For 2,018 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Fateless
Lowest review score: 0 Enough
Score distribution:
2,018 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Rust and Bone is made by filmmakers and actors who are capable of much more – and they know it. The result is a true oddity: an orgy of hokum dressed up as an art film.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Because of its subject matter, and because of the actors, it's impossible to watch this film without being moved. But a martinet is running the show.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Zilberman's conceit is that these players, who mesh so beautifully in their music-making, are discordant in their personal lives. Those lives are constructed for maximum messiness, turning what might have been resonant drama into high-class soap opera.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Promised Land is more effective as an anti-fracking screed than as a drama. Damon has his low-key charisma and Van Sant captures the enraged anomie of the community, but, except for one big plot twist, everything in this film is telegraphed from the first frame.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Fred Schepisi, one of the world's great directors ("The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith," "A Cry in the Dark") is working at half-speed in The Eye of the Storm, a convoluted family drama derived from a Patrick White novel.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Cruise is better than he’s been in a while because he damps down his usual all-intensity-all-the-time MO. He’s best here when his character seems the most scared. And Emily Blunt as a commando legend is indomitable, a credit to her exoskeleton.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    For all its pretensions and intermittent power, is essentially high-grade claptrap.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    So free-floating that it floats away.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It pales beside the best down-and-dirty political movies (ranging from "The Candidate" to "The Manchurian Candidate") because, finally, it lacks the courage of its own lowdown convictions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Ungainly and overly ambitious, The Butler tries to encompass too much history within too narrow a framework.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Boyle loads his movie with so many snazzy effects that we lose sight of what it all means – if anything. His showoffiness confuses.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Equal parts preachy and melodramatic, The Company You Keep never quite figures out what it wants to be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This is a movie that cries out for more than the too-cool-for-school Coppola’s trademark hipster anomie. She may be too much a part of the celebrity-mongering world she portrays to do justice to its injustices.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Moderately entertaining, periodically draggy, Transcendence is not as wacky-visionary as “The Matrix,” or nearly as lyrical as “Her.”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film itself vaporizes before your eyes, but it’s likable. Given its unstable mishmash of thuggery and whimsy, that’s something of an achievement.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Here’s a valuable moviegoing rule: Just because you use up an entire handful of hankies doesn’t mean a movie’s great. But Stamp and Redgrave are the real deal.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Thematically at least, it’s like a John Ford movie with pickup trucks. But everything plays out with a sodden deliberateness, as if something mythic were going on. No such luck.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    One of those documentaries that is more testimonial than investigation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The subject matter, already troubling, is made even more so by Vinterberg’s almost sadomasochistic penchant for propping up Lucas’s martyrdom. He’s gunning for prey, too.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In more ways than one, MacFarlane is trying to outgross Mel Brooks.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Not much depth or political examination here. The film works best as a survivalist’s manual.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    We see him (Brolin) whip up a first-class chili, but his specialty is peach pie, which we watch him prepare so lovingly that I was surprised Reitman didn’t include the recipe in the end credits.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There’s a pretty good movie buried somewhere deep inside the ungainly pastry that is Chef.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s a truism, reinforced here, that actors often are the last to comprehend how they do what they do. No matter. What they give us is all that counts.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It’s respectable, safe, intelligent – and a bit dull.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This movie is altogether too nice. I prefer sports movies with more sass and snap, like the films Ron Shelton (“Bull Durham”) used to make, or even parts of “Moneyball.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I wish the film had probed more deeply into why anybody would face those odds. George Mallory’s “Because it’s there” has never quite cut it for me.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Firth is very good at playing racked men of high principle. He’s so well cast as Lomax that, at times, he’s almost too perfect in the role. He’s still the best thing about the movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Movies about doubles are, almost by definition, creepy, but Villeneuve, not to be outdone, piles on the weirdness. He’s big on spider imagery, but the web is flimsy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Radcliffe and Kazan have a nice nerds-in-clover rapport. If only the movie wasn’t so satisfied with how cute it is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Despite the film’s intentions, Idris and Seun can’t really stand in for anybody but themselves. What they go through, as middle-class kids in a privileged school system, seems far less race-based than the filmmakers would have us believe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Although the movie goes way back into Rumsfeld’s career, it is the Iraq section that is the most noteworthy – and disappointing. Morris elicits virtually nothing revelatory from Rumsfeld.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I’ve never seen a better performance – or whatever you want to call it – from a two-year-old.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Gleeson is a wonderful actor and he keeps a lid on the blarney. He manages to convey a lot – fear, anger, compassion, rue – with only the slightest of squints and frowns. But he’s still the center of a cooked-up cavalcade of souls.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    I wish the movie weren’t quite so sappy about the spiritually redemptive powers of fine cuisine. Sometimes a meal is just a meal.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Some of the human-interest stories are compelling, but too much of this film is as dry as a high school classroom presentation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Rainer
    Henry Fool finds Hartley assimilating Godard's ideas with far more assurance than in previous pictures like "Amateur" and "Flirt."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A lovely minor achievement. It would have been major if Breillat had been more expansive with respect to Anaïs instead of contentedly letting her go on about her lumpish ways.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Has an appealing rawness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a sinuous, bittersweet odyssey, and although the filmmaking lacks finesse, the actors, especially Mandvi, with his bright, sorrowful beauty, and the great Om Puri, who plays Ganesh's father-in-law with an infernal crankiness, are always worth watching.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A great deal of energy is expended on metaphysical ruminations that become ever fuzzier. The film is intended as an allegory, but it works best as a jailbreak romance. In this movie, lowbrow trumps highbrow every time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    CQ
    Not everything in this ambitious comic escapade works, but Coppola, along with his sister, Sofia, is a real filmmaker. It must be in the genes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's an opulent, if instantly disposable, kinetic joyride.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    This may sound like an Oprah episode, but the outcome is far from predictable and carries the force of a tragedy in which everyone, and no one, is to blame.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It’s powerful, all right, and Downey’s performance is lacerating, but missing is any sense of lyricism in Dark’s hallucinatory yearnings. Without that leap of transcendence, this new Singing Detective doesn’t sing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I don’t mind the movie’s retro-ness, but I wish Mostow didn't take pulp so seriously.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What saves it is Dennis Quaid.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Were it not for these performances (Blanchett, Ribisi, Swank, Reeves), The Gift would be fairly negligible.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    You can believe this man (Jones) left his family because he felt born into the wrong tribe. Now if only he had picked the right movie . . .
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It might seem as though there is nothing new to be done with the crime thriller, but The Code (La Mentale), directed by Manuel Boursinhac and written by Bibi Naceri, provides a new twist.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    There's something a bit condescending about how the movie devolves into a falling-out-between-friends scenario, as if the only way our attention could be held by this subculture were if it was presented to us sentimentally.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Inspires the requisite shock and awe, but a little goes a long way. About the fifth time I saw someone slip-sliding away from a 60-foot wave, I longed to hear someone on the soundtrack say, “That guy is really nuts.”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Though worth seeing, should be better than it is.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Some directors can profit from the strictures of a strong narrative, but, for Linklater, the conventionality of The Newton Boys works against the glide of his free-floating style.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Franklin directs smoothly, but except for Freeman, the theatrics are pretty pro forma.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's plotless. It fits no category -- "docudrama tone poem" probably comes closest.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The best new addition to the corp is Alan Cumming’s Nightcrawler.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Billy Ray is so eager to be fair-minded about everything and everyone that you can't help thinking he's a patsy, too. If he directed a movie of Othello, he'd probably try to make us feel warm and fuzzy about poor, misunderstood Iago.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The audience for Hannibal is far more primed for a good time; if the film is a hit, it will be because Lecter has been cartoonized; his ghoulish panache, his double entendres about cannibalism, and his pet phrases like "goody-goody" and "okeydokey" all serve to make him a figure of fun.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    At one point, Val bemoans how stupid the country is, how dumbed-down everything has become. Allen's new movie is far from dumb, but it has an air of abdication about it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Watching it is like getting a peek behind the curtain. But it's frustrating, too, because the casting of Emadeddin as a murderer-in-the-making precludes any psychological depth. And as an indictment of social inequality, which is the film's calling card, Panahi inadvertantly makes a far better case for the haves than for the have-nots.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Spartan is a character study embedded in an action-hero scenario. Neither aspect ever really breaks loose.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's all been done before, and better.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Leconte films in an austere yet invigorated style; the action never settles into stiff tableaux.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Neil Young’s concept album turned concert tour turned movie, which is like nothing I’ve ever seen--at least not in an unaltered state.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Secretary is deeply conventional: Edward and Lee accept their bondage as the way to a more fulfilling life. It's the filmmakers who need to be spanked.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I'm not sure I have it in me to rant yet again about what a deprivation it is for our finest actor to deny us his genius in this way.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A bit too satisfied with its own sweet sensitivities.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The problem is that Allen is getting a bit long in the tooth to be playing a romancer-rescuer, and since he and Helen Hunt have a rather frigid actorly rapport, we have plenty of time to notice the awkward, and barely acknowledged, disparity in their ages.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Should be remembered for a pair of performers -- Derek Luke and Viola Davis, whose cameo as the mother who abandoned him cuts through the sap like an acetylene torch.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    LaBute is attacking our society’s obsession with the surface of things, whether it be a painter’s canvas or a human one, but his drama is, in itself, relentlessly superficial.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Devos is especially fine as a woman whose inner solitude carries depth charges.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fortunately, most of the malarkey in this movie seems intentional in the same Sunday-afternoon-serial way as the Indiana Jones movies (some of which Johnston worked on).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What makes Nolte so much stronger than the other performers is precisely this sense of mysteriousness and indirection, which doesn't really correspond to the Adam Verver of the novel but certainly jibes with James's overall method.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The effect is a bit like watching "Gone With the Wind" with a dumpling substituting for Scarlett O’Hara.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Andrew Niccol throws around a lot of intriguing ideas in this film, and even though his ambitions are more expansive than his talent, he's managed to come up with something that credibly resembles the shape of things to come, Hollywood-style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fry's saving grace is his love of actors. The younger and less familiar performers are more than adequate, but it's the older guard that shines. Broadbent is marvelously rummy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Despite its exuberant perversities, Waters’s take on erotomania is almost quaint.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It’s the difference between artistry and knowingness. About Schmidt doesn’t bring us deeply into the lives of its people because it’s too busy trying to feel superior to them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fitfully effective as a battle movie, and Mel Gibson does his rugged best to take center stage without seeming to. But the movie is self-righteous in a way that's frequently unseemly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    He doesn’t entirely succeed, but the attempt has poignancy: As uneven as much of his recent work has been, Bertolucci's still in love with the movies, and his ardor--if not always the ends he puts it to--is exhilarating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    There is in The Mother a rich understanding of where old age takes you. Along with the myth that seniors don't have sex drives, the film dispels a larger one: that the years bring wisdom.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Even in a piffle like Something’s Gotta Give, Keaton reminds us of her uncanny ability to inhabit her characters' knockabout emotions.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Talk to Her affects some people very deeply, while others, like me, find it high-grade kitsch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fortunately, there are more than enough moments when the heavy-handedness gives way to the sheer bliss of ordinary magic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a marvelous, resonant joke that never quite succeeds: Stretches of the film resemble a Dario Argento horrorfest crossed with a Mel Brooks spoof. But the director, E. Elias Merhige, and his screenwriter, Steven Katz, occasionally bring some rapture to the creepiness, and Dafoe's vampire, with his graceful, ritualistic death lunges, is a sinewy, skull-and-crossbones horror who seems to come less out of the German Expressionist tradition than from Kabuki.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Suggests a cross between "Sunset Boulevard" and "All About Eve." The suggestion, alas, doesn't go very far, but Bening's performance approaches the pantheon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's one of the weirdest achievements in film history: Temperamentally, Spielberg and Kubrick are such polar opposites that A.I. has the moment-to-moment effect of being completely at odds with itself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The Last Samurai is an idyll in which the savageries of existence are transcended by spiritual devotion. That’s a beautiful dream, and it gives the film a deep pleasingness, but the fullness of life and its blackest ambiguities are sacrificed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Shyamalan wants to be the metaphysical poet of movies, but he's dangerously close to becoming its O. Henry. The best surprise ending he could give us in his next movie would be no surprise ending at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Anderson is something of a prodigy himself, and he's riddled with talent, but he hasn't figured out how to be askew and heartfelt at the same time. When he does, he'll probably make the movie The Royal Tenenbaums was meant to be, and it'll be a sight to see.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Pretty much the whole movie is a series of poses, static and uninvolving, except for cinematographer Eduardo Serra’s lighting, which makes everything look convincingly Vermeer-ish. I’d like to see what he could do with Rembrandt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A sentimental, feel-good look at a family in mourning, but Jake Gyllenhaal rises above the clichéd script with a brilliantly creative performance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I wanted to be transported by this movie; I wasn't quite. But I respect it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The filmmakers betray the essentially childlike appeal of Shrek by piling up all these too-hip Hollywood references aimed at adults. It's not just kids who will feel cheated.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    This time around, Harry Potter has more to worry about than the Dark Arts -- though parts of The Chamber of Secrets are spellbinding, he seems to be suffering from a bit of sequelitis.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Taking Sides has a padded-out, stagebound quality that is anything but lyrical. And Szabó, a Hungarian best known for "Mephisto" and "Colonel Redl," is not at his best here.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    If the filmmakers had made a point of satirizing the new makeover culture in ways that went beyond camp jibes at décor and suburbia, they might have come up with a classic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I realize that Fosse's dark sizzle might seem a bit dated today, but surely something halfway snazzy could have been devised for this movie. It's toothless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Demme’s Manchurian Candidate is far from a disgrace, but it's not freewheeling enough, not strange enough to make sense of our gathering dread.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Despite all the computer-generated effects and highflying superhero theatrics, this roughly $120 million movie is, with few exceptions, remarkable only in its small human touches.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Except for a few brilliant flashes, mostly from Peter O'Toole as Hector’s father, the Trojans' magisterially woebegone King Priam, Troy is a fairly routine action picture with an advanced case of grandeuritis.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    In U-Turn Stone is reaching for the pulp without the politics. He's trying for noir as ritual dance. But Stone is too frenzied a filmmaker to keep the dance steps simple.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Even though The Devil's Own reportedly cost close to $100 million, it comes across as a sleek, medium-grade character study occasionally punctuated by gunfire. If this is what $100 million buys these days, can $200-million movies be very far off?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The entire remake has been dumb-dumbed by John Hughes, who wrote the script and produced.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a movie about the warm feeling you get when you belong to a family, and, throughout, the thermostat is turned up high.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Directed by Alan Rudolph and co-scripted by him with Randy Sue Coburn, Mrs. Parker is a real odd duck of a movie. It seems to have been made both as tribute and put-down. The sporty conviviality of the Algonquin Round Table is celebrated, and yet there's a hollowness to the confabs.[21 Dec 1994, p.4]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    If you're young enough to have missed some of the better Lemmon-Matthau pairings, like "The Fortune Cookie" or "The Odd Couple," then Grumpy Old Men won't seem so grumpy. [25 Dec 1993, p.2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    French Kiss tries to be a glass of pink champagne, but some of the fizz has gone out of the bottle. But director Lawrence Kasdan and screenwriter Adam Brooks cram so many potshots into the piece that, after a while, it makes you laugh anyway.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Sam Rockwell plays Barris with a hipster’s shimmy that’s creepily effective -- The problem with making a movie about a hollow man is that, when things start to get heavy, you’re stuck with nothingness at the core.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What's weird about subUrbia is that Linklater's zoned-out technique is wedded to Bogosian's in-your-face power-rant oratory. The result is like local anesthesia--you can see the incisions, but you can't feel them.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Nothing that Davies does is ordinary or artless but his craftsmanship has its suffocating side too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Lee has phenomenal presence, and his movements are so balletically powerful that his rampages seem like waking nightmares. Lee keeps you watching The Crow when you'd rather look away.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There’s something off-putting about this film’s optimism: After all, how many people can afford to do what Crowley did?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s an M. Night Shyamalan movie with a PhD. Or maybe an MA.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Amy Adams is such a likable actress that she makes the romantic comedy Leap Year worth watching even though we’ve seen it all before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Blunt and Friend strike a few flinty sparks, and Julian Fellowes’s script has its share of dry-as-dust witticisms. Most of the time, though, it’s a stiff pageant.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The derby sequences are just OK, and the conflict between Bliss and her uncomprehending parents, played by Marcia Gay Harden and (a fine) Daniel Stern, is so predictable that you wish someone had rolled onto the set to whip it into shape.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    By bringing the story into Iraq, Grant Heslov courts tastelessness. Gooniness and Gitmo don't mix.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If you are not already familiar with Williams’s best plays and film adaptations, this musty magnolia of a movie won’t encourage you to seek them out.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's difficult to imagine the target audience for this film. Gangbangers, perhaps?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This documentary about the evangelical belief in biblical prophecy is both overly ambitious and skimpy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's asking too much for a great actor to be matched up with a great director on a project like this. On the other hand, there's always the sequel.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Departures is sappy and wacky – not the best combination.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Rudd is amusing enough; Segel, who towers over Rudd, is amusing, too, though the role seems to have been written for Owen Wilson. Maybe Wilson was busy. Lucky him.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    For all the glam and swank, the film is essentially a bright, shiny, empty puzzle. The puzzlemaking by writer-director Tony Gilroy is clever but most frequently an end in itself.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The presentation has verve. But the story is confusingly told - everything is NOT illuminated - and, as the seeker, Elijah Wood is a big blank.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Che
    Although Steven Soderbergh's two-part Che may have an epic running time of almost 4-1/2 hours, its scope is surprisingly narrow.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Beautiful geishas flit and whoosh through the equally beautiful scenery. Their kimonos are artworks-in-motion. So why is the film so boring? It could be because director Rob Marshall is so transfixed by all the ritualistic hoo-ha that he never brings the story down to earth.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Most of it plays out as sub-medium-grade farce, but Carrey has some funny calisthenic bits where he appears to have the pliability of a rubber toy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a moderately enjoyable escapade that isn't quite clever enough for adults and not quite imaginative enough for children.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Although Casanova is far from a stinker, I can't join in the chorus of praise for what is essentially a coy farce replete with arch performances and even archer dialogue.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Haskins comes across as too pure. When he plays only his black athletes in the championship finals, his monomania is presented as a good thing. After all, he won, didn't he?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Mostly a snooze. Maybe if Buscemi himself had starred in it things would have turned out better.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Da Vinci Code is so transparently pitched as pulp entertainment that, in the end, it's about as subversive as "Starsky and Hutch."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Shriner's direction has an Afterschool Special blandness, but those mechanical owls are quite realistic. While the film was in production Hiaasen said that he had "nightmare visions of the gopher in 'Caddyshack.' " He needn't have worried.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Most of the time, however, we are watching pathology without benefit of insight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This movie might have been better if it hadn't fashioned itself as a cross between "Citizen Kane" and "Chinatown," and instead had used Reeves's story to dramatize the transitional state of 1950s Hollywood.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a rather lifeless re-telling of the Nativity, with greeting-card imagery and stiff performances.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    By the end, 10 Items Or Less has the obnoxiousness of a vanity project. Freeman is having a better time than we are.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Good German is a prime example of a movie made by highly skilled and intelligent filmmakers that nevertheless seems misguided from the get-go.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Playing a cantankerous, beer-swigging human wreck of a man for the umpteenth time, Nolte is very good but very familiar.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a powerful subject, but director McG and screenwriter Jamie Linden haul out every cliché in the playbook.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If writer-director Marc Lawrence had stuck with Alex's faded glory, Music and Lyrics could have been terrific. It could have been about something. Instead, he's confected a curdled valentine.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The law of diminishing returns is no more apparent than in the movie world. A sequel, with rare exceptions, is worse than the film it follows, and sequels of sequels fare even worse. Such is the case with Shrek the Third.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Draggy Italian epic that's big on production values but skimpy on inspiration.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One dramatic ploy that doesn't work is the casting of Demi Moore as Tracy Edward, a homicide detective intent on capturing the Thumbprint Killer. Moore gave a rare good performance as the washed up diva in "Bobby," but her stridency here is grating.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Patrice Leconte has directed excellent serious films such as "Monsieur Hire" and "Man on the Train," but when it comes to humor he loses his bearings. His latest attempt at seriocomedy, My Best Friend, is a premise in search of a film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Whatever brought Greene down was far more complex than this film allows for.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The romantic comedy 27 Dresses will work best for people who have never seen a romantic comedy. If you have, you might find it amusing to tally up the steals – I mean, homages.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a showpiece for that Belgian city's medieval splendor. You may want to book vacation reservations upon leaving the theater, although the memory of this underwhelming movie may tarnish the sightseeing.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I'll say this much for Jumper – it's got a great premise. Or at least the beginnings of a premise.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This latest whiffle ball from Team Apatow is a mildly amusing comedy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Simon Pegg, of "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz," is onscreen almost constantly in Run Fatboy Run, and his mugging and smirking and preening wear out their welcome fast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Chen Shi-Zheng, well regarded as an opera and theater director, makes his feature film debut.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    McCarthy is so careful not to take a political stand that his film seems neutered by good intentions. In the spirit of squishy humanism, he soft-pedals a hard-hitting topic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Ultimately, forgettable, but for most of the way it's a pleasant little vacation of a movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Do we really need another Hulk movie? I was one of the few critics who actually liked Ang Lee's 2003 "Hulk," but it didn't exactly ring the cash registers or clamor for a continuation.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Rappoport is a powerhouse performer but the movie is an unstable concoction of political melodrama, film noir, and weepie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It has its modicum of suspense, and Brendon Fraser, who stars as intrepid professor Trevor Anderson – who does indeed journey to the center of the Earth – is his usual heroically affable self.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Reilly is a good foil for Ferrell, but too many of their scenes together have the effect of improv night at the comedy club.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Not infrequently the movie is as mediocre as its target. The great Steve Coogan movie has yet to be made.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    He's a mishmash of cultural opposites, and his motormouth swagger is fitfully amusing. So is his backhand.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's not only Phoebe whose daydreams go out of control. Daniel Barnz, the writer-director, also goes a bit flooey. There's a lot more perspiration than inspiration.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    At times, Pride and Glory seems to be about a war between actors, not cops. Nobody comes off well.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I'd be more inclined to call this French dysfunctional family epic gabby and preeningly self-indulgent – in a word, annoying.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Crossing Over is not a success but make no mistake: There is great drama to be found in these streets.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    For most of the way this ecofriendly fantasy is pleasantly clunky, and Reeves, whose expressive range here is slim to none, is perfectly cast as the alien.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's a good thing that this movie has so many crisscrossing subplots. If one gaggle of whiners gets on your nerves, rest assured the scenery will soon change and another will take center stage.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    12
    I haven't heard this much shouting in a movie since the first hour of "Full Metal Jacket."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Easy Virtue has aspirations to be much more than a comedy. It wants to flay, if only with a penknife, the entire British class system.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Sometimes a film is best utilized as a travelogue. Such is the case with the comedy-drama The Girl From Monaco, which isn't much of a movie but offers scrumptious views.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A promising premise and some very good actors are smothered in goo in The Answer Man.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The movie is a decidedly mixed bag, in part, because of the equally pronounced disparities between Burton and Carroll – and between Burton and Disney, for that matter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Green Zone wraps up with a wish-fulfillment fantasy that is about as believable as watching reinforcements riding in to save Custer.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The film somehow manages to be both a turn-on and a turnoff.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The movie, at its best, is compellingly odd, which is also the most accurate description of Carrey's performance.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Actually, it's hard to have any thoughts while watching Jonah Hex – the cranium-crushing soundtrack takes care of that.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Overall, Diggers is like an Ed Burns movie -- but with fishing gear.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Only Rebecca Hall comes through with a genuineness that rises above Holofcener’s doodlings. Her scenes with Guilbert resonate because, in the end, Rebecca is the only character in the movie who seems to care about anything other than his or her own – take your pick – bank account, complexion, weight, guilt. In this company, she’s practically a saint.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    What Looking For Eric demonstrates is that drama, not comedy, is how Loach makes sense of things. On the other hand, I often find his dramas unremittingly bleak. I guess what I'm really saying is that I'm not a big fan of Ken Loach.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Compared with, say, Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto," which featured this sort of stuff in practically every frame, Marshall's film is downright Disneyish.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Once around the block with these folks is more than enough.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A more contrived and tenuous premise you would be hard-pressed to find, although, since this is a romantic comedy, suspension of disbelief comes with the territory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    As Disney animated features go, Tangled is middling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It must be said that the filmmakers, who profess to be as surprised as we are about how things play out, are being disingenuous at best and underhanded at worst.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Cary Grant, to take the premier example, was a great screwball comic who was, at the same time, intensely romantic. With Grant, funniness and sexiness were twinned. This is an exceedingly difficult combo to bring off, and Duris, though it would be unfair to compare him with Grant, doesn't come close.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A little of this movie's preppy, whiny expostulation goes a long way.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Framed as a cautionary thriller about the perils of high-stakes terrorism, but I took away a different message from it: Don't forget your briefcase at the airport.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Bhutto family is often referred to as the "Pakistani Kennedys." After seeing this film, that designation doesn't sound so glib anymore.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s not just Frankie who is putting on a show here. Berry is also overemphatically showing off her chops.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I prefer the goofier approach, which is why, even though Hemsworth isn't going to be cast in "King Lear" anytime soon, he's the best thing about Thor.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    When the military brass warns that "we're about to be colonized," you wonder if they mean to shut down the borders. It's probably not coincidental that the film is replete with Latino actors, or that one of the prime subplots involves a Hispanic father trapped behind enemy lines with his young son.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's the kind of cutesy idea that doesn't ring remotely true.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even the "surprise" appearance of Keith Richards, as the scurvy father of Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow, has already been hyped to death in the advance press.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    However you slice it, The Eagle is hokum, but modern-day Scots may get a kick out of the film's depiction of their ancestors as mud-caked hellions. Modern-day Romans will have to settle for less.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If Abrams had stuck with the kids and cut way back on all the sci-fi hoo-ha, his film might have stood a fighting chance of being charming. Big is not always better, even when it comes to fantasies.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's enough that these two castaways are friends, but I guess friendship doesn't cut it when you're trying to create a star-driven hit. It should, though. Better a believable friendship than an unbelievable love affair.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even though none of these guys is ready to kick the bucket, The Big Year has an unmistakable affinity with "The Bucket List."
    • 23 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Adam Sandler plays a dual role in Jack and Jill, and he's a lot better as Jill than as Jack.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If this film turns out to be a big success, malls everywhere may want to hire more security.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The latest cinematic adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's novel, is like "Masterpiece Theater" without the masterpiece.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Polley has a sometimes graceful understanding of emotional temperate zones and Williams, when she isn't being zombielike, is touching. But Margot comes across as such an elusive and unsympathetic twit that you wonder why we should care about her.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Some of the fairy tale effects are marvelous; but the odyssey from darkness to light is unduly long and sloggy, and Stewart, with her contemporary edge, seems to be acting in the wrong era.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Too much of this movie, directed by Peter Ramsey, is more clamorous than inspired, and little kids might find parts of it too scarily intense.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    So why is everything so thuddingly fun-free?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Not awful, not wonderful, Jack the Giant Slayer is a midrange fairy tale epic that’s a lot more ho-hum than fee-fi-fo-fum.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Were it not for Anne Hathaway's Catwoman-ish Selina Kyle, there wouldn't be a single character in "Rises" who cracks a smile. I'm not arguing that "Rises" should be "Singin' in the Rain." But its Wagnerian ambitions are not matched by its material. It hasn't earned its darkness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Despite its arty veneer and its ostensibly political edge, Circumstance seems more interested in titillation than revelation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One of the few open-minded Hollywood movies about Christian fundamentalism, but the mind isn't sufficiently exploratory.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The film is best when it focuses on Barnabas's culture shocks in this brave new world. Depp has fun with the character's bafflements without camping it up. What's missing overall is the sense of fun Burton once evinced in films like "Beetlejuice."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One thought that occurred to me while pacing myself through Flypaper: With the economy being what it is, will there be a rash of bank robbery movies?
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Blomkamp overdoes even his best effects. (I would have welcomed more vistas of Elysium to break up the grungefest.) If Elysium is an example of how recession-era Hollywood intends to dramatize the rift between the haves and the have-nots, let’s hope the studios don’t also bring back Smell-O-Rama.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Safe Haven is a species of Gothic chick flick.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Raimi’s film is supposed to be about magic, but magic is in scant supply.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    My first thought in watching The Hobbit was: Do we really need this movie? It was my last thought, too.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    De Niro, in what amounts to an extended cameo, is radically miscast. That's still no excuse for his nonperformance, which is beyond lackluster.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Too much of The Names of Love is a joke book posing as a movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The bad guys, who specialize in funny beards, funny accents, and shaved heads, would feel right at home in an "Austin Powers" movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Iron Lady is too bland to be controversial, too antiquated to speak to the present.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    My favorite moment in the movie: Astrophysicist Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgard) insisting on wearing only his underwear because he says he thinks better that way. Hey, whatever works.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    When a great movie subject results in a middling movie, the loss is double.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Chris Wedge falls into the common animator’s trap of making the “human” characters a lot duller than the nonhuman creepy-crawlies.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    See the film, if you must, for Mara, who will be starring in the upcoming Hollywood remake of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." She's a sharp, vigilant actress whose career bears watching.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even the humor is played too broadly – another notch and we'd be in "Monty Python" territory, though not half as witty.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s nice to see oldsters cavorting in kaboom movies, but a little of this stuff goes a long way.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    By showing scenes of torture without taking any kind of moral (as opposed to tactical) stand on what we are seeing, Bigelow has made an amoral movie – which is, I would argue, an unconscionable approach to this material.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The slapstick is often clunky, but Robinson has a sweet jester’s disposition that keeps many of the gags from collapsing.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Who can really differentiate between these films anyway? In the end, they all devolve (evolve?) into clashing, clanging bots.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A dash – only a dash – of Tim Burton ghoulishness might have helped.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Robert Stromberg, making his debut as a director after supervising the visual effects for movies like “Alice in Wonderland” and “Avatar,” lacks the transcendent touch.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Tatum muscles his way through the role with panache, while Foxx never gets a chance to break loose.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s not really such a great achievement to have women cops in the movies acting as boorish and rowdy as their male counterparts, especially since the movie seems designed for a sequel. But then again, what movie these days – or at least this summer – isn’t?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There’s a creepy subtext to all this, especially when Tim uses his time-travel gifts to woo an American girl without her assent.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s essentially a buddy-cop romp with the usual assortment pack of graphic gruesomeness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Gandolfini, though, is a standout as the old-school father who can't abide his new-style son (but loves him anyway).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Needless to say, everybody comes equipped with their very own overweight baggage; old grudges are revived, new ones are invented; and big personal revelations – most of which you can see coming a mile away – arrive on cue.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s still a bit early in the long careers of these actors, especially Kline, to be playing creaky codgers. It’s bad enough when Hollywood casts women over the age of 30 as grandmothers-in-waiting. Now we have to endure an onslaught of famous veteran actors complaining about their hips.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Jarecki's thesis is that law enforcement targets minority communities, but his analysis is far too simplistic. Since when did pushers become victims?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Lee is very good at creating a sense of free-floating dread, but he, and his screenwriter Mark Protosevich, don’t have a real flair for pulp.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Has some vitality, but it sinks into cliché just the same.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    True love beckons in the guise of a dingbat played by Julianne Moore and all is right with the world. As Jon’s father, a man whose lifeblood is yelling, Tony Danza is very funny. He makes you understand what his son is escaping from.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Their 40-year marriage seems like more of a trial than this overweening, lightly likable movie acknowledges.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The chemistry may be good, the movie isn’t.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This is fire-breathing melodrama masquerading as social commentary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The film has a creepy allure but, as movies featuring full-bore sexual gamesmanship often do, it wears thin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director and co-writer John Krokidas doesn’t have a very fluent gift for period re-creation – everything seems stagy – and most of the actors, playing divas of various stripes, overact.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Sometimes, oftentimes, trailers showcase only the good stuff. The actual movie is a pale substitute. Such is the case here.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s an only-in-America success story worth recounting.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If only there was less mush and more meat in this stew.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There is no law requiring a biopic to make “nice” with its subject, but Get On Up, which presents Brown almost entirely unflatteringly except as a performer, makes you wonder why the filmmakers (including Mick Jagger, one of its producers) took the trouble.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Most of the music is by New Radicals frontman Gregg Alexander, and it’s heartfelt without ever really touching the heart.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Wladyslaw Pasikowski has made the mistake of going about his business as if he were fashioning a horror film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The sole bright spot is Christopher Walken playing a benevolent Mafia don.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    As generic as its title.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The trouble with pet projects is that too often they are unduly do-goody, and so it is here.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s all third-rate “Pink Panther” stuff, and Brosnan, eager to play down his 007 bona fides, overcorrects.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It comes on strong, but in its bloody heart of hearts it’s no more resonant than one of those old Vincent Price-Edgar Allan Poe contraptions – and less entertaining, too.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Halfway through the movie, I decided a better title for this weepie contraption would be “The Hurt Letter.”
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    As the murderer, Stanley Tucci is intensely creepy but, like almost everybody else in this movie, he’s more gothic figment than flesh and blood.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Just sweet enough to avoid being negligible.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It probably won't make a jot of difference to all the screaming tweeners lining up to see this movie, but The Twilight Saga: New Moon is not wonderful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Jake Gyllenhaal…the film’s only piece of believable acting.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    De Niro, trying his ordinary-guy best not to be mannered, gives one of his most mannered performances.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The Brothers Bloom is much more interested in showing off its own smarts, such as they are, than in challenging the audience's.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    A sad experience, but the sadness has no emotional heft because its people have none. This movie hasn't earned its funk.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Based flimsily on a minor F. Scott Fitzgerald story, it's an anecdote stretched to would-be epic proportions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Ballast lacks ballast. Much praised by aficionados of minimalist indie cinema – hey, who needs a plot when you've got mood? – it's a wearying slog through anomie in a Mississippi Delta township.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    300
    Just about everything in this pea-brained epic is overscaled and overwrought – it's a cartoon trying to be a towering triptych.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    There's good bad taste and then there's just plain bad bad, which is what describes most of Brüno.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Over time, though, with films such as "Lost Highway" and, to a lesser extent, "Mulholland Drive," Lynch's movies became less personal and more private. Whatever he is working out in his new film, Inland Empire, it's beyond the reach of all but his idolators.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    It may not be much of a movie, but it's a terrific concert.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Stay home.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Could we please declare a moratorium on funny-sad movies about dysfunctional families, especially families that come together for the holidays?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Any resemblance (except qualitatively) to "An Officer and A Gentleman" is strictly unaccidental.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Tsotsi never comes across as anything but a brutal cipher, and serious issues such as black-on-black crime in the townships are left unexplored.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Alexandre Aja directs in full glop mode and the cast includes a few performers, including Ted Levine (from "Monk"), Robert Joy, and Kathleen Quinlan, who probably wish they were elsewhere.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The movie isn't boring, exactly. It's too nutty for that.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Take the Lead mixes classical dance with hip-hop gyrations and features perhaps the most scrubbed set of delinquents since "West Side Story."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The cast is terrific, the movie isn't... It all plays like the pilot for a series that wasn't picked up.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Peregrym is a fresh-faced beauty and Bridges is enjoyably cranky, but the film is as bland as an Afterschool Special.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    This is one of those movies that profits from very low expectations. If you go in expecting something dreadful, be assured: It's only near dreadful.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    There is a germ of a good idea in the notion that an imaginary suitor can be more powerful than a real one. But director Alejandro Agresti isn't the man to pull it off.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    By making Nacho a do-gooder, Hess defuses Black's subversive energy. You could argue that Black also played a do-gooder in "School of Rock," but the kids in that film were a lot spunkier, and Black wasn't constantly playing for sympathy as he does here.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    I don't mean to imply that this film is any good or that it contains an ounce of genuine insight. But as a template for the big-baby genre, it's invaluable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    What begins as a twisted sex romp turns film noir-ish. Guthe is so anxious to show us what a larcenous tramp Mini is that he never shows us any other sides to her.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    As the corrupt, populist Louisiana governor Willie Stark, Crawford was such a swaggering behemoth that it would take Godzilla to upstage him. Sean Penn isn't quite that.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The only performance worth watching is Costner's. Now that he seems resigned to being something less than an A-list luminary, he is often modest and affecting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    By turns jokey, portentous, and pretentious, the movie immediately sizes up each of its protagonists and never budges from that assessment.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Levinson made a great political comedy once, "Wag the Dog," but that had a script by David Mamet. Here, Levinson seems to be torn between making a political jest and a suspense thriller. Neither works.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    There has to be a good reason to put yourself through yet another junkie odyssey and Candy flunks the test.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Black and Kyle Gass started their acoustic/heavy metal rock music comedy act back in the late 1980s. Gold albums and HBO shorts followed, now this. Still, any movie featuring Jack Black with an appearance by Sasquatch is not a total loss, and, for those who care, we learn the origin of the group's name.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Home of the Brave is a milestone of sorts. But it's a formulaic, overacted piece of work that rarely delves deep.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Having written a book about being fired, Annabelle Gurwitch has now made a documentary as well, and it's something of a mess.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    At times, Bullock seems as confused by the plot as we are. Even if you cut the writer Bill Kelly and the director Mennan Yapo a lot of slack, there are plot holes galore. May I suggest that it's time to declare a moratorium on movies about time?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    There is a dearth of good children's films right now, at least of the nonanimated variety, and undoubtedly The Last Mimzy will fill a vacuum for some families. But it's a default choice, not a prime pick.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    This ghastly swatch of pulp horror is compelling at the most basic level, but so little is going on in it that you might as well be watching a sadistic lab experiment performed on mice.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The film is a so-so slog through a torrent of tired jokes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    The performances, especially by Hugh Dancy as a sexually confused rich kid, are overwrought, and the script, which Michael Cunningham ("The Hours") wrote in collaboration with Minot, is slack.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Rainer
    Awash in spurious sentimentality and sniping.