rare among the makers of epic movies in that he knows how to do the small stuff, too. The Return of the King has “heart”--how else could it pump out all that blood?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As Leonard, Nivola isn’t bad, which is good, since the entire movie revolves around him.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    All this is mighty silly, but there's something to be said for watching a French movie that, for a change, isn't about l'amour, existential angst, or madness. It's oddly reassuring to know that Hollywood isn't the only place where dithery, disposable spy spoofs are manufactured.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 33 Peter Rainer
    Poetic conceits only work if they're poetic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Peter Rainer
    Caine is burlesquing his own iconography and enjoying every minute of it. He hasn't lost his dignity, though; it takes a lot of self-possession to act this blissfully silly. He even looks good with bad teeth.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Because we know almost from the get-go that things will turn out bad-to-bittersweet for them, the movie is like one long autopsy of what went wrong, starting with Day No. 488.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    There is in The Mother a rich understanding of where old age takes you. Along with the myth that seniors don't have sex drives, the film dispels a larger one: that the years bring wisdom.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    The only thing missing from Salt is Lotte Lenya's Rosa Klebb with her steel blade-tipped shoes from "From Russia With Love." Come to think of it, the Russian defector here does indeed kill with steel-blade shoes. Nice touch.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    I have always felt that Almodóvar was at his best as an artist when he was at his most playful. Volver is about deadly serious matters of the heart, but it often has a screwball spirit. The darker things are, the funnier.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Biting as it tries to be, Tropic Thunder is mostly toothless. Its targets – Hollywood vanity, Hollywood tantrums – are easy hits.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At worst is inoffensive. But that's the point. When you're making a movie about people whose lives are torn up in this way, inoffensiveness is, well, offensive.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 16 Peter Rainer
    An impossibly, incomprehensibly overlong and cacophonous bore.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    So many movies these days are being linked, often quite tenuously, to current politics. Let this new film be no exception. I am happy to say that Ice Age: The Meltdown points up for toddlers the dangers of global warming.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    This is not just a musicologist's dream; it's our dream, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Rainer
    Hallström conveys a bit of the circuslike atmosphere of the times. But he overreaches in trying to turn the film into a commentary on the politically corrupt 1970s.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Rainer
    The film starts out as a freewheeling farce and turns into a pitch-black burlesque with surprising depths of feeling.

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