For 1,417 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Rainer's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 My Kid Could Paint That
Lowest review score: 0 Final Destination 3
Score distribution:
1,417 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    The results are far more exciting than most Hollywood espionage thrillers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Implicit in this film is a simple truth: The sheer force of artistry has the power to convert outsiders into insiders. I left Fill the Void feeling privileged, however briefly, to have been brought into this world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    I wish Rowley didn’t so often dabble in standard movie-thriller-style stylistics, but his film is an exposé of practices that need – demand – exposing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    His (Lindholm) steadfast, unvarying gaze has its own authenticity. He’s made a thriller that thrills while also respecting our intelligence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    By the film’s end, the main protagonists have become more philosophical, if no less ardent, about the future of Egypt. “We are not looking for a leader,” Hassan declares. “We are looking for a conscience.” He has only to look in the mirror.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    In top form, Joel and Ethan Coen offer up feel-bad experiences that, like fine blues medleys, make you feel good (although with an acidulous aftertaste). Inside Llewyn Davis is one of their best. So many movies are emblazoned with happy faces; this one wears its sadness, and its snarl, proudly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    What Tim’s Vermeer is really about is two geniuses, of very different sorts, communing across time and space.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Interviewed in the film, Juárez journalist Sandra Rodriguez offers up this grim summation: “That these people represent the ideal of success, impunity, and limitless power is symptomatic of how defeated we are as a society.”
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    One of the most dreamily unsettling documentaries ever made.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Peter Rainer
    Particle Fever doesn’t prompt us to say: “Gee, these superbrains are just like us, except for the brains.” The film allows for our awe. It also demonstrates that science is the most human of activities, with all that that implies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It ranks high on the Cronenberg scale as one of his more disturbing forays into depravity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    A solid achievement, but those in the press who have been trumpeting its greatness may be going in for a bit of self-congratulation. The movie plays very well to the choir.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    No great claims should be made for In Her Shoes. If the aim here was to show how chick lit can become just plain lit, the effort failed. But there is something to be said for froth when it's expertly whipped.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Black, who wrote "Lethal Weapon," makes his directorial debut, and he puts a fresh spin not only on that film but also on a whole slew of films noirs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The film is better than the recent "The War Within," which tried for the same things, but ultimately, and perhaps unavoidably, we are left face to face with the unknowable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Pound for pound, Ami is a heavyweight.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Plowright's performance as a genteel widow in Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont is a small-scale gem, deeply felt without being in the least bit showy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    The scenes between Kong and Ann are much more than a goof: They're the soul of the movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Rhys-Meyers and Johansson work well together - they both know how to project glossiness and guile.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This film would be better if it wasn't so slick. Still, parts of it are enjoyably shaggy, and Hopkins is very endearing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    This is the most Hitchcockian of Haneke's films. A seemingly well-adjusted man in a well ordered universe is brought to the brink.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It's a classic example of how a movie can be great without, strictly speaking, being good. But when something is this funny, who wants to speak strictly?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Soderbergh does overemphasize the "little-people" dreariness of it all. But there is much low-key humor here, too, albeit on the dark side.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    What actors! The great Miriam Margolyes has a wonderful cameo as a scullery maid, and Colin Firth manfully endures a face full of frosting. And then there's Angela Lansbury, playing her first movie role in 20 years as the villainous Aunt Adelaide.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Rothemund's use of the recorded testimony, while it gives his film a startling veracity, also limits his imagination. It prevents him from delving too deeply into the psychology of these activists.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Rapp has clearly been influenced by such lyrically disaffected '70s movies as "Five Easy Pieces." He brings out in Deschanel a sense of yearning, an avidity, that hits home.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    While I don't entirely rule out the possibility that Bruce is a hoaxster, it seems more likely that his story is one of those weird scientific anomalies that more frequently turn up as an Oliver Sacks case history.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    Sonia may seem happy-go-lucky at the start, but grief steels her. It makes her grow up very fast. She becomes a kind of heroine in the course of the film, which ultimately owes its stature to her presence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    So many movies these days are being linked, often quite tenuously, to current politics. Let this new film be no exception. I am happy to say that Ice Age: The Meltdown points up for toddlers the dangers of global warming.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Peter Rainer
    It's reminiscent of David Lynch, who is a master at mixing the ghastly and the risible. Brick would be better with a bit more Lynch in its soul, but Johnson is his own man, and I look forward to what he comes up with next.