For 2,097 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Triplets of Belleville
Lowest review score: 0 Final Destination 3
Score distribution:
2,097 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Like much reality TV, sections of American Teen seem patently staged, or coached, for the camera.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Best when it's morphing into seriousness. Too often the comic bits seem like sops to the audience.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    For all its pretensions and intermittent power, is essentially high-grade claptrap.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Smith, it should be noted, has compared Neville in interviews to Job. Tone down the highfalutin references. In the end, this is a sci-fi zombie movie, folks.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Washington doesn’t look as if he’s having much fun, and who can blame him? Perhaps he agrees with me: Apocalypse movies, like apocalypse heroes, need some laughs, too.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    May be accurate around the edges, but at its heart it's a fairy tale.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The whole thing is piffle, but it moves fast enough to stay entertaining.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Cruise is better than he’s been in a while because he damps down his usual all-intensity-all-the-time MO. He’s best here when his character seems the most scared. And Emily Blunt as a commando legend is indomitable, a credit to her exoskeleton.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Rush isn’t bad, exactly, but it’s like a standard-issue male action programmer that somehow crept in from an earlier era.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Aside from these two actors (Downey/Rourke), Iron Man 2 isn’t much of a whoop-de-do.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's not only light, it's thin. It's self-deprecating to a fault. Reynolds is required to practically wink at the audience, as if to say,"I know this looks silly."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Hartley is very adept with actors, though – or at least some of them. Posey, for her part, displays a pert quizzical quality that's very charming and very funny. And Goldblum is tailor-made for Hartley's minimalist patter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What we're left with is outrage in a vacuum. It's impossible to separate out the stop-loss tactic from the misadventures of the war itself, and that's what this film, to its discredit, accomplishes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film itself vaporizes before your eyes, but it’s likable. Given its unstable mishmash of thuggery and whimsy, that’s something of an achievement.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Melvin Van Peebles gets the idolatrous treatment in this documentary by first-time director Joe Angio that traces his subject's career as San Francisco cable-car conductor, rap pioneer, filmmaker, Broadway producer, stockbroker, and all-around womanizer.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's all rather sweet but instantly evanescent.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Garner is good, and so is Brian Dennehy as a crusty ranch owner; Abigail Breslin, playing a leukemia patient, demonstrates that she was not a one-note wonder in "Little Miss Sunshine."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's more than enough that the Wilsons were punished and pilloried for telling the truth. We don't need to see them sanctified by righteousness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The conceit here is that if a boy and a girl love the same music, that means they're in love. Who am I to argue with such poetic whimsy?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Could have used a lot more grit. Without it, we're left with a crime movie fantasia that slips all too easily into the ether.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Has its lewd funniness, though not often enough to make it worthy of not only "Bad Santa" but, more to the point, "School of Rock."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's a carefully manicured, almost genteel piece of moviemaking. The film is paradoxically both rousing and lulling.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    If Freedomland reminds you of Spike Lee's "Clockers," that's not by accident. Like that film, it's adapted by Richard Price from his novel and is set in the neighboring Northern New Jersey communities of Dempsy, predominantly poor and African-American, and the largely white blue-collar suburb of Gannon.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Although his movie often resembles the kind of promotional video one might find as an extra on a concert DVD, N'Dour in full throttle is a sight, and sound, to behold.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What the film is saying, so far as I can tell, is that, if cut, you will bleed. And bleed. As the vampire's kindred Seven Deadly Sinner, wild-haired Kim Ok-vin looks like she's having a high old time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    My only regret is that the film could not somehow take a leap forward to 1988. I would love to have seen what Lee and Will could do with "Die Hard."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Abbott has a compelling unpredictability, though, and in a couple of his scenes with Lynskey, you can spot the stirrings of a more complex film than the one we finally ended up with.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's an omnisexual variation on François Truffaut's "Jules and Jim," although stylistically, with its emphases on hipper-than-thou attitudes and moody-blues visuals, it's much closer to the early work of Jean-Luc Godard and Wong Kar-Wai.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    We see him (Brolin) whip up a first-class chili, but his specialty is peach pie, which we watch him prepare so lovingly that I was surprised Reitman didn’t include the recipe in the end credits.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Wilson has a gawky affability here that helps redeem much that might otherwise seem tasteless (as opposed to tasteless-but-funny).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Warrior becomes increasingly shameless until, by the end, with the big fights fought, we are clearly meant to rise as one and applaud the indomitability of the human spirit. But the only indomitable thing about Warrior are its clichés.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    July, like Hal Hartley, another overrated art-house luminary, is an acquired taste I have yet to acquire.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Fred Schepisi, one of the world's great directors ("The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith," "A Cry in the Dark") is working at half-speed in The Eye of the Storm, a convoluted family drama derived from a Patrick White novel.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This is a movie that cries out for more than the too-cool-for-school Coppola’s trademark hipster anomie. She may be too much a part of the celebrity-mongering world she portrays to do justice to its injustices.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Compared to "Capote," this new film is altogether lighter.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There's something foul about staging the assassination of a sitting president in order to push a political agenda that could just as easily have been put forward without resorting to such sensationalism.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Deft and fast-moving, but shouldn’t a musical have at least a few songs you can hum on your way home?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Syriana falls down at the most basic storytelling level, and this incoherence damages even the good parts.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's all tease in the first half, and all implausibilities in the second. Still, Thomas is always worth watching, in French or in English, whether her mood be chilly or tropical.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Anonyma stands out in A Woman in Berlin not only because of her ragged nobility but also because, alas, Färberböck has surrounded her with a gaggle of Berliners who seem right out of Central Casting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Despite the film’s intentions, Idris and Seun can’t really stand in for anybody but themselves. What they go through, as middle-class kids in a privileged school system, seems far less race-based than the filmmakers would have us believe.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The filmmakers's attempts to balance out the gung-ho shoot-'em-ups with an overlay of "fairness" are rudimentary. The movie works us into a frenzy of righteous revenge, it makes us cheer each kill by the FBI warriors, and then it tells us that this violence only breeds more violence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The greatest performance, though, is Vanessa Redgrave's as Martius's blood-lusting mother, Volumnia. It's an extraordinarily powerful piece of acting, all controlled rage. When, in the end, that rage erupts, her vehemence splits the screen.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Some of the human-interest stories are compelling, but too much of this film is as dry as a high school classroom presentation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Not much depth or political examination here. The film works best as a survivalist’s manual.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At around the halfway point the film takes an intriguing swerve, as Kyle is canonized and Lance is unexpectedly launched into celebrityhood. Flashes of deadpan outrageousness occasionally redeem the dourness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Savages isn't about anything except flashily directed mayhem. In this nest of vipers, it's the slitheriest varieties that survive – at least for a time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The best reason to check the film out is Ejiofor's performance, which is packed with grace and wit and pathos.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    No doubt some of it is charming enough to induce giggles in its preteen target audience.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Was Maher afraid he might muddy his clownish jape if he actually brought into the mix a learned theologian?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    What it's mainly about is movie stars skittering from locale to locale while bullets whiz by and the plot thickens – or, more to the point, curdles.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Art School Confidential mostly just makes you feel bad - period. It puts you in a foul mood and leaves you there.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Because Crowe is hamstrung by his role, he never strikes the requisite sparks with Cotillard. This is quite an achievement, since her beauty is on par with Provence's.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    In the name of unblinking realism, Szász overdoes the allegory. There are no sacrificial gestures here, no heroism, no tears. He comes on as truth-teller, but he’s only telling half the truth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Far from a flop, and I'm sure the Spider-maniacs will eat it up. For me, it's a buffet without much aftertaste.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Cronenberg has a distinctive style – deadpan absurdism laced with fright and all executed with slow deliberation. But too much of Eastern Promises is cultish and silly.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The film is deliberately old-fashioned in its approach; the story line is resolutely linear and the production values are deluxe. It all makes for a fairly enjoyable, if schematic, backstage extravaganza.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Marginally better than its predecessor, but the same problem still remains: Cars just aren't very interesting as anthropomorphic animation vehicles (pun intended).
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Ratner, who has been accurately dubbed a "fauxteur," does an OK job keeping the action swirling, especially in the finale atop the Eiffel Tower.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Whereas the original, directed by Joseph Sargent, was essentially a well-oiled B movie, the new incarnation, directed by Tony ("Enemy of the State") Scott, is bristling with high-tech gimcrackery and over-the-top camera flourishes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Although the movie goes way back into Rumsfeld’s career, it is the Iraq section that is the most noteworthy – and disappointing. Morris elicits virtually nothing revelatory from Rumsfeld.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Essentially three movies in one: The staged reenactment of Columbus's expedition, the filming of that staged expedition, and the contemporary local uprising. It's a lot to bite off, especially since Bollaín's budget doesn't seem to be much larger than Sebastián's.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Brand can seem simultaneously randy and strung-out and is often very funny. Hill is surprisingly touching.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    He was the Beatles of the hair business.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's worth noting that this movie is loosely based on actual people – except the real-life Driss character is, in fact, an Arab. If Driss had been an Arab, The Intouchables would have waded into less navigable waters, but it might have made for a tougher movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    By skewing the film into a father-son inspirational saga, the filmmakers sell out the best possibilities in their material. Lurie clearly wants Resurrecting the Champ to be "more" than a sports movie, or a newspaper movie. Ironically, he ends up with less.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    If this was a quintessential Polanski movie, something malign would reside inside its heart: The sitcom would explode its boundaries. The movie is called Carnage, but the carnivores on display are toothless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It's never altogether clear why this visually blah and dramatically bland movie needed to be made at all (or why it wasn't made for television instead). The only answer I can come up with is that Murray wanted to show off with a cigarette-holder.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Miss Bala has been praised on the festival circuit for being a gritty look at the Mexican drug trade but too often it seemed like a bargain-bin "Scarface" to me.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Frankly, the most disturbing thing about Prime is that Uma Thurman is now officially an Older Woman.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Highly uneven, but at least it doesn’t glamorize Hawking’s life or turn it into a paean to endurance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    There are many things wrong with Julie and Julia but, if you're looking to get hitched, you won't find a better booster.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    The young cast members, including Justin Long and Ryan Reynolds, are often spirited and funny, and restaurantgoers are left with a valuable lesson.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Rust and Bone is made by filmmakers and actors who are capable of much more – and they know it. The result is a true oddity: an orgy of hokum dressed up as an art film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Dunst gives a strong, hard-bitten performance even though she is playing an attitude rather than a character. Much of Justine's upsets are recorded in Von Trier's shaky-cam style – seasick realism. The grand planet-busting finale, though, is a beauty.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Zilberman's conceit is that these players, who mesh so beautifully in their music-making, are discordant in their personal lives. Those lives are constructed for maximum messiness, turning what might have been resonant drama into high-class soap opera.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Set in Japanese-occupied Shanghai during World War II, Ang Lee's uneven new film is a bit like a Chinese variant on Paul Verhoeven's "The Black Book." The sex scenes in this otherwise overly prim period piece are extremely graphic.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    It pales beside the best down-and-dirty political movies (ranging from "The Candidate" to "The Manchurian Candidate") because, finally, it lacks the courage of its own lowdown convictions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Ridley Scott has made two iconic sci-fi films, "Alien" (1979) and "Blade Runner" (1982). Trying for a hat trick with Prometheus, he comes up short. I'll say this much for it – it's not boring.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Cao Hamburger works well with child actors and has a spare, unforced style. But too much of this film is desultory and thin.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Director Len Wiseman is good on action, and Patrick Tatopoulus's dystopic production design is within hailing distance of "Blade Runner," his chief influence. But essentially this is a big-screen video game.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Switching between the 1950s, the '60s, and the present, it's compelling in a middling miniseries kind of way – expansive but not terribly deep.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    At times, the movie resembled nothing so much as Kabuki with Cosmos.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Soderbergh and screenwriter Scott Z. Burns maintain a tone of taut creepiness, but the plot’s double and triple crosses are more ingenious than believable.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Something is going on all the time, even if that something is oftentimes clumsy, nonsensical, or flat. But the sheer whoosh of the story line keeps you watching anyway.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Equal parts preachy and melodramatic, The Company You Keep never quite figures out what it wants to be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Judged on any kind of rational level, this film is a mess, and Fairuza Balk, as a punky friend of Howard's son, gives the single most annoying performance I have ever seen. But Franz Lustig's cinematography has a Walker Evans-like power.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    This is a kid’s fantasy of how to be bigger and badder than anybody else. As for Washington, no doubt he now has his very own franchise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Boyle loads his movie with so many snazzy effects that we lose sight of what it all means – if anything. His showoffiness confuses.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    Depp is disappointingly recessive here, as he often is when he's playing characters who don't have an antic streak.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Peter Rainer
    As the movie moves through its murder mystery mode and begins racking up political points, Hank becomes a stand-in for all those Americans bewildered and beleaguered by the war. He becomes a Symbol.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Rainer
    Henry Fool finds Hartley assimilating Godard's ideas with far more assurance than in previous pictures like "Amateur" and "Flirt."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's an opulent, if instantly disposable, kinetic joyride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a marvelous, resonant joke that never quite succeeds: Stretches of the film resemble a Dario Argento horrorfest crossed with a Mel Brooks spoof. But the director, E. Elias Merhige, and his screenwriter, Steven Katz, occasionally bring some rapture to the creepiness, and Dafoe's vampire, with his graceful, ritualistic death lunges, is a sinewy, skull-and-crossbones horror who seems to come less out of the German Expressionist tradition than from Kabuki.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Has an appealing rawness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The entire remake has been dumb-dumbed by John Hughes, who wrote the script and produced.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Franklin directs smoothly, but except for Freeman, the theatrics are pretty pro forma.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What's weird about subUrbia is that Linklater's zoned-out technique is wedded to Bogosian's in-your-face power-rant oratory. The result is like local anesthesia--you can see the incisions, but you can't feel them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Suggests a cross between "Sunset Boulevard" and "All About Eve." The suggestion, alas, doesn't go very far, but Bening's performance approaches the pantheon.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Anderson is something of a prodigy himself, and he's riddled with talent, but he hasn't figured out how to be askew and heartfelt at the same time. When he does, he'll probably make the movie The Royal Tenenbaums was meant to be, and it'll be a sight to see.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Except for a few brilliant flashes, mostly from Peter O'Toole as Hector’s father, the Trojans' magisterially woebegone King Priam, Troy is a fairly routine action picture with an advanced case of grandeuritis.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    LaBute is attacking our society’s obsession with the surface of things, whether it be a painter’s canvas or a human one, but his drama is, in itself, relentlessly superficial.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I wanted to be transported by this movie; I wasn't quite. But I respect it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fortunately, there are more than enough moments when the heavy-handedness gives way to the sheer bliss of ordinary magic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Watching it is like getting a peek behind the curtain. But it's frustrating, too, because the casting of Emadeddin as a murderer-in-the-making precludes any psychological depth. And as an indictment of social inequality, which is the film's calling card, Panahi inadvertantly makes a far better case for the haves than for the have-nots.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    He doesn’t entirely succeed, but the attempt has poignancy: As uneven as much of his recent work has been, Bertolucci's still in love with the movies, and his ardor--if not always the ends he puts it to--is exhilarating.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The problem is that Allen is getting a bit long in the tooth to be playing a romancer-rescuer, and since he and Helen Hunt have a rather frigid actorly rapport, we have plenty of time to notice the awkward, and barely acknowledged, disparity in their ages.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    At one point, Val bemoans how stupid the country is, how dumbed-down everything has become. Allen's new movie is far from dumb, but it has an air of abdication about it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What makes Nolte so much stronger than the other performers is precisely this sense of mysteriousness and indirection, which doesn't really correspond to the Adam Verver of the novel but certainly jibes with James's overall method.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Lee has phenomenal presence, and his movements are so balletically powerful that his rampages seem like waking nightmares. Lee keeps you watching The Crow when you'd rather look away.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I'm not sure I have it in me to rant yet again about what a deprivation it is for our finest actor to deny us his genius in this way.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Despite all the computer-generated effects and highflying superhero theatrics, this roughly $120 million movie is, with few exceptions, remarkable only in its small human touches.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fitfully effective as a battle movie, and Mel Gibson does his rugged best to take center stage without seeming to. But the movie is self-righteous in a way that's frequently unseemly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    There is in The Mother a rich understanding of where old age takes you. Along with the myth that seniors don't have sex drives, the film dispels a larger one: that the years bring wisdom.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Were it not for these performances (Blanchett, Ribisi, Swank, Reeves), The Gift would be fairly negligible.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I don’t mind the movie’s retro-ness, but I wish Mostow didn't take pulp so seriously.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    I realize that Fosse's dark sizzle might seem a bit dated today, but surely something halfway snazzy could have been devised for this movie. It's toothless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It’s the difference between artistry and knowingness. About Schmidt doesn’t bring us deeply into the lives of its people because it’s too busy trying to feel superior to them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Demme’s Manchurian Candidate is far from a disgrace, but it's not freewheeling enough, not strange enough to make sense of our gathering dread.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A great deal of energy is expended on metaphysical ruminations that become ever fuzzier. The film is intended as an allegory, but it works best as a jailbreak romance. In this movie, lowbrow trumps highbrow every time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Devos is especially fine as a woman whose inner solitude carries depth charges.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Talk to Her affects some people very deeply, while others, like me, find it high-grade kitsch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a sinuous, bittersweet odyssey, and although the filmmaking lacks finesse, the actors, especially Mandvi, with his bright, sorrowful beauty, and the great Om Puri, who plays Ganesh's father-in-law with an infernal crankiness, are always worth watching.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A sentimental, feel-good look at a family in mourning, but Jake Gyllenhaal rises above the clichéd script with a brilliantly creative performance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fortunately, most of the malarkey in this movie seems intentional in the same Sunday-afternoon-serial way as the Indiana Jones movies (some of which Johnston worked on).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Sam Rockwell plays Barris with a hipster’s shimmy that’s creepily effective -- The problem with making a movie about a hollow man is that, when things start to get heavy, you’re stuck with nothingness at the core.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Though worth seeing, should be better than it is.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    This time around, Harry Potter has more to worry about than the Dark Arts -- though parts of The Chamber of Secrets are spellbinding, he seems to be suffering from a bit of sequelitis.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Despite its exuberant perversities, Waters’s take on erotomania is almost quaint.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Leconte films in an austere yet invigorated style; the action never settles into stiff tableaux.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Fry's saving grace is his love of actors. The younger and less familiar performers are more than adequate, but it's the older guard that shines. Broadbent is marvelously rummy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Billy Ray is so eager to be fair-minded about everything and everyone that you can't help thinking he's a patsy, too. If he directed a movie of Othello, he'd probably try to make us feel warm and fuzzy about poor, misunderstood Iago.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Shyamalan wants to be the metaphysical poet of movies, but he's dangerously close to becoming its O. Henry. The best surprise ending he could give us in his next movie would be no surprise ending at all.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Some directors can profit from the strictures of a strong narrative, but, for Linklater, the conventionality of The Newton Boys works against the glide of his free-floating style.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Writer-director Andrew Niccol throws around a lot of intriguing ideas in this film, and even though his ambitions are more expansive than his talent, he's managed to come up with something that credibly resembles the shape of things to come, Hollywood-style.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Pretty much the whole movie is a series of poses, static and uninvolving, except for cinematographer Eduardo Serra’s lighting, which makes everything look convincingly Vermeer-ish. I’d like to see what he could do with Rembrandt.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    You can believe this man (Jones) left his family because he felt born into the wrong tribe. Now if only he had picked the right movie . . .
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The best new addition to the corp is Alan Cumming’s Nightcrawler.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It might seem as though there is nothing new to be done with the crime thriller, but The Code (La Mentale), directed by Manuel Boursinhac and written by Bibi Naceri, provides a new twist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    In U-Turn Stone is reaching for the pulp without the politics. He's trying for noir as ritual dance. But Stone is too frenzied a filmmaker to keep the dance steps simple.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Secretary is deeply conventional: Edward and Lee accept their bondage as the way to a more fulfilling life. It's the filmmakers who need to be spanked.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A lovely minor achievement. It would have been major if Breillat had been more expansive with respect to Anaïs instead of contentedly letting her go on about her lumpish ways.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Taking Sides has a padded-out, stagebound quality that is anything but lyrical. And Szabó, a Hungarian best known for "Mephisto" and "Colonel Redl," is not at his best here.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    If you're young enough to have missed some of the better Lemmon-Matthau pairings, like "The Fortune Cookie" or "The Odd Couple," then Grumpy Old Men won't seem so grumpy. [25 Dec 1993, p.2]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The effect is a bit like watching "Gone With the Wind" with a dumpling substituting for Scarlett O’Hara.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    What saves it is Dennis Quaid.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Should be remembered for a pair of performers -- Derek Luke and Viola Davis, whose cameo as the mother who abandoned him cuts through the sap like an acetylene torch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Directed by Alan Rudolph and co-scripted by him with Randy Sue Coburn, Mrs. Parker is a real odd duck of a movie. It seems to have been made both as tribute and put-down. The sporty conviviality of the Algonquin Round Table is celebrated, and yet there's a hollowness to the confabs.[21 Dec 1994, p.4]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    A bit too satisfied with its own sweet sensitivities.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's one of the weirdest achievements in film history: Temperamentally, Spielberg and Kubrick are such polar opposites that A.I. has the moment-to-moment effect of being completely at odds with itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The audience for Hannibal is far more primed for a good time; if the film is a hit, it will be because Lecter has been cartoonized; his ghoulish panache, his double entendres about cannibalism, and his pet phrases like "goody-goody" and "okeydokey" all serve to make him a figure of fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's a movie about the warm feeling you get when you belong to a family, and, throughout, the thermostat is turned up high.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Spartan is a character study embedded in an action-hero scenario. Neither aspect ever really breaks loose.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Neil Young’s concept album turned concert tour turned movie, which is like nothing I’ve ever seen--at least not in an unaltered state.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Even in a piffle like Something’s Gotta Give, Keaton reminds us of her uncanny ability to inhabit her characters' knockabout emotions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    This may sound like an Oprah episode, but the outcome is far from predictable and carries the force of a tragedy in which everyone, and no one, is to blame.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The Last Samurai is an idyll in which the savageries of existence are transcended by spiritual devotion. That’s a beautiful dream, and it gives the film a deep pleasingness, but the fullness of life and its blackest ambiguities are sacrificed.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It’s powerful, all right, and Downey’s performance is lacerating, but missing is any sense of lyricism in Dark’s hallucinatory yearnings. Without that leap of transcendence, this new Singing Detective doesn’t sing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's plotless. It fits no category -- "docudrama tone poem" probably comes closest.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    French Kiss tries to be a glass of pink champagne, but some of the fizz has gone out of the bottle. But director Lawrence Kasdan and screenwriter Adam Brooks cram so many potshots into the piece that, after a while, it makes you laugh anyway.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    If the filmmakers had made a point of satirizing the new makeover culture in ways that went beyond camp jibes at décor and suburbia, they might have come up with a classic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    CQ
    Not everything in this ambitious comic escapade works, but Coppola, along with his sister, Sofia, is a real filmmaker. It must be in the genes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    There's something a bit condescending about how the movie devolves into a falling-out-between-friends scenario, as if the only way our attention could be held by this subculture were if it was presented to us sentimentally.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Inspires the requisite shock and awe, but a little goes a long way. About the fifth time I saw someone slip-sliding away from a 60-foot wave, I longed to hear someone on the soundtrack say, “That guy is really nuts.”
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Even though The Devil's Own reportedly cost close to $100 million, it comes across as a sleek, medium-grade character study occasionally punctuated by gunfire. If this is what $100 million buys these days, can $200-million movies be very far off?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    It's all been done before, and better.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    Nothing that Davies does is ordinary or artless but his craftsmanship has its suffocating side too.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Rainer
    The filmmakers betray the essentially childlike appeal of Shrek by piling up all these too-hip Hollywood references aimed at adults. It's not just kids who will feel cheated.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Good German is a prime example of a movie made by highly skilled and intelligent filmmakers that nevertheless seems misguided from the get-go.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Haskins comes across as too pure. When he plays only his black athletes in the championship finals, his monomania is presented as a good thing. After all, he won, didn't he?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Jarecki's thesis is that law enforcement targets minority communities, but his analysis is far too simplistic. Since when did pushers become victims?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The movie, at its best, is compellingly odd, which is also the most accurate description of Carrey's performance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There is no law requiring a biopic to make “nice” with its subject, but Get On Up, which presents Brown almost entirely unflatteringly except as a performer, makes you wonder why the filmmakers (including Mick Jagger, one of its producers) took the trouble.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One thought that occurred to me while pacing myself through Flypaper: With the economy being what it is, will there be a rash of bank robbery movies?
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I'll say this much for Jumper – it's got a great premise. Or at least the beginnings of a premise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Green Zone wraps up with a wish-fulfillment fantasy that is about as believable as watching reinforcements riding in to save Custer.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Simon Pegg, of "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz," is onscreen almost constantly in Run Fatboy Run, and his mugging and smirking and preening wear out their welcome fast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Da Vinci Code is so transparently pitched as pulp entertainment that, in the end, it's about as subversive as "Starsky and Hutch."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    When the military brass warns that "we're about to be colonized," you wonder if they mean to shut down the borders. It's probably not coincidental that the film is replete with Latino actors, or that one of the prime subplots involves a Hispanic father trapped behind enemy lines with his young son.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The latest cinematic adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's novel, is like "Masterpiece Theater" without the masterpiece.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Rappoport is a powerhouse performer but the movie is an unstable concoction of political melodrama, film noir, and weepie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Although Casanova is far from a stinker, I can't join in the chorus of praise for what is essentially a coy farce replete with arch performances and even archer dialogue.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Laggies itself isn’t exactly slow – its pace is pleasantly meandering – and it’s far from aimless, although what it’s aiming for isn’t always clear.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A more contrived and tenuous premise you would be hard-pressed to find, although, since this is a romantic comedy, suspension of disbelief comes with the territory.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There is nothing surprising about the way this overlong movie, written and directed by David Dobkin, plays itself out.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A movie with ambitions as high-flying as its superhero but a success rate decidedly lower to the ground.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The film is best when it focuses on Barnabas's culture shocks in this brave new world. Depp has fun with the character's bafflements without camping it up. What's missing overall is the sense of fun Burton once evinced in films like "Beetlejuice."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's a good thing that this movie has so many crisscrossing subplots. If one gaggle of whiners gets on your nerves, rest assured the scenery will soon change and another will take center stage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Schmaltz this thick requires a director who can at least make us feel that our tears are not being shamelessly jerked. But St. Vincent is too clunky to hide its tear-slicked tracks. Maybe that’s a good thing. At least that’s more endearing than being worked over by a smooth operator who knows exactly which buttons to press.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Framed as a cautionary thriller about the perils of high-stakes terrorism, but I took away a different message from it: Don't forget your briefcase at the airport.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Reilly is a good foil for Ferrell, but too many of their scenes together have the effect of improv night at the comedy club.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    My favorite moment in the movie: Astrophysicist Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgard) insisting on wearing only his underwear because he says he thinks better that way. Hey, whatever works.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If you are not already familiar with Williams’s best plays and film adaptations, this musty magnolia of a movie won’t encourage you to seek them out.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I'd be more inclined to call this French dysfunctional family epic gabby and preeningly self-indulgent – in a word, annoying.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Some of the fairy tale effects are marvelous; but the odyssey from darkness to light is unduly long and sloggy, and Stewart, with her contemporary edge, seems to be acting in the wrong era.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Bhutto family is often referred to as the "Pakistani Kennedys." After seeing this film, that designation doesn't sound so glib anymore.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If this film turns out to be a big success, malls everywhere may want to hire more security.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    McCarthy is so careful not to take a political stand that his film seems neutered by good intentions. In the spirit of squishy humanism, he soft-pedals a hard-hitting topic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s not really such a great achievement to have women cops in the movies acting as boorish and rowdy as their male counterparts, especially since the movie seems designed for a sequel. But then again, what movie these days – or at least this summer – isn’t?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Tatum muscles his way through the role with panache, while Foxx never gets a chance to break loose.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Robert Stromberg, making his debut as a director after supervising the visual effects for movies like “Alice in Wonderland” and “Avatar,” lacks the transcendent touch.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Blomkamp overdoes even his best effects. (I would have welcomed more vistas of Elysium to break up the grungefest.) If Elysium is an example of how recession-era Hollywood intends to dramatize the rift between the haves and the have-nots, let’s hope the studios don’t also bring back Smell-O-Rama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Nolan tries to pair the cosmic esoterica with this father-daughter tussle, but the mix doesn't jell. Visionary movies require a bigger vision.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The movie is a decidedly mixed bag, in part, because of the equally pronounced disparities between Burton and Carroll – and between Burton and Disney, for that matter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    So why is everything so thuddingly fun-free?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's the kind of cutesy idea that doesn't ring remotely true.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    At times, Pride and Glory seems to be about a war between actors, not cops. Nobody comes off well.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    By showing scenes of torture without taking any kind of moral (as opposed to tactical) stand on what we are seeing, Bigelow has made an amoral movie – which is, I would argue, an unconscionable approach to this material.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    As Disney animated features go, Tangled is middling.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's enough that these two castaways are friends, but I guess friendship doesn't cut it when you're trying to create a star-driven hit. It should, though. Better a believable friendship than an unbelievable love affair.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This movie might have been better if it hadn't fashioned itself as a cross between "Citizen Kane" and "Chinatown," and instead had used Reeves's story to dramatize the transitional state of 1950s Hollywood.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a powerful subject, but director McG and screenwriter Jamie Linden haul out every cliché in the playbook.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Polley has a sometimes graceful understanding of emotional temperate zones and Williams, when she isn't being zombielike, is touching. But Margot comes across as such an elusive and unsympathetic twit that you wonder why we should care about her.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even though none of these guys is ready to kick the bucket, The Big Year has an unmistakable affinity with "The Bucket List."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Too much of this movie, directed by Peter Ramsey, is more clamorous than inspired, and little kids might find parts of it too scarily intense.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Considering this musical has its roots in Depression-era American, Gluck’s contemporary take on the material is eerily lacking in observations about the rich/poor divide in this country.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This is the kind of movie where we’re not supposed to know at any time who is playing whom, but since the characterizations are glossy and paper-thin, it’s difficult to get worked up about who gets fleeced.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s still a bit early in the long careers of these actors, especially Kline, to be playing creaky codgers. It’s bad enough when Hollywood casts women over the age of 30 as grandmothers-in-waiting. Now we have to endure an onslaught of famous veteran actors complaining about their hips.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I suppose it's asking too much for a great actor to be matched up with a great director on a project like this. On the other hand, there's always the sequel.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There’s a creepy subtext to all this, especially when Tim uses his time-travel gifts to woo an American girl without her assent.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Raimi’s film is supposed to be about magic, but magic is in scant supply.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    There’s something off-putting about this film’s optimism: After all, how many people can afford to do what Crowley did?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This latest whiffle ball from Team Apatow is a mildly amusing comedy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    However you slice it, The Eagle is hokum, but modern-day Scots may get a kick out of the film's depiction of their ancestors as mud-caked hellions. Modern-day Romans will have to settle for less.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    My first thought in watching The Hobbit was: Do we really need this movie? It was my last thought, too.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The slapstick is often clunky, but Robinson has a sweet jester’s disposition that keeps many of the gags from collapsing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Needless to say, everybody comes equipped with their very own overweight baggage; old grudges are revived, new ones are invented; and big personal revelations – most of which you can see coming a mile away – arrive on cue.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    By bringing the story into Iraq, Grant Heslov courts tastelessness. Gooniness and Gitmo don't mix.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s essentially a buddy-cop romp with the usual assortment pack of graphic gruesomeness.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Not infrequently the movie is as mediocre as its target. The great Steve Coogan movie has yet to be made.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Amy Adams is such a likable actress that she makes the romantic comedy Leap Year worth watching even though we’ve seen it all before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Patrice Leconte has directed excellent serious films such as "Monsieur Hire" and "Man on the Train," but when it comes to humor he loses his bearings. His latest attempt at seriocomedy, My Best Friend, is a premise in search of a film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The only grace note in this otherwise determinedly graceless movie is the classy way Walker’s exit is handled.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Overall, Diggers is like an Ed Burns movie -- but with fishing gear.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The law of diminishing returns is no more apparent than in the movie world. A sequel, with rare exceptions, is worse than the film it follows, and sequels of sequels fare even worse. Such is the case with Shrek the Third.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Once around the block with these folks is more than enough.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    He's a mishmash of cultural opposites, and his motormouth swagger is fitfully amusing. So is his backhand.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Most of it plays out as sub-medium-grade farce, but Carrey has some funny calisthenic bits where he appears to have the pliability of a rubber toy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Compared with, say, Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto," which featured this sort of stuff in practically every frame, Marshall's film is downright Disneyish.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The romantic comedy 27 Dresses will work best for people who have never seen a romantic comedy. If you have, you might find it amusing to tally up the steals – I mean, homages.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Che
    Although Steven Soderbergh's two-part Che may have an epic running time of almost 4-1/2 hours, its scope is surprisingly narrow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s an only-in-America success story worth recounting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Lee is very good at creating a sense of free-floating dread, but he, and his screenwriter Mark Protosevich, don’t have a real flair for pulp.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Only Rebecca Hall comes through with a genuineness that rises above Holofcener’s doodlings. Her scenes with Guilbert resonate because, in the end, Rebecca is the only character in the movie who seems to care about anything other than his or her own – take your pick – bank account, complexion, weight, guilt. In this company, she’s practically a saint.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Safe Haven is a species of Gothic chick flick.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Their 40-year marriage seems like more of a trial than this overweening, lightly likable movie acknowledges.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Not awful, not wonderful, Jack the Giant Slayer is a midrange fairy tale epic that’s a lot more ho-hum than fee-fi-fo-fum.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A dash – only a dash – of Tim Burton ghoulishness might have helped.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Draggy Italian epic that's big on production values but skimpy on inspiration.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    A few of the supporting players, including Kim Dickens, as a suspicious local cop, and Carrie Coon, as Nick’s twin sister, move beyond the formulaic, which is more than can be said for the movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Whatever brought Greene down was far more complex than this film allows for.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a showpiece for that Belgian city's medieval splendor. You may want to book vacation reservations upon leaving the theater, although the memory of this underwhelming movie may tarnish the sightseeing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Despite its arty veneer and its ostensibly political edge, Circumstance seems more interested in titillation than revelation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Amalric throws in flashbacks and flash-forwards between bedroom and courthouse (yes, there’s a murder), and I was reminded again why I prefer my noirs in the hardboiled American style rather than tricked up with all this faux Alain Resnais-style filigree.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It’s nice to see oldsters cavorting in kaboom movies, but a little of this stuff goes a long way.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    I prefer the goofier approach, which is why, even though Hemsworth isn't going to be cast in "King Lear" anytime soon, he's the best thing about Thor.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    De Niro, in what amounts to an extended cameo, is radically miscast. That's still no excuse for his nonperformance, which is beyond lackluster.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The film somehow manages to be both a turn-on and a turnoff.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Were it not for Anne Hathaway's Catwoman-ish Selina Kyle, there wouldn't be a single character in "Rises" who cracks a smile. I'm not arguing that "Rises" should be "Singin' in the Rain." But its Wagnerian ambitions are not matched by its material. It hasn't earned its darkness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The trouble with pet projects is that too often they are unduly do-goody, and so it is here.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    For most of the way this ecofriendly fantasy is pleasantly clunky, and Reeves, whose expressive range here is slim to none, is perfectly cast as the alien.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One dramatic ploy that doesn't work is the casting of Demi Moore as Tracy Edward, a homicide detective intent on capturing the Thumbprint Killer. Moore gave a rare good performance as the washed up diva in "Bobby," but her stridency here is grating.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Rudd is amusing enough; Segel, who towers over Rudd, is amusing, too, though the role seems to have been written for Owen Wilson. Maybe Wilson was busy. Lucky him.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If Abrams had stuck with the kids and cut way back on all the sci-fi hoo-ha, his film might have stood a fighting chance of being charming. Big is not always better, even when it comes to fantasies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Do we really need another Hulk movie? I was one of the few critics who actually liked Ang Lee's 2003 "Hulk," but it didn't exactly ring the cash registers or clamor for a continuation.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Sometimes, oftentimes, trailers showcase only the good stuff. The actual movie is a pale substitute. Such is the case here.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Actually, it's hard to have any thoughts while watching Jonah Hex – the cranium-crushing soundtrack takes care of that.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Mostly a snooze. Maybe if Buscemi himself had starred in it things would have turned out better.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    True love beckons in the guise of a dingbat played by Julianne Moore and all is right with the world. As Jon’s father, a man whose lifeblood is yelling, Tony Danza is very funny. He makes you understand what his son is escaping from.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    One of the few open-minded Hollywood movies about Christian fundamentalism, but the mind isn't sufficiently exploratory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Sometimes a film is best utilized as a travelogue. Such is the case with the comedy-drama The Girl From Monaco, which isn't much of a movie but offers scrumptious views.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Gandolfini, though, is a standout as the old-school father who can't abide his new-style son (but loves him anyway).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The bad guys, who specialize in funny beards, funny accents, and shaved heads, would feel right at home in an "Austin Powers" movie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It must be said that the filmmakers, who profess to be as surprised as we are about how things play out, are being disingenuous at best and underhanded at worst.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Playing a cantankerous, beer-swigging human wreck of a man for the umpteenth time, Nolte is very good but very familiar.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This documentary about the evangelical belief in biblical prophecy is both overly ambitious and skimpy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a rather lifeless re-telling of the Nativity, with greeting-card imagery and stiff performances.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's difficult to imagine the target audience for this film. Gangbangers, perhaps?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Ultimately, forgettable, but for most of the way it's a pleasant little vacation of a movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The sole bright spot is Christopher Walken playing a benevolent Mafia don.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Easy Virtue has aspirations to be much more than a comedy. It wants to flay, if only with a penknife, the entire British class system.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    12
    I haven't heard this much shouting in a movie since the first hour of "Full Metal Jacket."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's not only Phoebe whose daydreams go out of control. Daniel Barnz, the writer-director, also goes a bit flooey. There's a lot more perspiration than inspiration.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even the "surprise" appearance of Keith Richards, as the scurvy father of Johnny Depp's Captain Jack Sparrow, has already been hyped to death in the advance press.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Even the humor is played too broadly – another notch and we'd be in "Monty Python" territory, though not half as witty.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    See the film, if you must, for Mara, who will be starring in the upcoming Hollywood remake of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." She's a sharp, vigilant actress whose career bears watching.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The Iron Lady is too bland to be controversial, too antiquated to speak to the present.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It's a moderately enjoyable escapade that isn't quite clever enough for adults and not quite imaginative enough for children.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    When a great movie subject results in a middling movie, the loss is double.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    It has its modicum of suspense, and Brendon Fraser, who stars as intrepid professor Trevor Anderson – who does indeed journey to the center of the Earth – is his usual heroically affable self.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director and co-writer John Krokidas doesn’t have a very fluent gift for period re-creation – everything seems stagy – and most of the actors, playing divas of various stripes, overact.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    If writer-director Marc Lawrence had stuck with Alex's faded glory, Music and Lyrics could have been terrific. It could have been about something. Instead, he's confected a curdled valentine.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Chris Wedge falls into the common animator’s trap of making the “human” characters a lot duller than the nonhuman creepy-crawlies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Beautiful geishas flit and whoosh through the equally beautiful scenery. Their kimonos are artworks-in-motion. So why is the film so boring? It could be because director Rob Marshall is so transfixed by all the ritualistic hoo-ha that he never brings the story down to earth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    This is fire-breathing melodrama masquerading as social commentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    The derby sequences are just OK, and the conflict between Bliss and her uncomprehending parents, played by Marcia Gay Harden and (a fine) Daniel Stern, is so predictable that you wish someone had rolled onto the set to whip it into shape.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Too much of The Names of Love is a joke book posing as a movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Director Wladyslaw Pasikowski has made the mistake of going about his business as if he were fashioning a horror film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Chen Shi-Zheng, well regarded as an opera and theater director, makes his feature film debut.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Peter Rainer
    Watching actors tap out code as big buzzing screens of digital data flash on the screen just doesn’t cut it.

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